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Found 7 results

  1. Well, I've graduated to Headquarters Driver but still TAD to Ships Laundry and assistant Coop cleaner. Mimi goes for her follow-up 2 week appointment with the surgeon tomorrow. Probably remove the staples and start therapy as well. Our Patriot Turners- @John Morris posted an inquiry on the popularity of pen turning. Turners seem to follow trends and pens were all the rage a while back. Our turners had several thoughts on the subject- I had missed one of John's post from back in December. He wondered, if given a choice, what would be our favorite three traditional turning tools- Check out what several of our members chose and while you're there tells us what you would select- @forty_caliber finished his drying kiln. He has really thought this through and looks like the internal environment will really do the job- There's a bunch more photos in his post along with descriptions of the controls he is using- @jthornton continues to work on his chevron bowls. He took the time to perfect the accuracy and it shows in the alignment of the design- JT's post takes us along through the glue-up and turning process. Please check it out! You may remember from last week that JT's original idea for this design was to create "popcorn bowls". As with all turners, design changes are part of the game. Check out what JT decided to do with the popcorn bowl design- JT was also one of the lucky winners of our Ward 57 raffle. He tells us about the prize we won - @HandyDan posted information about a great deal from Penn State Industries and gave us a look at how he modified a set of chuck jaws to suit his needs. From PSI- The link-https://www.pennstateind.com/store/CUG3418CCX.html?utm_source=Google_Shopping&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=&utm_term=CUG3418CCX&gclid=Cj0KCQiAq5meBhCyARIsAJrtdr70ldWCA_YmLJ606Nrzu2Q_cEi44g6K3bWv-v2lWtTpmg-0b7wwgpAaAksvEALw_wcB @Steve Krumanaker can't wait for Christmas! He has already started on his ornaments for 2023! I love these little birdhouses. What’s Coming Up- Click on the images for links to more information and registration- Cindy Drozda does a lot of free online programs. Her only request is that you signup for her emails. Click on the image to get to the signup page For The Newbies- Keeping your lathe Morris Tapers clean is important to ensure the centers don't slip. You can buy brushes but Mike Peace shows us how to make one- Lyle Jamieson demonstrates how to create an Koa crotch bowl with undercut rim. This is a piece of beautiful wood. The techniques can be used on any species. Expand Your Horizons- From the AAW, this quite long video from a live demonstration by Al Stirt. He demonstrates carved square platters Adding threads to a lidded box can add another level of pizzazz to your turnings. The following three videos offer several considerations. @jthornton showed us his segmenting procedures. This video from Jim Rodgers shows his methods of designing, cutting, gluing and turning. Within the video, there is mention of software that can be used to assist in design and calculations. The link to WoodturnerPro software- https://www.woodturnerpro.com/ New Turning Items- Not specifically a turning item but Starbond Adhesives has released a new odorless thin CA. From their website- NO-05 Starbond Infiltrant Odorless Thin CA Glue is a 3D printer infiltrant that is fumeless, odorless, and hypoallergenic. This watery-thin adhesive is perfect for getting into those hard-to-reach hairline fractures, pores, and narrow slots. Our NO-05 is ideal for porous materials such as foam, soft wood (balsa), ceramics, unpolished minerals, and fossils. Often used as a glossy finish, this glue can be sanded, then polished to perfection! Using capillary action, the NO-05 glue works wonders on inlay applications as it penetrates and stabilizes the material. Click on the above image for the like to the product page. Everything Else- Not sure what happened to Rick Morris (Rick Turns). His weekly list of YouTube woodturning videos has been missing for a while. Hope he is OK.
  2. So, I was thinking (yes, that means you should run screaming into the night). When I'm drilling holes for my fretwork, I drill a lot of holes. If I'm using the drill press (preferred method) I can only support the piece I'm drilling with one hand. The other hand has to pull the drill bit down into the wood. I want to rig up a jig when a rod extends from the drill press handle to a foot pedal that will pull the spindle down and when released the drill press handle will raise back up, this would allow me to have both hands on the piece of wood for more control. Since I'm using 1/16 inch and smaller drill bits there is little danger of the work piece being pulled out of my grip. I have used a molding chopper and a double miter saw that used this technique (factory built for it) so the concept has been used in the past. What do you thnk? A picture of the double lidded basket showing all the holes to be drilled:
  3. Several years ago I made a couple of walking canes for my wife and myself. I used 1" dia pine stock from HD and some spalted Apple (maybe Maple) plus an exotic wood for the handle. I shaped the shaft with the sander and stained it. I stained the shaft and finished it all with a nice clear shiny finish. It was very cold at the time and I set them aside. Many things have occured and they stayed stored in a corner for a long time. A couple of days ago we went for a hike and I took the canes with us. I wanted to see what adjustments needed to be made in length and comfort. I knew they were too long. I discovered much more needed adjusted for me. My handle was made all wrong form my hands. It was to thick and the shape pushed my fingers together. Another big thing was the finish, it was too slick. I removed the handle and put it back on the lathe. Then put ridges and valleys in for my fingers. I shaped it to accommodate the variances in my hands by turning valleys and then grasping it with my hand for comfort. I kept doing this until it felt good for my hand size and irregularities. After reassembly and cut to length, I applied a non slippery clear finish. We are happy with them and did discover that they are really nice to walk with. They help with balance and catch us if we trip. At our age, that is a big plus.
  4. Research on the strings for tops didn't yield much. All I found is that the length of the string matters. It said 60" was a good length but did not specify the thickness of the string. I have a spool of nylon sash cord for blinds and started out using it. It is made of nylon and I found it may be too slippery. I got the tops working well with it after some practice but thought the kids may not have the ability or patience for that . I went looking for some type of cotton cord but didn't find anything local thick enough. I did find balls of natural cord at Hobby Lobby that looked good but not thick enough either. I bought it anyway with the thought I may be able to spin two strands together using the same technique I used for the Yo-Yos. Gave it a shot and it worked well with a cord .140" thick. The sash cord was .100 inches thick. After the first cord was made I knew I had a winner. The tops worked easier and I attribute that not only to the thicker cord but to the fact that the cord ended up closer to the outside diameter of the top which theoretically would get the top spinning easier right off the bat when thrown. So here is how I made them. I cut a 152" length of the cord shown and tied a knot in each end. The cord is three strands and I took large paper clips and hooked a strand on each end. I hooked one end on a stationary hook and the other end on a hook inserted in my drill. I twisted the cord running the drill in forward/clockwise motion until the length shortened up 24". While spinning it with the drill I kept moderate pressure on it holding back on the drill enough to keep the slack and whip out of the cord. Once it is 24" shorter there is plenty of twist and will knot up with the speed of light if constant tension is not held on it. Now the drill end has to be removed from the drill and put on the stationary hook with the other end. The drill hook has to be holding the half way mark as you do this. My arms are long enough that I could hook the string with the drill and move the end without it knotting. It would have been easier with a second person but I found it doable. Now that the cord is hooked halfway the drill has to be switched into reverse and spun in a counterclockwise direction. For some reason the cord gets longer as it is reverse spun and after spinning it for a while it will start to shorten up again. When this happens the top string is done. Put a knot big enough in one end to catch the string when winding and a finger loop or a button for the back of the fingers which ever you prefer. Oddly enough the string wound the way it is pictured above at the suggested 60" and the tops spin well. How about two at a time?
  5. I took the saw off the Dewalt radial arm and built a plate to hold a router. Next I used a geared down forward-reverse motor and put it in the place of the hand crank back on the top rear that use to raise and lower the saw. I then mounted the forward -reverse switch under the table in front so I could raise and lower the router with my knees as I held the wood I was working on... So instead of on and off, it raises and lowers the router.. I quickly learned I needed some help so I wouldn't forget which knee made it go which direction...the reason for the up and down on each side... The glove is there to keep my head from banging on the end of the arm while concentrating on what the router and bit is doing. This set up did take away trying to free hand a router on certain task...
  6. I wanted to sit as I turned on my mini. I had to remove a lot of stuff and make some major changes. The lathe center is about my elbow level and . the base is 25inches from the floor. I am still moving my tools and rearranging. If the stool is too high, I see that HF has an adjustable one. My stool is 24" and the HF one is from 15 to 20" Haven't had time to turn, clean up and honey dos
  7. For some time I've wanted a slow speed on my Jet mini. About a year ago I purchased a light weight 18 volt drill, I really like it and quit using my old Sears drills........just to heavy and the batteries don't stay charged. I was recharging one of the old ones and walked by my lathe. I wondered, can I adapt this old angle drill to my lathe. It was almost a perfect fit with a dowel in it. I shimmed the lathe and it works perfectly and has speed adjustment. I've only got to use it once and really like finishing my work. It is not lined up or inserted in the picture
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