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Found 220 results

  1. Just completed,...horn is by Bill Smith and myself. Tiger maple base plug.
  2. I'm building some walnut bedside tables with 24" circular tops. For visual interest...and because it'll be fun... I'd like to use 12 alternating maple and walnut angled segments in a sun burst pattern. Ive gotten far enough to understand that the angles need to be 30°...I think. Do I cut each angle side at 15° ? Please help a mathematically challenged old man. And, muchas gracias!!!
  3. Haven't figured out what it might be but at least I got the wood prepared and the pattern glued on and cut out with the scroll saw... I got to figure out what it will be as I start grinding stuff away!
  4. Yesterday son and I made some Pull Out Shelving for mama, see proceeding link. And while cutting down the panel for the shelves, we had to do some cross cutting of ply on my Shopsmith. I was pleasantly, actually, very very happy, to see the quality of cut that was produced on the smith with the blade I used. Also this cut was made without a zero clearance insert, I just had on the factory insert, and the quality was perfect, I was very impressed. I don't remember getting this good a cut even on my 12" 5hp Grizz cabinet saw using an 80 tooth Amana Blue melamine blade. I am not sure what happened here, but really, I was not expecting such a great cut, so there are several factors in play here. And I'll list them. Quality of ply, the ply we are using is excellent, prefinished maple ply Made in the USA. Just great stuff. So the finish is binding the maple veneer which may be preventing tear out. Shopsmith 60 tooth 10" blade The variable speed on my smith, I had it set at "R" or 3500 RPM, (not sure if that is arbor speed or tooth speed) Given that, I am sure the factors created a concert for a perfect cut, I'll have to test the cut on some less desirable ply, and see if that makes a difference. But boy was I happy. Again, no zero clearance insert here. Something really cool about the smith, is the variable speed, so I could have done some test cuts, and played with the speed a little to get the best cut, but in this case the first cut was perfect. I just used the Shopsmith speed chart, they did not list ply in the chart, so I chose the setting for softwood thinking ply is equivalent possibly to soft wood. My Shopsmith keeps giving me surprises like this frequently, just when I think I have pushed the limits of the smith, something like this happens, and it just makes me feel better about giving up my dedicated machinery as I had, and the smith in its place. I am not advocating the idea that the smith can take the place of dedicated machinery, I don't wholly agree with that, machinery made for a specific use is going to be much better and more efficient, typically, but for those who are considering a Shopsmith in order to save space, or you moved to more confined quarters, or just to add one to your arsenal of machinery, the cut quality on ply, may not have to be a concern during your deliberations. That being said, for my use, and my tight quarters (car in garage at night) I could not imagine another machine in my shop, or needing another machine, I have had this machine for two years now, while I needed to adjust my brain around it, and the sequence of work, yes there was an adjustment period, and a honeymoon period, and a disappointment period that was due mainly to my own ignorance on how the machine works, and its capabilities. But at this time after using it for two years, and learning its operations, I am happy. And it keeps surprising me, pleasantly. Image below is the top side of the cut Image below is the underside of the cut I used this Shopsmith 1 1/4" arbor 60 tooth cross cut blade. The blade below is from their website, but I used this exact same one.
  5. Pauley

    Silver maple

    The largest platter I’ve ever turned. A 15 inch silver maple platter. I turned this on my Laguna Revo 1216 lathe on the outboard side. A bit nerve racking doing it. First I used the worm screw in the chuck and I probably should have used a face plate...once I had the bottom done and made the tenon for the chuck, it was easier hogging out the inside. I’m pleased with the way it came out...and so is my wife! I sanded up to 4000 grit, then used triple e and finally Aussie oil. Hope you folks like it...
  6. Here's a Join or Die and BFranklin snake on a flatty,.......snake only on a matching primer. Horns by Bill Smith and myself. Base plugs are tiger maple as usual
  7. I made 5 of these shaker oval boxes. They’re #3s and are made from Curley maple. I’ve made about 30 of different sizes before and we’re all cherry, but I wanted to try some maple to see how well it bends...and it was great. Sanded to 220 and still need to add a finish. I think I’ll use some watch danish oil...wait three days and apply some poly. I’m actually going to try and sell these, but not sure how much to ask. I was thinking 20 buck a piece.
  8. Pauley

    Rolling pin

    Well, this is my first rolling pin of any kind. When I do something for the first time, I jump in and try the most difficult thing. This was “supposed to be a Celtic knot rolling pin. It looks more like a drunken knot...ha ha....I thought turning the taper would be difficult, but it wasn’t to bad. I know there must be a way of doing it....anyhow here is a photo of it. It’s Curley maple with walnut inlays...
  9. First batch of ornaments for the year. Mostly maple, cherry, and walnut, there are a couple sycamore globes. There is one sea urchin ornament, that one has ebony finials. We spent a few days on Jacksonville beach with my wife's brother and his wife. Two of our best friends in the world. Picked some sea urchins and this ornament will go to them as a remembrance. Most of these are dyed "inside out". A couple local gift shops sell a few of these and those are the most popular. To me, it's hard beat just plain wood grain. Thanks for looking! Steve
  10. From the album: John Morris's Hand Tools

    I got in the shop a little and decided to make my own layout tools, starting with the ever so useful 6" square. Since it's the most used size in my work, it's a good jumping off point. Then I'll create a smaller 3" followed up by a few larger squares. I love how this one feels, and you know what? No more accidental scratching or marring of wood surfaces like you may get with steel squares.
  11. Have a current order for honey dippers, this is the first batch of 20 finished. Some of the these have some really nice grain in the lids. Steve
  12. John Morris

    Curly Maple Chest

    From the album: 18th Century Connecticut Blanket Chest

    Installing the mortised lock was interesting, having to do it after the entire chest was finished was a tad stressful to say the least. But it does lock, and looks wonderful.
  13. From the album: John Morris's Hand Tools

    I built this square from left over Walnut from some project eons ago, and the Curly Maple is scrap from a Shaker Rocker I am currently building. The two pins are of Walnut as well. They are through-pins.
  14. Again. Not quite sure what will come out of there...yet. Have a lot of candy bar sized pieces of Walnut.... Couple pieces of Curly Maple.... A few pieces of White oak and some Pine.. Most are about ..1/2" thick or so. Been using a plane to square them up a bit......have to watch when I pull the plane back......the front end of the plane would slip off the end of the board, and then a finger gets cut from the sharp corners of the board. OW! needed to slow it down a notch. No pictures just yet, still not sure WHAT sort of thing the Single Brain Cell Sketch Up will come up with.....stay tuned.
  15. Related Topics Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 1 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 2 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 3 (Curly Maple) Shaker Transitional Rocker Part 4 (Curly Maple) Today I was able to get back in the shop and focus on this chair that has been lingering for some time now. What spurred this, is we need money. My oldest daughter who is in her senior year of college is going to be heading out next summer on missionary work overseas. So hopefully I'll be a little busy in the old shop over the next 10 months or so earning some extra funds to help pay for this big trip. She is giving violin lessons as well to pay her way, but I want to help her. We are very excited for her, yet at the same time apprehensive, the nations they are talking about going to aren't the most pleasant nations, but most locations that missionaries go too aren't, otherwise their wouldn't be a need. So, once I finish the chair, it'll go either to two locations, if the students get a fundraising auction together I'll donate the chair to the auction, if not, I'll sell it, and move on to another. Today I worked on the seat. You'll see just a few of the things needed for seat weaving in the image below. A chair that needs a seat of course. Scissors for cutting the tape and filling, No.3 upholstery nails, and a shuttle to feed the tape through while weaving the woof (explanation to follow) So in seat weaving there are two facets to weaving, and they are obvious, you need to weave from back to front first, and then cross weave from side to side last. For square shaped seats it may not matter, but it is tradition to weave front to back first, then side to side in any checkerboard, herringbone and diamond pattern weave. Please see a couple definitions below. Warp - The WARP is one length of tape wrapped around the seat rails from front to back. Woof - The WOOF is one length of tape wrapped around the seat rails from side to side and woven under and over the warp in a checkerboard, herringbone or diamond pattern. To start the Warp one end is placed at the back inside corner of the side rail, and nailed in place. I first set the No.3 nail with a slight tap of a small hammer as I had in image above. Then with a pair of channel locks I squeeze the nail in place, instead of hammering it in place. Some folks will hammer the nail in place but I like the method of squeezing it in place, I'd rather not beat on the chair if I don't have too. After the first nail is in place, I simply feed the roll of tape over and under the back and front seat rungs, this is the easiest and quickest portion of this job, since we don't have to be concerned about actually weaving, just wrapping, it goes quick. In image below the Warp is in loosely. You may notice my seat rungs are not finished, that was on purpose, unfinished seat rungs tend to grip the fabric tape more, and hold it in place. You'll see in image below I measured the distance from the front leg to the tape, and I'll make sure the distance is the same on the other side as well. So we have about 2 5/8" on both sides, close enough for this work. After grabbing each and every Warp and giving it a firm pull to tighten them up, I clamped the last front Warp to the front seat rung, to hold it in place while I nail off the last Warp to the other side seat rung. All tightened up and nailed off. Next I fit and cut to size the batten for the seat cushion. In the old days they used feather filled pillows. Some folks still use a pillow filled with their choice of softness, I am using polyester fill batten from JoAnne's Fabric. I have seen other weavers use small already made pillows available at JoAnne's Fabric as well, my next chair I will use the pillow, I like the idea of the pillow. The book I read to learn how to build these chairs by Kerry Peirce, he uses the method I am using, so being the student, I just followed his example. After I sized the batten, I stuffed it carefully between the Warp. There it is, all in place. Once the Woof is woven, you won't see hide nor hair of the batten, it will be locked in place and hidden. So tomorrow I plan on getting the side areas filled in for the Warp weave, they have to be separate strips cut to length, and then nailed in place to fill in the side triangle areas, then I can start weaving the Woof. Here is an interesting tidbit of word play. EDIT 11-11-19: See the continuation of this seat process at the REPLY.
  16. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    This is the first time I have played with actually photographing my work in a more professional way, with the help of my kids, I think we did pretty good. This chair was another fun build, I just love these chairs.
  17. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    If anyone has an critiques regarding the photography of this chair, please share, I want to learn how to photograph work like this. Thanks!
  18. From the album: Shaker Furniture

    The seat is checkerboard weaved, with 5/8" fabric tape available at Shaker Chair Tape WWW.SHAKERWORKSHOPS.COM Copyright © 2019, Shaker Workshops
  19. lew

    Turned Kitchen Scoops

    So I'm down to making gifts for the nurses at my doctor's office. I rarely visit the office for a "Sick Call" but I do take care of their computers. It's always an inconvenience for the nurses when I have to interrupt their routines, so I try and make up for it by making each of them a little something every year. My sister gave me this idea a couple of years ago when she gifted me a turned scoop and I've been meaning to make some ever since. I had some walnut and maple boards left from previous projects so they got glued into turning blanks. Some were all walnut and some were walnut and maple combinations. Mounted between lathe centers, I turned a chuck tenon on each blank. Over the years, I got tired of measuring the calipers every time I turned a chuck tenon so I made this quick little helper jig to make the measurements. One side is for the tenon, the other side of the jig is for measuring for the outside of the chuck mounting. Sizing the tenon As I was making a bunch of these, I do each operation to all of the blanks before moving on to the next step. Next, removed the drive center and replaced it with the chuck and prepared to drill out the bulk of the material for the scoops. The first hole was just under 2" in diameter (my largest Forstner bit) this hole set the depth of the scoop. Because I wanted the "back" of the scoop to be more rounded, I needed to also set the depth limit of that portion as well. I used my shop made drilling gauge to finish out the settings. Finished drilling The blanks were then remounted in the chuck in preparation for completing the insides. To assure the blanks get centered properly, I made a cone adapter that fits over the tail stock live center Once securely chucked, The cone is pulled out and work can begin enlarging and shaping the inside. Each of the square blanks were slightly different dimensions, so every scoop was unique. I did sand the inside of each blank as it was shaped using my shop made ball sander. The ball sander is from Mr. David Reed Smith. You can read the free instructions here- http://www.davidreedsmith.com/articles/foamballsander/foamballsander.htm. Once the inside was sanded, the outside of the blank was rounded, using the cone for support. I have several of these cones- of different sizes- and they really come in handy. To be able to shape the outside of the scoops, I needed to reference to depth of the rounded "back". A simple depth indicator does the trick. (Notice the black indicator mark near the chuck end of the blank. I have gotten into the habit of marking my blanks with a reference mark that aligns with a reference mark on the chuck. This assures the blanks are always remounted in the same orientation in the chuck.) The depth of the recess is transferred to the outside of the rounded blank. The blanks are all marked and read for shaping. Set the overall length, and shape the scoops When I finished the shaping and sanding, I had 9 "bells" of which I forgot to take a picture. Anyway, To convert the "bells" into scoops, I needed to cut each one on the bandsaw. Problem here was trying to safely hold each one and to be sure the cut was vertical across the scoop opening. To accomplish this I made a jig to hold the scoop. The following pictures describe the process- This hole was drilled almost through the blank and then enlarged to match the average diameter of the scoops. A piece of 1/4" plywood in tacked to one of the jaws of the wooden screw clamp and one half of the drilled block is also attached to that jaw. The opposite jaw with attached half block is free to move. The jig and its' base made it easy to cut the curved profile on the scoop opening. All cut and ready for finish sanding With the hot bee's wax/mineral oil finish I think the presents are done for this year. A few extra scoops in case we need a quick present- or I forgot some one! Thanks for following along!
  20. Pauley

    Lidded box

    I just finished turning this lidded box on my new Laguna Revo 12/16 lathe. What an awesome lathe it is! this is a Curley maple lidded box with a bloodwood top and maple finial. I’m thinking I should have made the finial a little thinner, but not sure. I sanded from 80 grit to 4000 grit. Then went over it with Triple E and then used Aussie Oil for the final finish. This is the first time I worked with bloodwood and it is very hard, which surprised me as I thought Purple Heart was extremely hard...but the bloodwood is probably just as hard. But it finishes beautifully. Feel free to criticize...especially on the finial. I’m not to good at doing them...
  21. Local habitat store had some dowel rods for a buck a piece. Got these Maple and Cherry ones in my stash now.
  22. Years ago I made a cabinet for a local customer, who became my friend. I have the cabinet in our gallery here. I put out the call on Facebook to see if any of my local buddies had a truck leaf spring I could have to build a Froe with. My buddy who I made this cabinet for answered back with a big yes. He is restoring his 1942 Ford Jeep he's had since he was a teen and he purchased new springs. He's 69 years old today. My son and I went over to his home this morning to pick up my leaf spring and while there I found the cabinet I built right where I installed it a few years ago. Just thought I'd take a couple pictures of it this morning and show it off here, I still love this piece. This project was one of those times I really hated seeing one leave my shop. He collects Pewter Molds among many other interests. Curly Maple purchased from Bob Kloes Lumber, dyed with Transfast Colonial Maple, one coat of BLO, one coat of shellac, and one coat of oil based varnish. I don't remember the cut of shellac I used, and I don't remember the varnish brand.
  23. Dale Felice

    Maple rustic chair 3

    From the album: Construction projects

    Front view.
  24. I had the best birthday I ever had. For the first time I corralled my lovely little granddaughters into the shop to make a couple of hot plate fish shape trivets for their mother. She'd been feeling poorly and I told the little girls that there's nuthin in the world that makes a mommy feel better about things than gifts from their babies that were made by their babys hands with love care and diligence. So we selected from shapes of fish I snarfed off the WWW and got some apple and maple logs (yes that's right we started with logs - short ones, but logs just the same) and resawed and jointed and planed and ripped strips and crosscut pieces of the contrasting color wood. Then we glued up the pieces and left them over night and the next day - - - Yah it was a two day job. The next day we changed the band saw blade together and I showed em how to transfer laser printouts to wood using acetone then with the fish images properly transferred I held them close with my hands on theirs and guided them while they took their work pieces and sawed the fish shapes out on the band saw. Then it was off to the bench for an hour or so of sanding and stroking with files and wood shaped and strips to get the edge contours just right. And they signed them with a wood burn in a discrete place. That night we all had a birthday / new years eve party. It was the best birthday ever. And of course mommy was most pleased.
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