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Found 17 results

  1. I ran across this collection of tips, tricks, jigs, etc from Mike Peace. He explains this is a rehash of some earlier tips that he thinks he didn't do a good a job of presenting them as he could. The video is about 31 minutes long. The video was listed on the September Woodturning Online Newsletter.
  2. I have the first edition and Jim Tolpin has written an updated version. I did not read the whole book, just looked at the pictures . Well I did read some because I have made several jigs from the books and still use them today. The jigs and other tips are very well illustrated and information is easy to understand to build the jigs. I would recommend this for anyone from newbie to experienced woodworker. He covers everything from tuneup , blades, jigs, crosscuts ripping , accessories, and grooves and dados and much more. You can get it as low as 1.99 at Barnes and Noble or 4.99 at Thrift Books. I have on my saw the magic fence pictured below. it can be added to for tenon jig that can do more than tenon.
  3. Bailing wire was once was considered the best known method responsible for the making the American west. Today that has changed by the advent of Duct tape, Super glue, Velcro, as wood crafters Hi tech screws & biscuts. But below I have a helper to act as a second pair of hands for the guy that works by himself in a wood shop, that makes boxes into anything. These supports are similar to those my Grandfather had. The dimensions for each bracket are 3" wide 7" long and 7" tall and made from 1/2 Baltic Birch ply wood as my preferred material for shop jigs & fixtures, for the most part. A base accepts two supports, and is the same width and twice the length (1/2" x3" x 14"). You can go longer but for storage sake I saw no reason because you have so much adjustment. You can leave a tail if you want to clamp the fixture to you work table. My work tables are replaceable so I screw a lot of my fixtures directly to the table. When I get real anal retentive I use a spoil board to attach the fixtures. The base has 4 holes in it. Two of which hold in my case 1/4" " Tee nuts which the first bore in sequence is a counter bore so the t nut will be more than flush with the bottom. In this scenario the counter bore is 3/4' diameter and 3/32" deep centered 2" in from the end. A second pair of "T" nuts can be added down the line but I never found that necessary. The "T" nut holes center treadled shaft required a 5/16" bore to be bored in the center of the "t" nut counter bore. I used a fence and a stop for the counter bore in the same setting for both. I then placed the stop in 1" with the 5/16 bit to bore holes on each end to hang the finished fixtures for storage. Because I am the way that I am a slight counter sink bit cleaned the holes with a slight chamfer. The photo below shows the bases top & bottom. On the supports box joints were used in the 90 degree corner and a 1/4" dado runs parallel the length 1/4" deep and 1/2" in from the edges to accept 1/4" birch plywood corner bracing to maintain a 90 degree angle. A single 1/4 slot is created centered and about 1†from each end it is stopped. This is done on half the support arms to facilitate the adjustment knob & bolt for adjusting the supports in & out. It is a easy task on a router table with stop blocks. A ¼ hole was bored in the path prior as a starter hole. Once the material is finish milled a dry fit is to routing is made. Make double sure in the dry fit process all your joinery is consistent and accurate. The assembly would be matching the two support pieces aligning the dados. Glue is put in the corner joint and the dado. Place the 1/4 ply angle supports in the bottom dados inset about 1/8 from the edge where the corner comes together. Now draw the two support pieces to form the 90 degree angle with the upright of the corner to enter in its dado mate. Remember I said the lower one is only about 1/8 of an inch from the end of the support? That wont allow the support arm pieces to seat into their corner purposely. This is so when you clamp the corner into fit the plywood is firmly and completely seated in that dado. Working in your glue up time, make sure all is aligned and you have solid seated joints. Check the 90 degree angle with a square and make adjustments as needed. This is not the time find your milling is sloppy so make double sure in the dry fit process all your joinery is consistent and accurate. Once I find the support arm is square and all is in place I toe nail a pin front & back, top & bottom of both the angle bracket where it meets the dado penetrating the bracket and the support arm. After assembling the support arms turn your attention to installing the two nuts into the counter bored holes. This production used ¼ x 2 carriage bolts, washers & ¼ threaded mini knobs. The bolts are threaded through the top of the mini knob completely, and a washer is placed over the other end of the bolt and the bolt is inserted through the slot and threaded deep enough to sufficiently garb but not protrude beyond the base bottom side. Now you can use your preference of corner clamps to handle the task at hand. My final thing would storage of these awkward devices. Remember the other holes that I chamfered with a countersink bit, on the ends of the base? They hang like ducks in a row. By Brad Vickery copyright.
  4. When making the .30-06 pen with the Zebra F-301 pen I start by taking the pen apart and removing the stainless tube. Take the pen apart and remove the tube with the logo on it. There is a detent on the tube so a half twist before pulling works best. I use a small pair of end nippers to grab the tube. I slide them into the hole the open pliers make and they clamp around the tube just enough to get it off. The lower ribbed part has to have 3.5 ribs turned down to fit into the shell where the bullet was. This makes the length right and the nib protrudes the correct distance when the clicker is pushed.  Mount the drill chuck and hold the ribbed section in it while the ribs are turned off. The Easy Wood Tools Ci1 square cutter works wonders for this. Next pull the clicker piece from the top of the pen. Mount a 9/64 drill bit in the drill chuck backwards and push the clicker onto it. It is a loose fit and needs pressure from the tailstock to turn it without it spinning on the bit. I have a Oneway live center and found a pencil fits into it with the center tip removed. I put enough wraps of some plastic tape on it to keep it out a small distance and turn the clicker until the chrome is sanded off to the brass underlay. I start with 220 grit and sand through 400 grit and then polish with 0000 steel wool. Be careful not to get the piece too hot as the plastic will melt. For the pen nib I took a plastic dowel I had and turned the end until it fit inside the threads and used a pointed live center to hold it in place while sanding the same way as described above. A 5/16 wood dowel can be used as well. The end of the dowel should be perfectly flat. For the .30-06 shell I remove the primer and mount it in the chuck and take the letter "O" size drill to drill through the end. To mount it for sanding I took a 5/16 bolt that was long enough to have a shoulder above the threads and cut the head off. I took a nut and ran it up to the shoulder and tightened it with a wrench so the shell wouldn't slide between the nut and bolt threads. Might want to do that before cutting the head off so it is there to hold onto. Now it is time to put the pen together and write all the love letters you been meaning to write to your significant other. I took one of the pens and made a stick pen and holder. I ran a drill bit through the bullet end of a shell to get the crimp section straight and turned the rib section as described above until it was a press fit into the shell. Put it together and found the ink cartridge was too short. I found a nail that was a tight fit into the cartridge after removing the plug and pushed it in until the right length was achieved. I DID NOT remove the primer for this one. And there you have it. No rocket science involved and a nice pen has evolved. I've already made over 80 of them. Everyone loves them. Enjoy
  5. Some of us have miter trimmer knives and sharpening the knives accurately can be a chore... I saw this iron sharpening jig elsewhere.. add drawer casters to it and adapt to hold the trimmer blades/irons and I believe you have solved an issue.. to add the caster.. ''wheel well'' for the caster wheels w/o the bracket and drift pin the wheels into place... twin keyhole/T slot the jig's face to make for adjustablity...
  6. In making my lift for the router I need a wheel that turns a small Lab scissor lift. How would I manufacture a wheel say like the Delta one pictured or something with some holes in it? Tools available are a lathe, bandsaw okay just about any tool but the skillset may be lacking with the lathe.
  7. This is my early Christmas and late birthday. Looks very solidly built.
  8. Website of shop made jigs, machines and devices.
  9. There some things on this one that I had to look closely. Very interesting
  10. I know there are 2 different type of bench grinders. High speed and low speed. Plus jigs to get the correct angles. Are you able to sharpen on a high speed bench grinder too?
  11. Collection of projects. Many free plans, some chargeable. Furniture, woodwork, and shop tools. Projects usually demonstrated on YouTube..
  12. Web-frames. What I use in a case to let drawers slide in and out. Made long before those new-fangled metal thingys ever came along. last episode, I had all the parts cut to length, to make 6 frames. Today? Well first a "prototype" was sawn out.. Yeah, a tenon. The problem today was how to make about 24 of these tenons, without a lot of time being used up. Hmmm, I have that Mitre Box, and it has depth stops I can adjust.. Right there, under the guide, is a brass collar. Loosen the set screw, and slide up until you reach the depth you want to stop at. Did both the front one, and the one in the back. I used the prototype under the saw blade, to set the depth. while the prototype was sitting there, I screwed a stop block to the deck. so, I could do the other 23 tenons' shoulder cuts, and wear out my elbow, at the same time. Slide up to the block, cut until the saw no longer cuts, flip to do the other side, flip again to do the other end. Next, needed a way to cut the cheeks of the tenons...re-saw jig on the bandsaw was slid around a bit.. I pushed each side through, until the waste just fell over, rotate or flips as needed...soon had 48 of these little scraps laying around. As for the tenons? 24 tenons were soon done( the other ends look just like these) Next, I needed another jig. Had to go and dig it out...and then "up-date " it.... The side pieces were too tall, made new, lower ones. Spacing was too wide...ok, I clamped a part and the two new sides together in the vise Drilled a few new holes for screws, and screwed the base in place. Need this attached to the bench top, right over a leg.. With a few screws. Now, I can use a pair of Visegrips finger clamps to hold a rail, while I abuse it for a bit. Chose a tenon to use for the layouts. Used a backsaw to make a couple cuts.. Sawn at an angle, so as not to overcut too much, Have another way to dig out the waste.. The mortise chisel chops down at the back, then I can just pop the waste out. The wide chisel to fine tune things as needed.. Plan was to fit each tenon to it's new home. I also marked on all the parts, which part goes where. After a few chops, I could check for square.. Let's see, that be 4 tenons fitted in place, a lot of flipping going on here. I also cut some old, nasty pine into a kicker.. A kicker is to keep a drawer fromtipping down, when you pull the drawer out a bit. While the M & T joints will get glue and nails later, the kickers will get a screw on each end, and a spot of glue. So, shop time started at 1130 hrs, and ended at 1500 hours....what did I get done? Three frames are ready to be assembled with glue, nails, and screws. First, I had to get these off the washer, before the Boss sees them. Will try to get the rest of these done, so I can clear the bench and do a lot of assembly work. Been a long afternoon...stay tuned..
  13. That to thr GrandBRATS being here and wanting to go places.....work on the Cherry Box has ground to a halt...almost. Needed to give the brain a rest for a day or two, anyway.... Jig? Well, I needed a way to plough a groove into the frame's skinny and thin parts. Hard to hold onto them AND the Stanley #45......router table? Nah, I'd have to dig it out, set it up and listen to it scream....not. Laid down a scrap of pine. Two screws, countersunk to fix it in place on the bench. Some small brads to add a couple little piece to make a square corner. Used one of the frame's parts to make sure I had clearence along the outside edge... Something like this. The screw sticking up "in the way"? Well, it helps hold things in place... I think I can run a plane along the edge to dress it up a bit. All set up for the short ends. Then I can move the screw a bit, and set up for the longer sides. Should be able to run the 45 along the edge a few times. Not talking a lot of plane effort needed to plough these grooves, Maybe 3-4 swipes per piece. I have to double check to make sure I am grooving the TOP of each piece. When I get back to the shop, we'll see how this goes. Jig is a one time use thing. I will need to build a different one when I am working on the lid's panel. Might take as long to plough four grooves as it did to make the jig. Not that I'm cheap, or anything.....I intend to re-use the jig's parts for the panel work...
  14. Charles Nicholls

    plantpotjig

    From the album: Turning Jigs

    This here is the start of my idea to make a paper pot plant maker. Using a piece of apple for the base and a piece of maple for the cup. Thanks for the idea Lew.
  15. John Moody and I were talking today about dovetail jigs. We both have the Peachtree version and the discussion got around to replacement bits and it looks like the Amana bit for the Keller system is identical to the Peachtree bit. I heard that Keller's patent ran out and Peachtree copied it. Any input on this? Anyone have a Keller system?
  16. From the album: Lew's Basement Shop

    More overhead storage

    © Lewis Kauffman

  17. From the album: Lew's Basement Shop

    More overhead storage

    © Lewis Kauffman

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