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Found 20 results

  1. Been a busy week here at the Patriot with lots going on with our turners! Our Patriot Turners- @forty_caliber showed us an oak crotch bowl he is turning. Really looks fantastic- He received lots of positive comments on this one. Here's his post- "Forty" also posted a picture of a rough turned pecan bowl. Some beautiful grain in this one! He tells us a little about it and posted a few more pictures here- @Steve Krumanaker has been busy with several turnings. The first one is a sweet looking bowl that he said ran him through the funnies! Steve explains what happen- Regardless, he received lots of positive comments. Bowls weren't the only type of turnings Steve did this week. He made another vase from the Flame Box Elder log. I love the finish he obtained on this one! Check out the comments from our gang- @AndrewB is setting up to do some resin casting. You may remember, he purchased a pressure pot sometime back. In this post, Andrew tells us about the resin he purchase. He received several comments and questions. I'll be following along on this one!! What’s Coming Up- Click on the above image for the link to more information and registration. Woodturner's Retreat- Click on the above image for more information and registration. For The Newbies- An informative short video from Mike Peace on the chuck held drive center. One of these could certainly reduce the need for removing your chuck- Looking for a fun little project? Carl Jacobson turns some honey dippers- Woodturning Monthly from the Woodworker's Journal is available- Click on the above image for the link to the newsletter Expand Your Horizons- @forty_caliber found an interesting video on bowl drying. The video's author uses a dehydrator to speed up the process. This is "Forty's" post. If you view the video on YouTube, the author has a second video with additional tests. @Gerald has posted several bowls he has turned for the Beads Of Courage group. This video is from Kent (Turn A Wooden Bowl) and demonstrates the turning process as well as providing links for getting involved- While I was at this bowl turning site, I noticed another video on end grain bowls. You can create some really impressive turning when the bowl is oriented in this position. We posted a multi-axis turning from Alan Stratton. He has updated that video with some shop made jigs. New Turning Items- Well, open those wallets! Lots of new items are hitting the market. Navigate to site links by clicking on the images Woodturners Wonders- Ron Brown's new jam chuck kit- Klingspor from the virtual AAW. Kinda long but lots of good information- Vendor showcase- Not new but really handy- Everything Else- A well deserved honor- Rick Turns list of YouTube woodturning videos from last week- Finally finished up the little walnut end grain bowl and the large cherry bowl. Both bowls have rounded lips. The bases of the bowls have a rounded foot that mimics the lip. Both finished with gloss poly and of course both were turned completely with Easy Wood Tools. Safe turning and stay well
  2. My daughter got me a couple of wood turning gifts for my birthday. One was a pizza cutter and the other was a measuring cup set. All required me to turn handles. I have posted the pizza cutter, it came out nice. The measuring handles were set up to be turned on as a pen would..........I had none of the required equipment and have no desire to make pens. I went to Youtube (Sam Angelo) and found a way to do it without any more new lathe parts. I turned a wooden headstock piece to mount the workpiece on (not sure what to call it) you can see in the first picture in the chuck. It worked fine and I was very surprised that it did with only minor slippage. I intend to use different colored woods for each of the others so if you see a red handle, you will automatically know it is a half cup measure. I do have a question. When doing the final assembly......should I use glue or will the force fit be OK?
  3. Just a gentle reminder- When posting threads, PLEASE add tags to your posts. Our Patriot Turners- @Ron Altier asked us for ideas about modifications that could be made to make his lathe run slower. He received lots of comments and suggestions. If you have any recommendations, maybe you could help him out- Ron also posted a few more ornaments he finished and explained how he made some of the marvelous designs- @RustyFN Has been really busy this week! He started out showing us a bowl he turned- Rusty used his emblem on the bottom- Rusty has been able to score free wood from several places. He told us about his trip to the saw mill where he picked up a walnut log- Which yielded this fantastic looking bowl- Check this post for more details- Rusty has a really awesome neighbor. Told Rusty he could have wood from a recently felled tree. They think it's maple- Rusty posted more images in his post and has even started turning one of the blanks. In this particular thread, there are some interesting comments on which bowl gouge might be best. Rusty decided on the 1/2" Sorby- Since Rusty is working with "green" wood, he was curious about the drying procedures and at what point in the turning process should drying take place. Our members offered several options and ideas. Maybe you could add something to what has already posted Rusty adapted a bandsaw circle cutting jig to help him cut bowl blanks- he shows us more about it in his post- We are still getting additional input on a post from a couple of weeks back on the HSS subject. Our own @Steve Krumanaker added a link to a video he made on making handles for tools. Steve posted some images of the "tea lids" which he has been making. His little laser does a fantastic job of adding embellishments to the turnings. See Steve's post for more images- Steve had to create a jig to help hold these lids during the turning process. He shared the specifics of how he made a special expansion chuck- @AndrewBreally came out smelling like a rose! A while back he obtained a bunch of tool rests- but they didn't fit his lathe. Well all was not lost as he explains in this post- @Masonsailor is still learning about his new lathe. He posted an update on some of the features- What’s Coming Up- Carl Jacobson is offering a live online class https://l.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fbit.ly%2F33zhDit%3Ffbclid%3DIwAR3dU9tbCT_bBqQRb1sbx_zaPwBi8cjcYINxqgdoYCW9EGG1zNPhckZVnII&h=AT2Nanrkmfka0_NeZU9kGjaoMGAAc7epV_E6YNxKr0sNUaSoh176gAi_5Vbc7-FG_c4rsQMCwZEZmlXk5kMhkNX9go3J_LhtqqvKbdOD488xsCVlU-JJ74id60MR01EPnA&__tn__=-UK-R&c[0]=AT0fR3DEM_uFCeZT6ING_O0GgL370DBA4CMApwnPii3gw_5CpEr0xzJg_dtKTyKgAEVOj4c1b1shbErx0WkfdpkSvv5TnUVtkgXVZhdNrboxD1S6bJznZUcPPStOa2JWTblHc8Ruit_BBPvDhTRKLtiSKEg For The Newbies- A lot of turners use the "OneWay Wolverine" sharpening system. Ron Brown shows an eas to set it up for sharpening gouges- In addition to the previous jig, Ron Brown has another jig for setting up the grinder for sharpening other tool. To get the best cuts and safest operation, we need to have the lathe running at the proper speed. In this video, Mike Peace, provides insights on when to change the lathe speed- Expand Your Horizons- Here is an interesting process for turning and coloring a "wet" blank by Alan Stratton- In the video I was intrigued by the steady rest that Mr. Stratton used. I liked the idea of being able to mount/unmount the steady rest without having to remove the turning. Here's the link to more information- https://www.aswoodturns.com/2014/09/steady-update/ New Turning Items- Ruth Niles has some new mandrel adapters for her newer stoppers- You can get more information from Ruth's site- https://nilesbottlestoppers.com/product/mandrel-adapters/?fbclid=IwAR2UmPqFG7zD_zUZhlxTuw_iK69I2_FDvVVScOJOPWna1XEncD8GX403ksw Everything Else- Rick Turns YouTube video listing from last week- Back in the summer, the tree guys dropped off some cherry. I've been making stuff from the log. Some of the pieces I rough turned, soaked in the soap solutions and then stored them in shavings. Had this shape kicking around in my head for a while. Took it out of the shavings and began working on it a week or so ago. Got it cleaned up- Started to refine the hollowing. The little shop made laser device to check the thickness- Finalizing the shape- Chuck for holding it to finish off the bottom- Mounted and secured- It was going to be pretty plain so I decided to add some detail. Hindsight is 20/20. Not sure gold leaf was the best color. More hindsite- I really don't like the glossy finish. Maybe it will darken over time- Safe turning and stay well
  4. Beautiful day here in south central Pennsylvania. Got my garlic planted and the leaves raked. Our Patriot Turners- @PostalTom added this to the general woodworking forum but it applies to turners, too. We all use glue! Thaks, Tom for a great discussion. Although he was away for a while, @Steve Krumanaker hasn't lost a bit of his turning talents. Steve gave us a peek at his birdhouse ornaments- He also posted one of his segmented birdhouses Please check out both his posts and give him your comments! @FrederickH posted an update on the African Blackwood Spill Vase. You may recall he originally wasn't too pleased with the color. After some time, the color has changed. Rick tells us more about it in this entry on his post- What’s Coming Up- In case you missed it, the David Ellsworth natural edge bowl demo is still available- Click on the above image for more details. Woodcraft is looking for volunteers for their turn pens for our troops. If you live near a Woodcraft store, you can participate at the store. You can also turn a pen at home a get it to the store. Woodcraft will give you a pen kit for each one you turn. It's a win-win all the way around! More information is available here- https://www.woodcraft.com/blog_entries/woodcraft-seeks-volunteers-to-turn-pens-for-troops?fbclid=IwAR35Fn82vh63TcyeLqoO-nDXvWQbXAnC2D6kmfM9Ed-6OKUe0ku3PxKkq40# For The Newbies- Last week we included a short video from Lyle Jamieson on turning speed. Here's another author discussing the same subject- Sam Angelo put together a video describing how and when to use certain turning tools. Looking for a nice gift idea? The patterns are free and available from- https://www.woodworkersjournal.com/turned-spatula-and-spoon-pattern/ Expand Your Horizons- Carl Jacobson turned a large hollow vase. Notice the use of some of the recently available Easy Wood Tools @Jim from Easy Wood Tools . The new parting tool and the new larger hollowing tools. All are available at the Easy Wood Tools website. Mike Peace has a video demonstrating a bandsaw jig for processing logs. If you've ever tried to feed a round log through your bandsaw and had it grab, you'll appreciate this jig- New Turning Items- Looking for a new lathe? I have just the thing! If you use CBN wheels on your grinder, Ken Rizza (Woodturners Wonders) has a product that may help you extend the life of the wheel- While you are checking out the Slick Stick, look at their Outlet Products- https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/outlet-products Ruth Niles has a new stopper specifically made for larger openings- Check out her website for more details- https://nilesbottlestoppers.com/product/cosmopolitan-ss-1000/ Everything Else- One turner we feature here often is Tim Yoder. Well Tim has some really big news! Looks like we will beeing lots more of his tremendous videos! Rick Turns list of Youtube turning videos from last week- I haven't had much time to be in the shop these last couple of week and when I did get there it was not all pleasant. As I mentioned before, I've been experimenting with soap/water soak on rough turned bowls. For the most part, the results have been very positive as far as cracking/splitting during the drying process. I'm also very please with the small amount of warping taking place. I made a bunch of small cherry test bowls. These were between 5" and 6" in diameter. After they reached moisture equilibrium I checked the roundness. The red circle is a tracing of the bowl opening and the pencil circle was drawn with a compass. Slightly warped but not much. Unfortunately, these two bowls had other ideas about what they were going to do- The one on the right may be salvageable with some sort of a creative embellishment. Before all this happened, I was have great fun with the finishing cuts on the outside of the bowls. I was comparing the the finish left from a freshly sharpened bowl gouge- using a shear scraping cut and a new carbide cutter on my full sized Easy Wood Tools finisher. Easy Wood Cutter- Bowl Gouge Pretty similar. Safe turning and stay well
  5. In making my lift for the router I need a wheel that turns a small Lab scissor lift. How would I manufacture a wheel say like the Delta one pictured or something with some holes in it? Tools available are a lathe, bandsaw okay just about any tool but the skillset may be lacking with the lathe.
  6. This is a re-post on the Celtic Knot Rolling Pin. I am a fan of “Cook Book” style instructions so if I miss any details, please let me know and I will try to flesh them out. In addition, many of these photos/procedures have been refined over time and I will try to point them out by adding extra photos rather than rewriting the entire blog. I thought it best to start with the jigs I used to prepare the turning blanks. Please note that I always over engineer everything and hardly ever see the obvious or the easy way to do something so if you see an easier way- go for it! The first jig is one I made a while back, when I first started thinking about this project. I try to make jigs that have several uses. This one was also used to make the Cheese Knife Handles. Special Diagonal Cutting Jig Sled has 2 movable fences to change the angle of the cut and position of the blank. Toggle clamp holds blank during cutting operation Top view- Bottom View- The long extension is a stop to prevent the jig from being pushed too far. That’s because I wasn’t paying attention to what I was doing and pushed the jig too far thru the saw. Disassembled Fences- Top of the angle fence Bottom of the angle fence- Bottom of the length stop- Top of the length stop, in place- Partially Assembled Fences- The spacers on the bolts elevate the wing nuts above the rolling pin blank to make adjustments easier. The bright pink tape improves visibility as the blank is aligned to the layout marks on the tape. Notice the single narrow saw kerf. The pin blank is cut with three passes thru the saw; using spacers to offset the pin blank on each pass. Several woodworkers suggested that using a dado blade would allow the cut to be made in one pass. My dado set isn't large enough in diameter to get the height needed to cut the slot. Also, the pattern of the Celtic Knot can be varied by making just two single passes. The spacers create a 3/8" slot at the fish of the third pass.
  7. I ran across this collection of tips, tricks, jigs, etc from Mike Peace. He explains this is a rehash of some earlier tips that he thinks he didn't do a good a job of presenting them as he could. The video is about 31 minutes long. The video was listed on the September Woodturning Online Newsletter.
  8. I have the first edition and Jim Tolpin has written an updated version. I did not read the whole book, just looked at the pictures . Well I did read some because I have made several jigs from the books and still use them today. The jigs and other tips are very well illustrated and information is easy to understand to build the jigs. I would recommend this for anyone from newbie to experienced woodworker. He covers everything from tuneup , blades, jigs, crosscuts ripping , accessories, and grooves and dados and much more. You can get it as low as 1.99 at Barnes and Noble or 4.99 at Thrift Books. I have on my saw the magic fence pictured below. it can be added to for tenon jig that can do more than tenon.
  9. Bailing wire was once was considered the best known method responsible for the making the American west. Today that has changed by the advent of Duct tape, Super glue, Velcro, as wood crafters Hi tech screws & biscuts. But below I have a helper to act as a second pair of hands for the guy that works by himself in a wood shop, that makes boxes into anything. These supports are similar to those my Grandfather had. The dimensions for each bracket are 3" wide 7" long and 7" tall and made from 1/2 Baltic Birch ply wood as my preferred material for shop jigs & fixtures, for the most part. A base accepts two supports, and is the same width and twice the length (1/2" x3" x 14"). You can go longer but for storage sake I saw no reason because you have so much adjustment. You can leave a tail if you want to clamp the fixture to you work table. My work tables are replaceable so I screw a lot of my fixtures directly to the table. When I get real anal retentive I use a spoil board to attach the fixtures. The base has 4 holes in it. Two of which hold in my case 1/4" " Tee nuts which the first bore in sequence is a counter bore so the t nut will be more than flush with the bottom. In this scenario the counter bore is 3/4' diameter and 3/32" deep centered 2" in from the end. A second pair of "T" nuts can be added down the line but I never found that necessary. The "T" nut holes center treadled shaft required a 5/16" bore to be bored in the center of the "t" nut counter bore. I used a fence and a stop for the counter bore in the same setting for both. I then placed the stop in 1" with the 5/16 bit to bore holes on each end to hang the finished fixtures for storage. Because I am the way that I am a slight counter sink bit cleaned the holes with a slight chamfer. The photo below shows the bases top & bottom. On the supports box joints were used in the 90 degree corner and a 1/4" dado runs parallel the length 1/4" deep and 1/2" in from the edges to accept 1/4" birch plywood corner bracing to maintain a 90 degree angle. A single 1/4 slot is created centered and about 1†from each end it is stopped. This is done on half the support arms to facilitate the adjustment knob & bolt for adjusting the supports in & out. It is a easy task on a router table with stop blocks. A ¼ hole was bored in the path prior as a starter hole. Once the material is finish milled a dry fit is to routing is made. Make double sure in the dry fit process all your joinery is consistent and accurate. The assembly would be matching the two support pieces aligning the dados. Glue is put in the corner joint and the dado. Place the 1/4 ply angle supports in the bottom dados inset about 1/8 from the edge where the corner comes together. Now draw the two support pieces to form the 90 degree angle with the upright of the corner to enter in its dado mate. Remember I said the lower one is only about 1/8 of an inch from the end of the support? That wont allow the support arm pieces to seat into their corner purposely. This is so when you clamp the corner into fit the plywood is firmly and completely seated in that dado. Working in your glue up time, make sure all is aligned and you have solid seated joints. Check the 90 degree angle with a square and make adjustments as needed. This is not the time find your milling is sloppy so make double sure in the dry fit process all your joinery is consistent and accurate. Once I find the support arm is square and all is in place I toe nail a pin front & back, top & bottom of both the angle bracket where it meets the dado penetrating the bracket and the support arm. After assembling the support arms turn your attention to installing the two nuts into the counter bored holes. This production used ¼ x 2 carriage bolts, washers & ¼ threaded mini knobs. The bolts are threaded through the top of the mini knob completely, and a washer is placed over the other end of the bolt and the bolt is inserted through the slot and threaded deep enough to sufficiently garb but not protrude beyond the base bottom side. Now you can use your preference of corner clamps to handle the task at hand. My final thing would storage of these awkward devices. Remember the other holes that I chamfered with a countersink bit, on the ends of the base? They hang like ducks in a row. By Brad Vickery copyright.
  10. When making the .30-06 pen with the Zebra F-301 pen I start by taking the pen apart and removing the stainless tube. Take the pen apart and remove the tube with the logo on it. There is a detent on the tube so a half twist before pulling works best. I use a small pair of end nippers to grab the tube. I slide them into the hole the open pliers make and they clamp around the tube just enough to get it off. The lower ribbed part has to have 3.5 ribs turned down to fit into the shell where the bullet was. This makes the length right and the nib protrudes the correct distance when the clicker is pushed.  Mount the drill chuck and hold the ribbed section in it while the ribs are turned off. The Easy Wood Tools Ci1 square cutter works wonders for this. Next pull the clicker piece from the top of the pen. Mount a 9/64 drill bit in the drill chuck backwards and push the clicker onto it. It is a loose fit and needs pressure from the tailstock to turn it without it spinning on the bit. I have a Oneway live center and found a pencil fits into it with the center tip removed. I put enough wraps of some plastic tape on it to keep it out a small distance and turn the clicker until the chrome is sanded off to the brass underlay. I start with 220 grit and sand through 400 grit and then polish with 0000 steel wool. Be careful not to get the piece too hot as the plastic will melt. For the pen nib I took a plastic dowel I had and turned the end until it fit inside the threads and used a pointed live center to hold it in place while sanding the same way as described above. A 5/16 wood dowel can be used as well. The end of the dowel should be perfectly flat. For the .30-06 shell I remove the primer and mount it in the chuck and take the letter "O" size drill to drill through the end. To mount it for sanding I took a 5/16 bolt that was long enough to have a shoulder above the threads and cut the head off. I took a nut and ran it up to the shoulder and tightened it with a wrench so the shell wouldn't slide between the nut and bolt threads. Might want to do that before cutting the head off so it is there to hold onto. Now it is time to put the pen together and write all the love letters you been meaning to write to your significant other. I took one of the pens and made a stick pen and holder. I ran a drill bit through the bullet end of a shell to get the crimp section straight and turned the rib section as described above until it was a press fit into the shell. Put it together and found the ink cartridge was too short. I found a nail that was a tight fit into the cartridge after removing the plug and pushed it in until the right length was achieved. I DID NOT remove the primer for this one. And there you have it. No rocket science involved and a nice pen has evolved. I've already made over 80 of them. Everyone loves them. Enjoy
  11. Some of us have miter trimmer knives and sharpening the knives accurately can be a chore... I saw this iron sharpening jig elsewhere.. add drawer casters to it and adapt to hold the trimmer blades/irons and I believe you have solved an issue.. to add the caster.. ''wheel well'' for the caster wheels w/o the bracket and drift pin the wheels into place... twin keyhole/T slot the jig's face to make for adjustablity...
  12. This is my early Christmas and late birthday. Looks very solidly built.
  13. There some things on this one that I had to look closely. Very interesting
  14. I know there are 2 different type of bench grinders. High speed and low speed. Plus jigs to get the correct angles. Are you able to sharpen on a high speed bench grinder too?
  15. Collection of projects. Many free plans, some chargeable. Furniture, woodwork, and shop tools. Projects usually demonstrated on YouTube..
  16. That to thr GrandBRATS being here and wanting to go places.....work on the Cherry Box has ground to a halt...almost. Needed to give the brain a rest for a day or two, anyway.... Jig? Well, I needed a way to plough a groove into the frame's skinny and thin parts. Hard to hold onto them AND the Stanley #45......router table? Nah, I'd have to dig it out, set it up and listen to it scream....not. Laid down a scrap of pine. Two screws, countersunk to fix it in place on the bench. Some small brads to add a couple little piece to make a square corner. Used one of the frame's parts to make sure I had clearence along the outside edge... Something like this. The screw sticking up "in the way"? Well, it helps hold things in place... I think I can run a plane along the edge to dress it up a bit. All set up for the short ends. Then I can move the screw a bit, and set up for the longer sides. Should be able to run the 45 along the edge a few times. Not talking a lot of plane effort needed to plough these grooves, Maybe 3-4 swipes per piece. I have to double check to make sure I am grooving the TOP of each piece. When I get back to the shop, we'll see how this goes. Jig is a one time use thing. I will need to build a different one when I am working on the lid's panel. Might take as long to plough four grooves as it did to make the jig. Not that I'm cheap, or anything.....I intend to re-use the jig's parts for the panel work...
  17. Charles Nicholls

    plantpotjig

    From the album: Turning Jigs

    This here is the start of my idea to make a paper pot plant maker. Using a piece of apple for the base and a piece of maple for the cup. Thanks for the idea Lew.
  18. From the album: Lew's Basement Shop

    More overhead storage

    © Lewis Kauffman

  19. From the album: Lew's Basement Shop

    More overhead storage

    © Lewis Kauffman

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