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Found 33 results

  1. I had an ornament with a plain look and decided to try dye. The piece had been finished with lacquer . I applied Chestnut stains dye over the lacquer. This dye has shellac about 5% in it. After the dye was dried with heat gun I applied lacquer. Now for the question will this treatment lead to finish failure?
  2. I was working on a finishing presentation last week. I thought I had a reference in one of my books on decoding Minwax stains into pigment, dye, or both. I don't use them too much any more, but I happened to use some Golden Oak a few weeks ago. I've had good luck with it on red oak and I know it's dye based. But I could not find the reference. After much looking, I wrote to Minwax tech support and asked. They told me all they used were pigments. Idiot. I wrote to Bob Flexner to see if he had ever done the catalog. Low and behold, it's in this week's blog entry. I guess I'm his "woodworking friend." https://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/flexner-on-finishing-woodworking-blogs/is-there-pigment-or-dye-in-minwax-stains-does-it-matter
  3. Gerald

    Gift bowl w/flowers

    From the album: Hollow Forms

    Small hollow form with collar (cherry w/white oak and pecan w/padauk). Flowers turned from pecan and dyed w/ Chestnut Stains.
  4. Gerald

    Curly Maple Dyed Rim (blue-green)

    From the album: Bowls and Platters

    Curly maple done in the Clewes style with rim dyed with Chestnut Stains layered in blue sanded down, then yellow and green. Finish on front is lacquer gloss.
  5. Michael Thuman

    to Spray or brush

    Hi all I am finishing a pine door with a medium brown water based dye, then two coats of shellac then water based poly. My problem is the dye on hardwood always colors everything evenly. The Pine is not acting that way. It seems to have some issue. When dyed it is even and uniform. But by the time the first coat of shellac is put on with a brush or foam brush the dye is not uniform. Would I be better off spraying the shellac? If so the alchol is quite flamable and I need to turn off the water tank and furnance. When I get home I will upload some pictures. My very kind spouse says she likes the variation. This is my first endevour with a closed cell softwood.
  6. Gerald

    Pecan dyed and gilt

    Here is one on the lathe today . Pecan turned with undercut , then dyed Chesney Stains Royal Blue , then applied gold golf cream.
  7. Gerald

    Curly maple platter

    Clewes did not make it so we had our own turning two weeks ago. Finically got thru with the finish work. Dyed with yellow and royal blue in Chestnut stains alcohol base. Back is shellac sealed and then Watco. Rubbed out with Mcguiar's rubbing cod and polishing cod. Then Renaissance wax.
  8. Gerald

    BOC in blue

    From the album: Hollow Forms

    Beads of Courage bowl dyed with Chestnut Stains with overlay of colors (royal blue, red, yellow) on pecan turning.
  9. Gerald

    Flower

    Been wanting to do tulips for a while but instead of cutting the notch ahead wanted to turn thin and carve them. You could say this is a prototype as I plan to mak some changes such as smaller petals. The dye does not do well in pecan. But it is passable.
  10. Gerald

    BOC in red

    From the album: Hollow Forms

    Beads of Courage bowl dyed with Chestnut Stains (red, yellow and touch of green) on pecan bowl
  11. Gerald

    Yellow Popcorn

    From the album: Hollow Forms

    Popcorn (Chinese tallow) vase dyed yellow with Chestnut Stains
  12. Gerald

    Multi Color vase

    From the album: Hollow Forms

    Large vase of Popcorn tree dyed with Chestnut Stains using airbrush.
  13. Gerald

    Beads of Courage

    Finally got a chance to do a photo secession yesterday. This gives me a chance to talk about the Beads of Courage program.This is a link to the artists page for woodturners. Go under the programs tab to read about Beads of Courage. Basically the program give beads to children with critical diseases such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, blood diseases, cardiac diseases and chronic illnesses. The beads are given for each event such as transfusions, treatments, special exams and a long list. Beads are specific for each event group and some are hand blown glass. Last year our club started providing bowls to hold beads to a local childrens hospital which used the BOC program for CF. These bowls can be made from a glue up of dry wood or turned from a green blank which take longer to finish and may explain why we have not had more of these made . Last year we had 7 and this year so far 6. I think I may have done 8 of the total. Oh by the way the program sells BOC beads to place into the bowl and the bead come with a card to place in the bowl with turner info and wood info. The first pic is cherry and the second is chinese tallow (popcorn tree).
  14. Steve Krumanaker

    A few more ornaments

    Segmented plywood this time. Haven't done any of these for a couple years as I couldn't find decent plywood. The last piece I got from Menards had so many voids I threw most of my blanks away. I had a free shipping code from Rockler and bought a 3/4" piece of baltic birch. It was very nice to work with and basically had no waste. Steve
  15. John Morris

    English China Plate Cabinet

    From the album: Old English Plate Shelf

    Finished and ready for delivery. My go to finishing schedule for most of my flat work is water based dyes for color, followed by a coat of boiled linseed oil, then oil based varnish. I still love the warmth and glow of oil based varnishes, it has a warmth that I love.

    © Courtland Woodworks

  16. Gerald

    Dyed bowl

    Have had this piece on my bench for a while. It is spaulted Chinese tallow . I just got another air brush from HF with finer control. It was perfect for this. Used Chestnut Stains in red, royal blue and yellow. In this pic finish is nog quite done.
  17. Gerald

    RedMagnolia.JPG

    From the album: Hollow Forms

    This Spalted Magnolia hollow form is turned from wood from the old Federal Courthouse in Jackson,MS. The tree was cut down by a subcontractor who was not supposed to do that. I asked my DIL what her favorite color was and got pink as the answer. So I did a light red, then use acrylic paint on the rim for a "crowning " touch.
  18. I got a little shop time yesterday! So I thought I'd make a little something for our daughter's violin teacher, she has taken it upon herself to give our daughter lessons pro bono, but we could not have that so I told every now and then I'd get something out of the shop for her. We are starting small at first so I can get an idea of her tastes, once I know what she likes in her home (mountain cabin with cedar walls) then we'll get more extravagant. I decided on a simple little shaker style wall shelf with sliding dovetails. Of course every project starts out with a plank of wood! Then with a couple simple layout tools we can commence to just having some fun and layout some lines. It takes me a few tries before I get something that looks pleasing. It is purely a personal thing, and even after I do the layout and it all looks good on wood, I really don't know what I will think about it until I get it cut out and set it up to see how the proportions look. The idea here is to just have fun with it. After about a dozen tries I finally came out with some lines I enjoy. This photo is the bottom of the wall shelf. You can click on this one to view it larger to see the line. This next photo is the top of the shelf, I loved how this one turned out, I tried some tighter radius's and a thinner top portion, but then I went bold and just used my string bow for the radius. Click on photo for larger image. I cut the first half out on the band saw, I only like cutting up to the line about a 1/6th proud, I am horrible at following a line on the line, if I try to cut to the line I typically cut over it and blow the layout, I am one of those unfortunates that do not have a good eye and steady feed to be able to cut right to the line so I leave the line in place, and spindle sand or plane to the line. Below you'll see the first half is finished, and it is laid up over the second half to mark out. I am pleased with the appearance of the layout after it has been cut out. I have a Porter Cable 4210 Dovetail Jig that is really handy for these smaller jobs. I like to use the sliding dovetail feature instead of dadoing the shelves in. I like the way the sliding dovetail lends that extra level of assurance that the shelves will not separate from the sides of case work like this. Think about it, an interlocking shelf that with all your might you could not pull apart even before it is glued up, then you add glue, and it would take a herculean effort to pull the sides away from the shelf, I like to make projects to last lifetimes, to hand down to generations. I know this is just a simple shelf, but 150 years from now, it will still be in one piece bar any disaster such as fire or landfill. You could drop this from 10 feet up and it will not separate. I like to think that anything I do will age and gain a rich patina, and the marks of wear from a century of knick knacks along with salt and pepper shakers that will have inhabited the shelf. I like to do my runs in sets, to assure that the two Dovetail slots will line up perfectly. So I clamp my halves together and then I insert the halves in the jig. These halves will stay clamped together for the duration of the slotting operations. You want to be sure you position the clamp in a manner that you do not have to pull it off to make room for the next operation. If you do have to pull it off, you'll need to use a second clamp to secure the boards before you pull off the first clamp. Click on image to enlarge. Just another shot of the two boards in position, the dovetail slot is the longer narrow area in the middle of the template. Now the Porter Cable 4210 Dovetail Jighas a handy little feature just like the bigger jigs do, a router bit depth stop. The depth stop is marked out accordingly, 1/4" for routing dovetail slots in 1/2" lumber, 3/8" for routing slots in 3/4" lumber, and 1/2" for routing slots in 1" lumber. I forgot to say, the PC 4210 comes with bushings and a dovetail bit that are suited for this jig. In this case I set my router bit depth to 3/8", I planed my lumber for the sides to 5/8" to give the shelf some depth and difference in the parts, and I wanted the slot to be routed as deep as possible without compromising the integrity of the sides. Click image to enlarge. With the halves in place and the boards set to the line in the jig ,and the bit depth set, the operation was completed, I am sorry I did not get any pictures of the actual operation, but it would have been difficult to hold the camera in one hand and the router in the other! TIP:When you route the slot, come in from both sides as to prevent tear out. Start from one side, cut the slot length about 90 percent, back your router back down the slot to exit, then come in from the opposite side, this will prevent unsightly blow out of the edges. One slot cut one to go. As you can see the two halves are still clamped up! You want to keep them clamped up until your finished with the slot cutting operations. Now the two halves are rotated 180 degrees (on this piece because of the location of the slots, yours will differ) with some operations you can keep feeding the work in one direction until you run out of room or support, but with this small shelf, it had to be rotated. The opposite end is now in the jig, and just for assurance, even though I drew my lines out accurately, I check the board for squareness in relation to the jig. And the second slot is cut just as the first one was. TIP: Do any sanding of the surface of the slotted boards before you slot them! If you sand them after you slot them, you'll ruin the reference to the dovetailed boards, and you'll create an unsightly gap between the ends of the shelves and the surface of the slotted board. Now with my slots cut and clamp removed I set the two halves out of the way and I get set for the routing operation of the shelf ends for the dovetail style profile. I start off with a piece of scrap the exact same thickness as the shelves. TIP: If your going to thickness plane the shelves, make sure you plane a piece of scrap at the same time to use for a test run in this procedure. In my case, I did not plane the shelves, so I was able to use a cutoff from the band saw operation. This portion of the entire operation is the only time you'll need to make some minor adjustments. The routing of the slots is straight forward, it is what it is, set the depth of the bit, line em up and cut. Routing the ends of the shelves is where all adjustments are made. Set the scrap piece in the jig up to the template, keeping your router bit at the same depth throughout the entire procedure, make your first test cut. Remove your test piece and see how it fits! As you can see my first test run turned out a sloppy fitting joint. Click image to enlarge. To adjust this slop out, you'll need to adjust the black knob, then the brass knob, it only takes a slight twist clockwise of both knobs on each side of the jig to take up the slop, what this does is cut less of the material away by putting more of the lumber under the aluminum jig. You'll have to flip your test piece over or cut off the one end to make a new cut. Since I have slop, there is no re-using the same cut end. If it were too tight, I could turn the knobs counter clockwise, bring the board out from under the template thus cutting more away. Sorry for the poor picture quality on this one, but you can see the adjusting knobs. Ahhhh, perfect fit now!!! You don't want the fit to be snug, you want to be able to slide the piece with some resistance, but not a whole lot, you'll need some room for the glue, and if your doing a multiple shelf glue up you'll be thankful you gave yourself some room, if you don't leave the room, your glue can freeze up the joint before you get it all in place. Now we are ready for the actual shelf to be cut, the shelf is in place. And the first cut is performed. Click on image to enlarge. Once you get it all set up, the rest goes quickly, I routed the ends of my two shelves in 3 minutes. So, with the shelves now routed, the sides are slotted, we are getting ready for glue up. The rest is academic, we all know how to spread glue and insert board "A" into board "B". The only thing I would recommend here is to do a dry fit first, sometimes the boards might fit a little too snug, in which case all I do is wrap some 220 sandpaper around a paint stirrer sized stick and sand the insides of the slots to allow a little more room for the board to slide in. Use plenty of glue, to allow for lubrication while sliding the joints in place. The natural instinct is to use too little,we think that just because it is an interlocking joint that a lil dab will so ya. That may be so, but that lil dab will do ya philosophy will get you in trouble as you slide the joints in place and it freezes up on you half way through. Once the boards are in place, clamp it all up! This project up to this point took me about 2 hrs to complete, it is a simple project, fun to wind down with and you are able to freestyle it. No plans, just your eye. If I would change anything about this one, I would rip the board down to 4" instead of 6" for proportional sake only. Nevertheless I think she'll be happy with the small shelf for the wall of her mountain cabin. The dimensions are 28" tall by 18" wide and 6" deep. Though the routing setup and operation seemed like it took awhile in the tutorial, it actually only took about a half hr for setup, test cut, and final cutting. Once you get to know the jig just like with any jig, it all goes fast. Today I will sand it out to 180, apply some TransFast Early American Maple Dye and we'll talk about the rest of the finishing process in the next post! Thanks all for reading!
  19. Gerald

    Aspen bowl w/dye ring

    From the album: Bowls and Platters

    Aspen bowl required more than usual sanding. The dye ring applied with a brush
  20. Gerald

    Aspen with dye

    From the album: Bowls and Platters

    aspen bowl was my first of this wood. Requires a bit of sanding. The dye was splattered from a brush.
  21. Gerald

    Inside Out PIP

    This is about some inside out ornaments I did a few years ago. The initial glue up is simple with 4 perfectly square strips only glued at the ends with hot glue or taped (a risky procedure) because you will need to get these apart without damage. This is the reglue (TB II) after the first turning. You must be very careful to align the cut out so that it will be even. This best way to drill the ends for finial and hanger cap. This is how to drill if you forget till after turning or is hole is wrong. Mount of the reglued blank Turned round and marked for turning. Note that the inside was colored before turning round so any dye spill will be turned off at this stage. Turned to shape and ready for dye. Dyed these on the Lathe so could hold brush and get even line. Finial and hanger are turned seperately and glued into predrilled holes. And these are some of the finished ornaments. I think I made 26 that year.
  22. Gerald

    Ornaments

    Finished these up this week for the church widows banquet. There are 60 there yes count them. Dyed with Chestnut Spirit stain and ends painted with acrylic craft paint. Finish is lacquer.
  23. Gerald

    Red Magnolia

    This Spalted Magnolia hollow form is turned from wood from the old Federal Courthouse in Jackson,MS. The tree was cut down by a subcontractor who was not supposed to do that. I asked my DIL what her favorite color was and got pink as the answer. So I did a light red, then use acrylic paint on the rim for a "crowning " touch.Then we went to visit and I left this in a bag at home. Oh the inside is painted with Black Gesso since spalting was bad enough I could not get a good finish inside so with the black no reflection and difficult to see bottom.
  24. John Morris

    English China Plate Cabinet

    From the album: Old English Plate Shelf

    Young Patriot Woodworkers, they are not ready to see this one leave our shop. As with any project that takes time, it becomes part of the family, and the kids always hate to see it leave the shop.

    © Courtland Woodworks

  25. Ron Dudelston

    Epoxy as a Filler

    As many of you may know, I have pretty much sworn off stain and like to use dye instead. The down side of dye is that wood fillers don't take dyes well so you really have to make sure you have tight joints. Late last week I was building a couple of flag cases (one cherry and one poplar) and I had a 45 degree miter that wasn't as tight as I liked so I've fretted and stewed all weekend about how to filler the slight crack. After some experimentation, I finally mixed a little dry aniline dye granules with some 2 part epoxy. The epoxy took the dye well. I sanded the case to 240 grit and misted it with water to raise the grain and then hit it with 400. Then I mixed the epoxy and filled the crack. After a couple of hours, I resanded it with 400, re-wet the case and put 2 coats of W.D. Lockwood dye on it. I liked the way it filled and it is invisible. I'm now a believer. Before After

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