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Found 11 results

  1. I purchased a Harbor Freight dust collector and intend to upgrade the impeller. I am having a serious issue getting the stock impeller off. I have never done this before and do not want to mess up the impeller (incase I need it for later) or the shaft. I purchased a set of gear pullers and still cold not get it to come off. Any suggestions.
  2. Thought it might be best to start off with what my current setup is or at least parts of it. My Dust collector is a Grizzly 1029 2 hp operating on 220v. It had a 5 micron bag top and bottom when purchased and was upgraded to a canister filter from Penn State. My collector is located in the attic of my shop in a insulated enclosure and a 12x24 filtered return to the shop. Power is controlled with a Long RAnger remote. Ducting I used is 4 inch thinwall PVC. We will get into ducting and turning corners later. I have limited amounts of Flex hose in 4 and 6 inch. My bblast gates are a combination of homemade and manufactured plastic gates of two types. Since the Dc is located in the center of the shop ducting goes out in a spider like orientation. Ducting to machines is split in several places by use of wyes and boxes (made from Shop Notes plans). I have a cyclone based on some plan I found somewhere and a control box on it based on Shop Notes plans expanded. I recently added a Dust Deputy cyclone and may do away with the wooden cyclone. DC Room under construction on the left. Chip collection box and ducts to DC in attic on right. Another view of lower ducts and chip box. Above is Dust deputy with connections turned on the lathe to adapt openings to 6 inch flex hose. Ducts attached to ceiling spread to machines from this point. Of note here it is best to keep Duct runs as short as possible and as straight as you can get them. Any turn should be gradual and not an immediate 90 degree. This can be done with purchased wide and ducts or put two 45 angles together with a short 4-6 inch piece of duct between them. More on this in the next entry about choosing and installing ducts and blast gates .
  3. Gentleman, this is what happens to impeller blades on a 3 phase, 4 bag dust collector when it sucks up a 6 inch scrap and binds up
  4. Now this may be getting the cart before the horse but lets call it collecting supplies you will need to connect your DC to machines. Thin wall PVC will work just fine . For the best you can order metal ducts any size you want but you will also have to buy expensive connections . A consideration many people talk about is grounding the dust collector and duct. To my knowledge and every forum I have been on and every article and book "there has never been a explosion in a home workshop due to dust collector" . Now , yes a dust collector will create static electricity which causes dust to adhere to outside of ducts. If you do want to ground you can use bare copper wire wrapped around the outside of the pipe and ground to machine and the DC. Using thin wall PVC is easier to work with and connectors are readily available. When you put all these together you can use PVC cement but I guarantee you will rearrange the system and your shop so go with something reversible such as caulk. You can also use screws to hold the connections together but use as short a screw as will do the job to limit disruption inside duct. You do not have to seal these joints inside as you can do that on the outside of the pipe . This is not to keep the pipe together but to seal leaks. Every little air leak reduces the air flow you will get from your system and that includes all connections. When using PVC try to keep the long runs as one solid piece of pipe, and after that the fewer joints the better. When I use 45 elbows to create a 90 I grind off that little shelf inside the fitting. Reason: you want the walls as smooth as possible because any bumps or restriction cause disruptions in airflow and reduce suction. This is why you want to reduce the use of flex hose to a minimum. Dust collectors work on a volume of air not the suction power. Dust is suspended in the air flow and disruptions can cause it to drop out and start a clog. Now as to the size of duct " the bigger the better" is not a rule but it is better close to the DC to have larger and go to smaller closer to the machine. My Dc only starts at 5 inch so the 6 I used is overkill but not a killer as it is only 8 foot. Dust collectors do not work well on shop vac hose but that can work for small areas such as drill press or small sanders. Planners, bandsaws, tablesaws, and other large machines are bet to use 4 inch or larger connections. Hanging the duct in the ceiling is simple and easy with several methods. Large plastic twist ties work well. Perforated metal strap will also do the job . I have made several of mine from galvanized wire. Or you can make nice hangers from wood. I started out with what I would call a traditional blast gate made of plastic with short tapers on each end to connect flex. Note that 4 inch PVC connectors do fit 4 inch flex but take a piece with you when you buy. You can buy wire clamps made to seal the flex to connectors or buy a kit at Harbor Freight to make your own hose clamps. Recently I found a new blast gate with a spiral on one end and a shape on the other end which will fit PVC. There are many many designs of blast gate out there from plastic to metal and even some that automatically open when you turn on the machine. When you install the blast gate you will want in convenient and as close to the machine as you can get it. When you do branches off the main gates are a good way to shift the air down different runs. I have one at the top of a run and when open air goes to CMS and wide belt sander (each also with a gate) on the other side the gates at the lathes need to be closed. More pictures next time and how to make your own gates ,
  5. My shop is a small,15x15 area. No windows. I did clean up, a lot, before the photos. Don’t know what else to say...it’s small.
  6. From summer to winter in 3 days. You gotta love Pennsylvania weather! There's still time to get your ornaments into Easy Wood Tools and @Jim from Easy Wood Tools! If you are making some basic ones that will need finished, they have volunteers waiting! Check out @John Morris's post for more details and where to send them- Our Patriot Turners- Speaking of ornament, or turners have been busy! @Ron Altier sent our friends at Easy Wood Tools these beauties- There was a bit of confusion as to the identity of the maker but it all got straightened out in the end- Ron also showed us a new type of design that did not require any turning- Check out his post in the General Woodworking forum- Last week Ron posted a thread on his "Inside-Out" ornament. Several of our turners added to the discussion by showing us some of their work and procedures. Here is the post again so you can catch up- Ornaments weren't the only thing happening here this week! @JohnM got himself a mighty fine new (used) lathe. He received lot's of comments about his purchase- John was not the only one getting new stuff. @RustyFN got a great deal on a new chuck and a bunch of jaws! @Cliff put his metal working lathe to work and redesigned his wood lathe dust collector system. Check out his post for additional information and the discussion from our members- @Steve Krumanaker turned one of the most beautiful maple bowls you will ever see. The grain in the wood is stunning. More images and our members compliments are here- @Ron Altier asked if any of our turners had ever worked with one of these pen kits- The discussion that followed ventured into the area of pressure pots and stabilization- @Gene Howe posted a link to a shop made jig for sharpening gouges. It is similar to the Wolverine jig. Here is the link, however, you'll have to copy and then paste it into your browser. Our site software won't paste it directly as a link- http://lumberjocks.com/projects/397921 What’s Coming Up- Virginia Woodturning Symposium Sponsored by the Virginia Woodturners, Inc. November 3 & 4, 2018, Expoland - Fishersville, VA http://www.virginiawoodturners.com/?utm_source=Regional+Event+Virginia+10+12++2018+&utm_campaign=regional&utm_medium=email For The Newbies- I really appreciate @Gerald's suggestion for items in this new area. One f the first techniques for a new turner is making a spindle. Mastering this type of turning leads to all kinds of interesting projects- rolling pins, candle holders, salt/pepper devices, etc. Here is a 3 part video showing the various stages of creating a spindle that eventually becomes a spinning top- Of course there are many, many sources for learning to turn. Hands on instruction can't be beat. If there is a turning club in your area or a Woodcraft store, check them out! Expand Your Horizons- Last week I posted a video from the WyomingWoodturner on bowl embellishment. Here is one more from Sam Angelo showing the process in more detail- New Turning Items- Although I've never made one, canes are a popular item. If you are thinking about this as a project, you may find this item useful- More about this at there site- https://www.treelineusa.com/e-z-cane-handle-fastening-system.html Safe turning
  7. Today is both a sad and glad day for me. As my wife and are working quickly for our move to Bowling Green, Kentucky from Corona, California, today I sold my Jet Contractor Saw with 52"extension with full extension drawers and my Delta 1.5hp Dust Collector. The photo below shows the empty space where the saw and dust collector lived. I bought my Jet saw about 1998 and it got a great amount of use over these 20 years. I bought my Delta dust collector about 2005 and used it for 13 years. As we are limited with U-Haul space I had to sell them as we can't take them with us. I posted it online with a price of $100 for the saw and $100 for the dust collector. Yes, those are very low prices, but I have very little time before we head to Kentucky. My wife posted them on the Facebook Marketplace for selling items. It only took 1 minute once I hit the "Send" button to get a response from a guy who was the first one to message me. He lived a few miles away and builds cabinets out of his garage. It took him all of 10 minutes for him to pull up in front of my house with a trailer. He was a really nice guy and I was happy that he was happy about getting a killer deal. But he was very skeptical wondering if there was a big catch to this deal. Once I told him our limited time frame and then fired up both the saw and the dust collector, he reached into his pocket and gave me two "Benjamin's". I am sure that he was looking in his mirrors to see if this was a set up and maybe the Cops would be after him. This was a big weight off of my mind as we still have a lot to do before leaving California. Our house is almost empty of furniture and the dog keeps walking around trying to figure out what is going on. He is very mopey and has to be near Tami and I as he is afraid that he may be gone too. So this is one less thing that I have to worry about as we get everything packed up.
  8. The more you cut, the more chips and dust you generate. When a router is used, there is often a fan in the router that blows down while it is cutting. That breeze will blow chips away from the cut with enough force to keep them from being sucked up by a brush perimeter shop vac collector in place. I honestly haven't found a way to get "perfect" collection of the debris generated while the CNC is cutting. If I know I'll have to suck/sweep some up after a cut, then it is less damage to my ears to NOT use a shop vac and simply let the chips fly. The "other" thing most jobs produce is very fine dust that wafts through the air and will end up on everything in the shop. To keep this out of my lungs I mount a filtered air cleaner right above the CNC beds in our furniture design shop. When the wood being cut is making more dust than chips I also wear a dust mask. 4D
  9. Hi all I am looking a purchasing a c-flux 2.0 HP machine from Laguna Tools and I mentioned I got their link from this site so I want to know is the cflux a good machine?
  10. We had our monthly woodworkers meeting at WoodCraft last night and parked inside by the front door was their new Harvey Dust Collector. https://www.woodcraft.com/products/harvey-g700-gyroair-dust-processor Also they had a new Harvey Lathe. https://www.woodcraft.com/products/harvey-t40-turbo-bench-lathe Herb
  11. I have a Delta 1 1/2 HP dust collector in my shop that for the most part does a good job. I have 4" PVC pipe run to all of my machines and usually only have one gate open at a time. However there are times when I have help in the shop and we are using multiple machines and just don't get enough air flow to pull on the machines. My Delta table saw is the worse of the bunch. I have the overhead guard/dust collector and pulling off the bottom but it just doesn't get the enough pull. I am thinking of going to a 3 hp to get the higher CFM's and to allow multiple machines to run at the same time. I have been reading a few reviews but no real good comparisons. I really like the looks of the Laguna, but the few reviews I have read were not good, talking about leaks and missing parts and trouble getting replacement parts. Have any of you seen a recent comparison by any of the Wood Working Magazines lately? I would really be interested in what they have to say.
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