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Found 46 results

  1. My wife has /does collect artwork and she is always in need of storage chests. I decided that my next chest would have 12 raised panels, be painted, and made to her specifications(to fit some artwork). I selected poplar wood because it works/planes well and I have a few 100 board feet of it. The construction was a combination of power tools and a finished surface with hand planing of all of the surfaces. The chest is made of solid wood.... nothing plywood. Mortise and tenons were used to join the frame members and then pinned together. A half mortise lock secures the contents. The photos show the parts of the construction from beginning to end.
  2. Just to put what I had so far on the Cherry Blanket chest in one post. The Picture below is the sytle I am building this chest like. The sides and ends of this chest will have the boards vertical instead of horizontal. In order to keep them as flat as possible and not have so much sanding to to at the end I have been putting them together in sections. First I laid them out on the table after they were cut and run across the jointer and and through the planer to get close to finish size. This let me look at the grain and try to match it so it looks like a seamless piece as much as possible. Then I biscuit jointed each of the sections. I put two boards together at a time, but first I ran them through the table saw with the glue edge blade to get a good square edge. The photo above shows the gaps before run through the table saw. Now they are glued into to two board sections. Then the two board sections were flattened in the planer and then two of the two board sections were glued. So now I only had to smooth out this joint but from here on it is done with the belt sander since they are too wide to run through the planer. There are nine pieces to make up the sides panels so I had to glue three in one of the sections. So then I put the sections together to check and see before the final two pieces got put together. So it was cut biscuit joints here and put them into the 50" Bessey Clamps. And let me just tell you I really like the Bessey Clamps for gluing these type of panels. They are expensive, but do a great job. So both the front and back panels glued and standing on my work bench in the 50" clamps. And here they are with the two end pieces standing in front of them. So I will start working on the skirt for the bottom and the trim around the top and I got in my stain samples so I will take some extra boards I cut out and get me color matches done. This has taken a good bit more time putting these panels together but I am liking the end results. Well I will post some more on it later. Let me know what you think.
  3. Got to start somewhere. Breaking down a couple of 4/4 x6 x8' Walnut planks. Cut a few down to match the raised panels I made a while back. Cleaned up the rough sawn edges a bit, and marked them for a rip cut. After a rip down the middle, these will go on the ends, to house them raised panels. Going to get these to a somewhat finished sized, and then smooth the faces up. Less to plane, that way. Tried to handsaw these boards down, ran out of breath ( COPD??) so an OLD Sears Craftsman Circular saw was used. It will also do all the rip cuts. Corner posts were straight edged up. Then set up for a rip down the middle. I'll then add a Tongue & groove joint to the edges of the corner posts.
  4. IF I can get this camera-ooski to upload a few photos, looks like it might work. Seems I have a duplicate shot. Just a Walnut & Pine Tool Box. Filling up fast, too
  5. Hi Everyone I was asked to create a special keepsake chest for a couple in memory of their first child. The chest is made from Peruvian Walnut and measures 28 x 16 x 10. The Memorial Plaque is made from Holly and laser engraved. Although I had to learn a few new techniques in the construction of this project I can’t say this was a fun project.
  6. Install a lid. and a seal coat. Found some water a-going across the Dungeon floor today. Figured I get the lid on, and then seal the wood up. First the hinges a bit of chisel work with just a few hand tools. Scratch awl is a Stanley. Used it to make some pilot holes, then ran a screw into each. After start to get things together....found the hinges were on up-side down....ooops. Re-install the hinge, right side up. Brass screws that came with the hinges were a bit too long. Grinder made them the right length. Lid also has a pine cleat on one end, to keep a crack in place. Used the un-cut end of the cleat as a hand-hold, while screwing down the hinges There were a bunch of counter-bored screws on the case and lid. Went out and got some store bought plugs. The seven on the edge of the lid were easy, lid was standing up, just add some glue, and a plug. Tap down until flush with the end of the mallet. The sides, however were different. Needed an old block of wood, drop a big blob of glue on it, moosh the plug around a bit, and install with the mallet head made a mess of the mallet. the plugs were then planed down a bit this was a before a block plane leveled them down. Well, that is about all for wood working..... oh yeah, a seal coat? remember, this is just the first/seal coat. Raised panels on the ends are Sycamore. Another view? and maybe a look at the lid? there is a big, fancy word for that strange shine, begins with, Chato.....?
  7. While the sliding tray is .....Ok, I wanted a second one that I could carry to the work site. Needed to have a tote. One with a handle in the middle. Picked up an UGLY plank of 1x10 pine Handsome, ain't he? Figured i could get at least a few pieces out of it. Measured the space for the tote. 25" long, and abot 6-1/2" wide was available, thanks to a backsaw's tote sticking up. Picked out one area for the bottom slab, and two more for piece work. At 6-1/2" wide I neede to slim down the 9-1/2" wide plank for a bottom of the tray. Had an old jig, measure where the blade on the circular saw wound up at, and the outside edge of the sole. Clamped the jig in place to rip off the excess wood Just have to keep the saw's sole against the jig, cuts nice and straight. Grabbed a Wards #78 and made a few rebates ( rabbets to you southern folks) This one is on the end of the bottom piece. needed to go around all four edges on it. Ripped two more boards @ 25" long, by 3-1/2" wide. These were to be the sides. Had a third one ripped a bit wider, for the handle. The first two got a rebate on each end. Counter-bored some holes with a thumbnail-killing 3/8" Forstner bit ( got the nail, but no blood) and installed the sides. Measured two 1x4 pine pieces for the ends. Cut to length, and then laid out a stopped dado. Had to make sure the other was a mirror image of the first. Dados will house the handle piece. Sawed the waste a bit, then chopped the rest out with a couple chisels. One was done, and installed. Needed to find out the height I needed for the ends of the handle. And the final length. Cut to length, then laid out a handle. Finger hole area was done with a 1-3/8" forstner bit, overlapping the hole. Sabresaw cut the rest of the handle out, and then a 3/8" round-over bit in the router to smooth thing up Yeah, yeah, got a bit of an over-cut. Take a good long look, this is about the last time this tote will ever be empty. Handle is just housed, no glue or screws hold it in place. Just the two dados. And now, this is what happens when something empty is placed into the Tool Chest Two full trays. the tote can be lifted right out, to access the tools underneath. And, wonder of wonders The lid will even close! igor needs to use the broom for something besides flying around. Used a few planes to clean up the boards A Jack plane at work. Ohio Tool Co. ( of Auburn NY) #05c and another smaller plane A WWII era Wards Master #3, cleaning up after the Jack plane. As for that second coat of varnish This is while I was rubbing things out. Took two people to get this onto the floor. Needed the bench to work on a few things, I could have got it down, but I wanted it in one piece....Weighs as much as I do
  8. Maple and walnut. 24" tall 15" wide and 7" deep. All joints are M&T. Sanded to 180, 3 coats of matte poly, each roughed with a white mesh pad and final finish rubbed out with Liberon #0000 SW and paste wax. Drawers are lined with the same purple felt as the wings. Wrapped cereal box card board and dropped it in and glued them. Top drawer is fitted with ring holders. A piece of 3/8 thick dense foam with knife silts. The felt was laid over the top and slid into the slits with a steel ruler. The dot is a 3/8 rare earth magnet that catches the metal piece robbed from a push-to-open magnetic catch. The wings for studs and pins are felt covered M&T frames. Four per side. They swivel on 1/8" by 1/2" brass pins. Wife and I had to align all 8 to holes in the top at the same time and, then fit the top on the tenons cut in the sides and the dado for the back. Took us well over an hour. The top is screwed on and the screws counter bores are covered with walnut pegs from Rockler. Not shown are six 1" long brass pegs across the inside top, behind the wings, for necklaces. This was one major PITA for me. But, I learned a number of new techniques, learned some new combinations of cuss words, built a few jigs and best of all, bought a couple new planes needed to complete it. I'm sure the next three will be easier.(Fingers crossed!!!!)
  9. Well for several weeks I have posted some pictures of this chest and I am happy to report to you that it is finished. Just a recap. Started with a visit to the Wood Stash and hand picked some of the best looking Cherry Boards from the stack. Cut them to size, ran them across the jointer and then through the planner. I then took the cherry boards and edge glued them together to make the panels for the front, back and both ends of the chest. Then I put two of these panels together to make a four board panel. Then I put the two four board panels together to make one large panel. Actually one of the panels had five boards.. Using my 50" Bessey clamps to hold the two panels together. So I had two long panels for the front and back and two short panels for the ends. Then I started working on a sample for the trim or molding to go around the top and bottom. After a few adjustments to the bits, I settled on the way I wanted to make the trim and started routing the pieces. First a couple of passes with the curved bit in the router and the with the round top bit and then a 1/2" round over bit. So I sanded the trim and then started on the feet for the chest. They are double boards so the chest actually sits on one board and the trim sits on the other board. There are blocks behind the feet to attach them to the plywood bottom. So everything is now trimmed up, miters cut and ready to put together. Now it is time to move it to the spray booth and put the water based dye on. I purchased an Antique Cherry dye and I really love the look it gave the chest. I sprayed it on and then took a damp paper towel and smoothed out the finish. If you get a bit much in a spot it is okay, you still have time to smooth it out. I put two coats on and then sprayed on five coats of General Finishes Enduro Var. It was them rubbed out with 0000 steel wool and Johnson's paste wax.. So there you have the Cherry Blanket Chest from start to finish.
  10. Well, I was going to post this last night after we got to our son and daughter in law's new house that they just moved into, but I had to help my son put together the new sofa/bed that Tami and I were going to sleep on. We got done after midnight so I figured that it would have to wait until this morning. In Part 2 of this project of making a Cedar Lined Walnut Blanket Chest for Nori, my first grand daughter that will be born this coming November, John Moody, Ron Dudelston and I were all at John Moody's house to hang out for a few days and we were building this chest together in John Moody's shop. In the first post on this project we got all the lumber milled down and got the panels glued up. So in this post we got all the panels sanded down and cut to final dimensions, cut and dry fit the dovetail joints, cut and fit the plywood bottom, glued up the chest, rough sanded the chest, routed the top, attached the top, and milled the cedar boards that will line the inside of the chest. It took a lot more sanding than we planned on the panels as we got some bowing in the glue ups which cost us extra time over our short weekend together. But we finally got everything down to the right thicknesses and got the dovetails cut. Here are John and Ron as we were working on the dry fit. Those dovetails turned out great! John has the Dovetail Jig from Peachtree Woodworking and it was really easy to do. After getting the birch plywood bottom notched and fitted into the dadoes and making sure that it wall perfectly square, it was time to get it glued up. Taping the inside corners with the Blue Painter's Tape sure was a time/work saver to deal with the squeeze out during the clamping. I can't tell you how many times John told Ron and I during this build "Don't ask me how I know this, but we need to do/not do ___________ or it will mess up the chest." Since he has made quite a few blanket chests his experience and wisdom was great to have. After letting the glue dry overnight, we got up early on Monday morning to get as much done as possible before Ron and I had to head back up north to Indiana. Ron got all the dovetail joints sanded down flush and they all look great! After getting the rough sanding done, we did the measurements and cut and routed the decorative edge on the top and then mounted the top using 3 of the Rockler chest hinges. We had hoped to get more of the chest done, but ran out of time to get the bottom trim and lining the inside with the cedar and do the final sanding. So Ron will do the final sanding and I will head up there later this week and we finish the trim and cedar lining at in his shop. After that I will be taking it to my kid's house and putting a few coats of a wipe on oil/varnish finish before Tami and I head back home to California. I had a great time working with John and Ron on this project. We were all worn out as it was a lot of work to get done over a weekend, but it turned out great. Before we blew off all the dust and carried it out to Ron's van, the last thing was to get John and Ron's signatures on the bottom in permanent ink so Nori will know how much love was put into this chest. Once I get the final finish on I will post some more photos. Here is photo of all of us at the Moody's before Ron, Dorothy, Tami and I headed back to Indiana.
  11. I got the Cherry Blanket Chest shipped out last week and I have been worried about it getting damaged in shipping. Today I received an email from the person I was working with and she told me it arrived in perfect condition. She sent me a picture of the chest in it's new home. I am so excited that it made it and it looks like I got the stain about right for the Sleigh Bed it is sitting at the foot of. Now I can breath a little. Shipped it on Old Dominion and they did an excellent job getting it there.
  12. Version 1.0.0

    4 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use.
  13. View File Workbench Magazine July-August 1966 Childs Chest This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. Submitter John Morris Submitted 10/14/2017 Category Furnishings  
  14. From the album: 18th Century Connecticut Blanket Chest

    I absolutely loved making these chests, I made a few of them then stopped, I was combing through my archives and found images of this chest, we still have this chest in our home today.
  15. Just got the blanket chest off of the bench Friday. Now going to wait until the weather gets warmer to take back out in the shop and stain and varnish. Took the 6" carsiding and put in a extra groove from the router to make it look like 3" . The 6" looks good on the bed for as big as it is but the 3" looks better for the chest for as small as it is.
  16. View File Workbench Magazine Mar-Apr 1966 Early American Blanket Chest This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. A personal note from me, I love this design, this is quintessential Early American true to it's design and practical use. This chest will make a wonderful project, and and wonderful hand tool project as well! Submitter John Morris Submitted 10/30/2016 Category Furnishings  
  17. Version 1.0.0

    9 downloads

    This is a scanned document of the now defunct Workbench Magazine of this era. Permission was granted by the new Workbench Publication for The Patriot Woodworker community to copy and use the old Workbench Magazine at our pleasure, and for free distribution and re-use. A personal note from me, I love this design, this is quintessential Early American true to it's design and practical use. This chest will make a wonderful project, and and wonderful hand tool project as well!
  18. Now IF I can find those pictures... Friend of mine cut down and old Cedar tree. He even used parts of the 2x6 boards he cut from the tree to make a ...(wait for it..) PinNic table. However, I was able to rescue a few boards for this little chest Looks like three drawers? Welllllll Not quite, top "drawer is a fake. Bottom two are the real ones. Solid Cedar, has some secondary wood of pine inside. Mainly runners for the drawers and parts for the drawers. Three coats of Poly Gloss Chest is still in use, in the bedroom. Had to resaw on a tablesaw to get those 2x6s down to something I could work with....
  19. DAB was taking about making projects from a picture and it brought to mind this Cherry Blanket Chest I made a couple of years ago. I was working with a designer in Vermont and I'm in Alabama. She sent me this picture with the note on the top for me to build the chest by. I was told I could make my own design as long as I followed as closely as I could to the one in the picture. So I got started on it and here is the Cherry Blanket Chest that I built from the above picture and the dimensions given. I was sent a color sample to match and I used Lockwood Dye to get the color to match. If you haven't used dye you should give it a try. I sprayed the dye on and got a very nice finish. I used a combination of Router bits to make the moldings, but most of it came from one bit that was used to make small boxes. The Chest is Cedar lined and has Torsion Hinges from Rockler on the lid. The finish over the Dye is General Finishes Enduro-Var and was also sprayed on. When I finished the chest, it was crated and sent to Vermont and I wasn't told until I get picture back of the chest in place that is was going in one of four houses the client owned. This was their ski home. What was really unique about the home is that every piece of furniture in the house was custom built by a different Artisan. I was lucky enough to be chosen for the blanket chest that was at the foot of a Cherry Sleigh Bed. I have since worked with this designer on a couple of other projects.
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