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Found 7 results

  1. I was making some small bowls for fun and played around with beading as a decoration on them. I had an idea that a roll pin is hardened and round and wondered whether it could be ground for this purpose. Gave it a try and it did work after fussing with it at the grinder. Trial and error stuff. Here is what it looks like and it does work. It is a 5/16" roll pin and I get a 3/16" bead. The roll pin is mounter in a 5/16" hole drilled into a 3/8" rod. This is a sample of the bead I got with it. Then I was on YouTube and saw a small spindle gouge reground for beading. Went looking and found a Chinese made spindle gouge in my stash of auction purchases, Took it to the grinder and success was at hand. It makes a 1/4" bead. The edges of the flute are laid on the tool rest while in use and dinging them up would be bad so I found a piece of brass tubing that made the perfect guard for them. Here is the first bowl I used it on. I'm in the process of putting finish on it. It's wormy Chestnut 5" diameter. Here's the video.
  2. Frantic week here, unfortunately absolutely no time at the lathe. Our Patriot Turners- @RustyFN rough turned a bunch of bowls- In his post he tells us about the type of wood and shows us some of the blanks- Rusty also finished a beautiful mahogany bowl Check out the nice comments by our turners- Last week, @forty_caliber picked up some really nice bowl blanks. He created some awesome pieces from them Check out more from his continued post- What’s Coming Up- Lots happening in the near future. Click on the images for links to more information and registration. For The Newbies- This is copied and pasted from Ron Brown's latest newsletter. Good advice for new turners when selecting tools. Should You Use A Butter Knife For Everything? Why not? Because there are times when a butter knife just won’t cut it. Sometimes you need a butcher knife to cut up chicken, steak, or a pork roast. You might need to peel a potato or an apple or cut up ingredients for a chunky salad. It is the same thing with lathe tools. Sometimes you need to slice, other times you need to scrape, and sometimes you just need to make a lot of material go away. When I first began to learn about turning, my turning buddies thought the key to turning like the professionals was having their tool with their grind. So, I bought a new tool with every new demonstration I watched. Turns out, it isn’t the tool! I began to analyze High-Speed Steel lathe tools and it didn’t take long to realize that there are only 6 basic categories for HSS tools; 7 if you include tools for hollowing. There are many different sizes within each category and many different grinds within each category. I even developed a helpful chart so you can better visualize each one. I’ve made it available as an Instant Free Download here: We call it “Turner’s Reference Guide.” You will have to be registered, also free, and logged into your account. I recommend you print this out and post it in your shop. My recommendation is to acquire a limited number of HSS tools in each category and add different sizes and grinds as you need them. Simply having 100 HSS turning tools doesn’t make you a better turner. This I found out the hard way. Here's the link to register for Mr. Brown's newsletter. Once registered, you can download the reference guide mentioned above. "It's Free"!! https://www.ronbrownsbest.com/index.php?route=account/register Want to expand your creativity? A video from the AAW on turning a mushroom- Turned beads are a great way to add interest to almost any turning. In this video, Mike Peace demonstrates some of the tools for turning beads- Turning a bowl from a log can be done several ways and it's always good to see the method used by other turners. Here Kent Weakley demonstrates his style- And, Richard Raffan's method- Expand Your Horizons- Need to turn a thin spindle? Jim Echter shows how it's done. Awesome skew work!! Always fun to watch Mike Waldt create a new item. This is part 1 of an elderberry vase. Yet another scoop version from Alan Stratton- I happened upon this on a social media site. We are always looking for food safe methods of finishing turnings. This may, or may not, be an effective but it sure is interesting. This is a copy and paste from Debbie Coull's Instagram post ( https://www.instagram.com/p/Cj3BgYgjbrC/?igshid=MDJmNzVkMjY%3D ) so all can read it. "Sealing a food safe vessel with hot milk. No idea of the exact process as I struggled to get anything online for doing this with wood. Lots about how to do it with earthenware. So, since this is an ancient technique, I figured, keep it simple. Sycamore cereal bowl (hopefully), turned and sanded to 320. Exterior sealed with wax, interior left naked (I know the wax exterior will wash off after it's been in use and washed). Milk was heated till I burned the tip of my finger, then poured in till it lipped the rim. Now leaving it to cool. The process requires the casein protein in the milk penetrating and sealing the wood grain. I know there will be several folk comment about the milk going rancid, but I'm trusting the process. If it didn't work, then it wouldn't have been practiced for centuries." New Turning Items- Woodturners Wonders has expanded their product line to include CA adhesives. You can check out their complete selection at- https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/adhesives Everything Else- Rick Turns list of YouTube woodturning videos from last week- Safe turning
  3. I posted this in a separate listing in the Turner's Forum earlier this week but am adding it here to help spread the word. During SWAT, our most generous sponsor- Easy Wood Tools ( @Jim from Easy Wood Tools ) donated the profits from a special T-Shirt sale to the Vetsturn program provided by ToolMetrix. The Vetsturn program is looking for 8 additional qualified veterans to participate in their next session. They have posted this YouTube video with the information and additional details. Please watch this video at the YouTube site and check out the links provided for additional information and links. In addition, the following link will take you to an article in The Woodworker's Journal detailing the program- https://www.woodworkersjournal.com/vetsturn-helping-heal-ptsd-through-turning/ Our Patriot Turners- @HandyDan was kind enough to create a detailed how-to on his baby rattles. The complete steps are here- Thanks, Dan! @forty_caliber worked on rough turning some pecan bowl blanks. These surely have some gorgeous grain- More about each one can be found in these posts- "Forty" also posted a picture of some bowl blanks from which he is going to turn presents for his Mrs. The blanks are from Cook Woods- Check out his post for more about the species. @aaronc posted images of some maple limbs he cut and set aside for turning. The dark and contrasting light colors should make for some fantastic turnings. Check out his post at- @Steve Krumanaker started a large platter on which he will perform his pyrography magic! In his post, Steve shows us a bit his plan for the design- What’s Coming Up- Last week we mentioned the 2022 Christmas ornament contest was about to start. Here's the video with all of the necessary information- For The Newbies- The screw chuck is often overlooked as a method of holding pieces on the lathe. In these two Richard Raffan videos, he demonstrates using this method for several types of turnings Expand Your Horizons- Picked this up from the AAW. Using the beading tool to create some nice designs- Last week we posted a video from Alan Stratton where he turned a vase from OSB. He has since improved the end results by stabilizing the material. Bird house turnings make fine Christmas ornaments. With the ornament contest just starting, this video from Mike Peace may give you some ideas for an entry- New Turning Items- Woodturners Wonders has a sale on lights- https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/weekly-sale Everything Else- Whether you are doing an IRD, in-person demo or instructional video, these are some great tips from Ron Brown. Copied and pasted from Mr. Brown's newsletter: Start At The End That sounds backward. There is a very famous quote from Napoleon Hill, “What the mind can conceive, it can achieve.” Scripture tells us that “Where there is no vision, the people perish.” If you will take the time to see the end, the finished project, and the final result before you ever begin, all you have to do is figure out how to get there from here. If you don’t know where you are going, you’ll get there every time, and all too often, you won’t like where you ended up. In this age of YouTube, Vimeo, and TikTok videos, it aggravates me to no end when folks present a video of them making something. They start at the beginning without any preview of the finished project. You most often have no inkling of even what they are making until almost the very end. And about 90% of the time, it was something I had no interest in viewing. My plea, especially in this age of hybrid meetings including Zoom, is to begin at the end. Have examples of the finished project, or at least illustrations so folks know where you are going. Then show them how you get there. Your presentations will be much more effective when your audience knows where you expect to end up. That approach also keeps you focused on the end result of your process. As an example, let us use something as simple as turning a natural edge bowl from green wood. It could even be a limb or a branch. 1. Show a finished natural edge bowl so folks know what you are talking about. 2. Begin with a half log with the bark still attached. 3. Mount the blank in the lathe between centers with the bark side toward the headstock. 4. Bring up the live center and shape the outside of the bowl including a tenon at the tailstock end. Be sure to leave a divot in the center of the tenon. You will need it later. 5. Sand and finish everything but the tenon. 6. Turn the blank around and mount it in a 4-jaw chuck. 7. Remove the inside and turn the walls to final thickness leaving the bark attached. 8. Use a jamb chuck to press against the inside of the bowl and turn it around with the tenon toward the tailstock. 9. Use the divot you created in the center of the tenon. Place the point of your live center in the divot and lock the bowl against the jamb chuck. 10. Carefully shape, or remove, the tenon down to a small nub and finish the outside of your bowl. 11. Remove the bowl from the lathe and finish the nub by hand. 12. Since the blank was green, it will go oval. Expect it, celebrate it, love it. 13. You can leave the bowl unfinished, but my preference is to apply a few coats of Walnut Oil finish. You began by showing folks a finished Natural Edge Bowl so they knew what it should look like. Then you executed all of the steps to make one before their very eyes. When you finished, they knew what to expect and how they can do it themselves. You are a master!!! You may have been the most effective demonstrator they ever saw. Follow this recipe and you will have great success every time. Remember that wherever you go, there you are. Rick Turns list of YouTube woodturning videos from last week- Safe turning
  4. Saturday is the twentieth anniversary of 9-11. Tragic national events have a way of sticking with us and we remember exactly where we were. I have vivid memories of two such event. President Kennedy's assignation- I was in Memphis going to Navy electronics school. The 9-11 attack- I was teaching at the Vo-Tech school. Our Patriot Turners- @Fred W. Hargis Jr had a little misfortune with a small bowl he was turning. We never know just how deep some of the cracks can be in a blank- Fred asked our turners what they thought he should do at this point and he received lots of helpful advice. @Gerald teste his new laser on his hollowing rig! What a fantastic turning rig. Gerald said it is from Tim Yoder. He tells us more about this tool and some modifications in his post- Gerald was kind enough to give us information concerning some of the vendors at S.W.A.T. in a response to last week's "Wednesday's..." Our turners have also posted some of their work in other forums here on the Patriot- In the "What's On Your Weekend Agenda" section, @forty_caliber showed us a little problem he had with his lathe- Powermatic sent him a replacement for the handle. Forty also posted some turning he is doing, here- In our "Good Monday Morning" section, Forty posted a lid he is turning for the bowl pictured above- And, in our newly christened "Hump Day" section, @Fred W. Hargis Jr gives us a quick update on some handle turning- @forty_caliber made a design change in the lid for his bowl- @Gerald is setting up for a club meeting- What’s Coming Up- As a reminder, a couple of AAW associated on-line events coming up. Click on the images for links to registration. For The Newbies- New lathes usually come with a faceplate. That one may, or may not, be ideal for your needs. Alan Stratton shows us how to make several faceplates and why you might want several different types- Lacquer can make a nice finish on a turning. Here is Sam Angelo discussing use, application and thoughts on a lacquer finish- Expand Your Horizons- Carl Jacobson takes his beading and burning techniques to the next level! Has this happened to you? Someone asks you to make a turning but you discover that your lathe isn't long enough to make the piece. Here, Ernie Conover gives us techniques to overcome the problem- sorry, it's not buying a bigger lathe And, just for the heck of it, watch Tim Yoder turn a gigundous platter- New Turning Items- The folks from Woodturners Wonders have a new smaller 4-in-1 CBM wheel. This one is 6" in diameter- Check it out at- https://woodturnerswonders.com/collections/6-inch-wheels/products/6-4-in-1 Everything Else- Rick Turns' list of YouTube woodturning videos from last week- Time to replenish my stock of rolling pins. The most time consuming part of them is making the walnut and cherry inserts- which does not require any turning. I had a cherry board in the shop but needed to drag up a few walnut boards from the wood storage shed. Each insert strip needs to be 10.5" long x 2" wide and .125' thick. I got started by ripping all the boards to the 2" width and 22" long. The thicknesses varied from about 1" to 1.25"- Next, surface plane to one good side- Then I need to re-saw the pieces into thinner slices. My old Taiwanese bandsaw doesn't do well with a rip fence so I scribe a line to follow. Just a tad under 3/16" Using a re-saw post and slice off a strip- After all the boards have the thin strip removed, it's back to the planer to smooth away the saw marks for the next strip. Wash, Rinse and Repeat until all of the boards have been converted into thin strips The strips have one smooth side- from the planer, and one rough side from the re-saw operation. They are all about 3/16" thick but have slight variations. To bring them to the final thickness and remove the saw marks, out comes the shop made drum sander. The drum sander was built just for this purpose. I used to use the oscillating spindle sander and a fence but I couldn't get consistent thicknesses along the length of the inserts. Notice there is no belt feed! Also, about the maximum I can remove with one pass is .01". This is gonna take a while!!! 3 passes thru and still need about 3 or 4 more to get to .125" Safe turning and stay well
  5. The Tübatulabal are an indigenous people of the Kern River Valley area of Southern California and are related to the Aztec. The literal meaning of the name is "pine nut eaters". Stones were heated in a fire and then placed in the baskets to cook the food. This basket illusion measures 13⅝" diameter and about 3½" deep. The wood is maple. It was donated to the 2017 Christmas auction of the Woodturners of North Texas.
  6. From the album: Basket Illusion

    Bottom view of "Diamondback" Native American basket Illusion. A unique feature that I first made for the first time is the braided foot.

    © copyright 2016, Bill Boehme

  7. From the album: Basket Illusion

    This is number three in my series of Native American basket illusion turnings. It is a maple shallow bowl shape, 14½" diameter and 2¾" high, beaded and embellished with pyrography and coloring. It was donated to my woodturning club for our annual Christmas Banquet auction in 2015 and sold for $2700.

    © copyright 2016, Bill Boehme

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