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Found 4 results

  1. Think your dovetail and box joints won't come apart? My study of antiques says otherwise. But I have a solution to lock your dovetails and box joints permanently.This is my favorite woodworking tip and technique of all time. I hope you enjoy the video and find it helpful. I am looking forward to hearing feedback on experience and observations of these joints. Your friend in the shop-Todd A. Clippinger
  2. I have seen the SawStop demonstration with the hotdog a dozen times. But I always felt that it was done under premium conditions to ensure that it worked properly with optimal results. At several of the demonstrations I had questioned the demonstrators and requested that they place the hotdog in a glove so we could see the results. My request was always denied and I was always told, “You shouldn’t wear gloves at the table saw.” Well, I live in the real world where other contractors are on my equipment, we work in extremely harsh conditions, and I can’t keep control of everyone every time they use the table saw. So, even though it is unsafe, contractors wear their gloves at the table saw all the time. That is just reality. My local cabinet hardware supplier, A&H Turf, recently became an authorized SawStop dealer and so I made the request to them and they took me up on it. This video shows how far a SawStop will drag the glove into the machine before it kicks off. I hope you enjoy my version of the SawStop test and stay safe out there;) Your friend in the shop, Todd A. Clippinger Let your work be your signature.
  3. In this video I share how I cut small parts on the miter saw. I am sure this one will be cause for active commentary from the safety police and maybe the hand tool junkies for not using a fancy hand saw to cut small pieces. Well, this is the way I do it in the American Craftsman Workshop. Because if the tool doesn't make any noise and throw a rooster tail of sawdust, how am I supposed to know that any work is getting done? Hope you enjoy the video and find it helpful;) Remember to let your work be your signature. Your friend in the shop, Todd A. Clippinger Share the Love - Share the Knowledge
  4. When it comes to sharing woodworking with my grandkids, I keep it simple. In fact, I really don't care if they take a shine to woodworking, I would just rather they get the opportunity to be creative. When they come over for a visit, they don't ask if they can do woodworking, they just ask, "Can we build?" At this point, I have done very few structured projects, I usually just let the kids have at it with the bin of wood scraps. Kids don't need to be told what to build with the scraps, their imaginations kick into high gear and they figure it out naturally. I call this the "empty box effect." An empty box is an open ended toy and a child's imagination starts exploring all of the possibilities of what the box can become. The same thing happens with the wood scraps. During the kids' build sessions, there is plenty of opportunity to teach them about safety, how to use the tools, and problem solving skills. I think that both structured and unstructured projects have their own advantages and lessons to offer, so I do not necessarily value one over the other. But I will admit that structured projects require more prep time because you have to make parts in advance. When working in the shop, the kids are exposed to a limited set of dangers, but that is an inherent risk of having them in the shop. Overall, the exposure is controlled and gauged according to the abilities of each child. The fear of allowing kids into the shop will never give them the opportunity to learn self-control and respect for the tools and a somewhat hazardous environment. Personally, I don't see that it is any less hazardous letting kids ride a bike, a skateboard, or jump on a trampoline. I will not allow an unreasonable fear to keep my grandkids from such a valuable learning experience as they have in my shop. In the end, I am trying to develop a culture of activity, creativity, and exploration in my family. I think all of the benefits of this far outweigh the perceived dangers. And to think, I have not even mentioned the added benefit of the hours that the kids have spent with me, Grandpa Todd. There is enough content and lessons there for another blog. I hope you enjoy the video. Your friend in the shop- Todd A. Clippinger Leave a Legacy - Share the Love, Share the Knowledge
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