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Found 274 results

  1. If you go back to the entry prior to this "unusual ornament" you will see the block I made this one from. This one looks like it has many different designs in it and I didn't see this outcome until I stopped the lathe. I like surprises like this.
  2. Seeing that I had took all the tips off of my EWT tools not including the rougher. I started on a new project while I'm waiting for a couple tools and parts to get here to finish off the last project. I decided to go with the Walnut Claro again this round. I had a minor problem in the beginning that I didn't realize that the blank was off angled cut and was well some what lop sided to start with. Even still burned through that issue at the start and had a go with it. I had to take off quite a bit of material to get more of a cup shape with this one. For the bottom I didn't go with the mortise route since I seem to have been cutting those too deep. I guess that needs more practice on my part. I decided to go with a tennon so I could just hack it off with my new hand tooled crosscut saw. Also with some of the pointers I received in the last project I am definitely going to be trying the sanding before hollowing portion on this one as well. I'm not quite sure but I'm semi starting to like the offset pattern of the grain on this one.
  3. I have been experimenting with the UV clear finish that dries in seconds when exposed to a UV light or the sun. The sun. is much quicker. I got a surprise when I coated this ornament and took it to the sun. The Walnut looks normal, until it is exposed to the sun and then turns purple, (almost glows) but returns to normal again when out of the sun. It is the only wood so far that does that. Can anyone guess what I turned into this piece in the center. It is chrome like and comes from a entirely different source and I wondered "What if?"
  4. This is a project that use a LOT more than just the CNC but I decided to put it here anyway. Please move it if necessary. Started yesterday with some cutoff pieces of Walnut, finished it today, shipping it to NY on Monday. Finished in Nitrocellulose lacquer. When your planer isn't big enough and the CNC is... Enjoy! David
  5. I'm building some walnut bedside tables with 24" circular tops. For visual interest...and because it'll be fun... I'd like to use 12 alternating maple and walnut angled segments in a sun burst pattern. Ive gotten far enough to understand that the angles need to be 30°...I think. Do I cut each angle side at 15° ? Please help a mathematically challenged old man. And, muchas gracias!!!
  6. I made this in my tiny little shop (man, I’d really LOVE to have a window). Two are #4 hard maple shaker boxes with African mahogany tops. Also made two #3 shaker boxes from walnut with butternut tops. Hit them with some natural danish oil and after they dry for about 3 days or so, I’ll shoot them with about 4 coats of a satin poly. The hardest part for me is milling the stock to 1/16th of an inch....I seen to be able to get a better result on my table saw instead of the bandsaw....anyhow, I hope all youse guys are staying safe and healthy! I can’t wait until this comes to an end.
  7. lew

    Candle Box And Holders

    From the album: Candle Holders

    Turned walnut candle stick holders with candle box

    © Lewis Kauffman

  8. I am not a woodsman and have NOT seen many walnut trees. This is more than 4 ft at the base and the main section of the trunk weighed 23,000 lbs. The near perfect trunk did not have rot in it or any big bad areas. The limbs are bigger than the trees I've seen. Wow!
  9. First batch of ornaments for the year. Mostly maple, cherry, and walnut, there are a couple sycamore globes. There is one sea urchin ornament, that one has ebony finials. We spent a few days on Jacksonville beach with my wife's brother and his wife. Two of our best friends in the world. Picked some sea urchins and this ornament will go to them as a remembrance. Most of these are dyed "inside out". A couple local gift shops sell a few of these and those are the most popular. To me, it's hard beat just plain wood grain. Thanks for looking! Steve
  10. From the album: John Morris's Hand Tools

    I got in the shop a little and decided to make my own layout tools, starting with the ever so useful 6" square. Since it's the most used size in my work, it's a good jumping off point. Then I'll create a smaller 3" followed up by a few larger squares. I love how this one feels, and you know what? No more accidental scratching or marring of wood surfaces like you may get with steel squares.
  11. Finally got to try a deep hollow form, not real deep, about 13". First time I've tried something like this and there is lots to learn. The laser diode I was using wasn't the best choice and it wouldn't stay in one spot. Because of that and my own inexperience this piece is just too thin in a couple areas. It won't get much sanding because there is a very real possibility of sanding through. Still, for a first effort, I've got to be happy with the results. I also know there is a lot of room for improvement, especially in the form and getting a consistent thickness. Anyway, here is my first effort and a short video of the hollowing process. The base could be a little smaller and the funnel could also be smaller I think. I was surprised how difficult the big cove was to do and I can see there is room for improvement there as well. Wife says she loves it and I have to finish it but you know how they are. Thanks for looking Steve
  12. I've got a beautiful piece of walnut on the lathe, trying to do a hollow form about 14" deep and about the same major diameter. Drilling to start hollowing this morning and when I backed out to clear chips this is what I saw. No drill bit, this is a bad thing. At this point I'm over 10" deep with this bit. Fortunately I was drilling in steps and had made a good portion of the hole larger already. What now? Couldn't reach it with anything and there are chips packed tight around it. My first thought was, no way to save this. Still, I started picking at the shavings and blowing them out until they were pretty well clear, that took about an hour. After several failed attempts with rare earth magnets, screw drivers, etc. etc. I got the idea to make a loop in a piece of tie wire and slip it over the shaft. Held the wire with a pair of vice grips and ran the lathe slow. With a little help, the wire wound tight enough I could wiggle the drill bit a little using the wire and a screw driver. After about two hours I was able to get a purchase on the bit with a pair of deep reach needle nose and worked it the rest of way out. Next time, I'll be sure to clear chips more often and make doubly sure the set screws in my extension are tight. I think it will be faster that way. Steve
  13. Have a current order for honey dippers, this is the first batch of 20 finished. Some of the these have some really nice grain in the lids. Steve
  14. Several years ago, WOOD magazine did a project, a "wood turned walking stick". It didn't happen very often but this particular project just spoke to me and I had to make it. That's kind of funny because at the time, if I'm being honest, I couldn't really call myself a wood turner. My lathe was a shopsmith and I turned a spindle if I just had to. Anyway, I ended up making several of those walking sticks for gifts or personal use. I have decided to revisit the project and hit the highlights of it for the May demo for our club. It's a very straight forward thing to make except for the handle. I have a handle on the lathe, have turned it and done some shaping. Still a little more to do but it's coming along. Two things are different this time around. In the article, a compass is let into the handle with a cavity under it for matches, a map, or whatever. Those compasses are no longer available and I haven't been able to find a substitute so I'll just round the top. The other thing that's different is the EWT negative rake insert I now have in my arsenal. They are perfect for shaping the finger slots. Here's a WIP picture. Still some tweaking to do on this one but I'm happy with it to this point. The neat thing about this walking stick is, it's made in four pieces so a person doesn't need a real long bed to do it. One of the best WOOD projects ever IMO. Steve
  15. Well, it is time to share about what's happening with Ron Dudelston, John Moody and myself as we are hanging out together for a few days down in "Moody-Ville" aka Florence, Alabama. My wife Tami and I are on a 2+ week vacation visiting with our son and daughter in law in Indianapolis, IN as well as seeing some other friends in Indiana (including Ron and Dorothy Dudelston) and making a road trip down to Florence, Alabama to hang out with John and Beth Moody. We always have a great time together visiting, laughing and eating way too much food and our wives love to get out together to do some shopping and socializing. But one thing that we have never done before together as woodworkers is to do a woodworking project together. So on this trip Ron, John and I are working a project together to make an heirloom cedar lined walnut blanket chest for my soon to be born (in November this year) grand daughter. Being that I live in California, I could make the blanket chest but transporting it back to Indiana is not an option unless I wanted to drive it across the country. So since we were all going to be together in Alabama I talked with Ron and John about making the chest together and then when Tami and I drive back up to Indianapolis with the Dudelston's in their van we can bring the chest with us. So this weekend the 3 of us have been building the blanket chest in John Moody's shop. The plan is to complete the construction and final sanding and when we get it back to my kid's house I will put the exterior finish on it. So here are a few photos of Ron and John ( since I am taking the pictures) in the shop as we work on the blanket chest. Today we got all the rough walnut milled down and glued up into panels. Tomorrow after church we will do the assembly, lining the interior with cedar and doing the final sanding. Here are the rough walnut boards before milling. Rough cutting the to length. All boards rough cut. Running all the boards through the planer. All the boards completely cut and milled to size and thickness. Cutting the slots for biscuits before gluing up the panels. End and side panels glued u Top glued up
  16. I had a nice day last weekend, I was in my shop for most of it, just tooling around and getting reacquainted with my clean shop! So I started back in on my claro walnut rocker. I had some issues with the legs to the seat joint so I spent some time truing up the joint's (different post later tonight) and after wards I still had some considerable shaping to do with my right angle grinder. So I put a 60 grit disk on the grinder and went to town on the rear portion of the seat, I had some dishing out to do that I started last year but got side tracked away from it. It took me about 15 minutes to get it to where it was evened out, and ground out past the depth gauge holes I drilled in at the beginning of the project. Grinding these seats out is fun, you get to see a shape take shape quickly, but you really have to watch it, don't get over zealous, there is a point of no return that will trash this seat in a millisecond. There is a pucker factor when you get to a certain point. But the end result is rewarding. I sanded the seat out to 80 grit with my new USA ROS Sanding disks and the seat is looking good, more pics later. The seat is really rough right now, we are just starting to create the chiseled lines around the front edge and sides that we'll hold too throughout the project, once established you cannot hit them with anything, they need to stay sharp and crisp. You can see how lines need to be held once established in this image of the last walnut rocker I built. Those lines are established very early on, and sometimes it's easy to sand through them if you are not alert. Don't ask me how I know!
  17. I have been working on this custom green egg table and got it all finished and delivered Saturday. So this is my SketchUp drawing of the table and how it should look. And below is the table that was finished and delivered and the Extra Large Green Egg and a Baby Egg. The table is cedar with a solid top. Between the cedar boards are 1" strips of Walnut. The skirts around the table are Walnut. The outside legs are 4" cedar and the inside support legs are 3" square. Are the shelves are cedar. I use 4" casters and the two in the front are lockable. This was a very nice table and the customer was excited. He didn't know that I was going to do the Walnut accents. He really loves walnut but thought the table was going to be all cedar. I just love it when you can surprise them and they really like what you have done with the project. Well we are working on more so I will post more pictures of other custom tables.
  18. John Morris

    Walnut Rocker Seat

    From the album: Walnut Rocking Chair

    Before the finish is applied the chair is sanded to 800 then buffed to 1200 Abralon. The chair is already shining before the first finish goes on.
  19. From the album: Walnut Rocking Chair

    The joints in these chair is known as the "money shot". They are really pleasing to the eye, but in the manufacturing process of the leg to seat joints, the process can go from great to disaster in milliseconds, and the project could be ruined. I am happy when the seat joint operations are completed! In this image, the first coat of finish is not applied yet, the sheen you see is purely from sanding through the grits, up to a 1000 abralon pad.
  20. DuckSoup

    Tick Tock

    Finished these up, both are Steve Good patterns. Oval clocks are about 9" tall mahogany & walnut, mantel clock is 5' *10" walnut, purpleheart & maple. 1" thick with a 2" clock insert.
  21. Well, still had a plank of Walnut sitting around in the shop. 6/4 by 10" by 4' long. Decided (for some strange reason) to try to resaw the plank to something a bit thinner..... Clamped it up on the bench. Ran a jointer plane along the edges. End closest to the camera? I wasn't about top plane THAT much off. Found a stick of Oak, and a couple c clamps. Plan was to go as deep and straight as I could, and work my way around all four edges.....that WAS the plan... Saw didn't like this kind of work. Either bogged down, or pulled to one side. Tried an end cut Not the best. Once all four edges wer molested...er...cut. The plan was to use the bandsaw or a handsaw to finish the through cut.....handsaw was a fail...need a real one of about 4-5ppi. Bandsaw? Plank was about 1" too tall. #@#@@! So, slapped the plank onto the bench, marked a line right down the center, and used the circular saw to rip in into two halfway sawn planks. Tried the smaller pieces on the bandsaw, again....blade seems to be duller than Ferris Bueller's High School teacher......merely wanted to do curves......Resaw fenced the circular saw? Nah, just mark a line and saw with the circular saw... These are the "good" sides....the other faces will need a LOT of scrub plane work to get flat....I will also need to joint the edges a lot better. Then, with the rest of my "leftovers' A little fuzzy, was a bit tired and shaky.....Also have a 8/4 plank of Oak to mill down a bit. Single Brain Cell Sketch Up is working out the details for what to do with this pile of......wood. Might take awhile.....hard to tell what will get cobbled together......of course, that is what i said about the table I just finished up......stay tuned, the cussing has already started...
  22. From the album: John Morris's Hand Tools

    I built this square from left over Walnut from some project eons ago, and the Curly Maple is scrap from a Shaker Rocker I am currently building. The two pins are of Walnut as well. They are through-pins.
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