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  1. Most anyone who visits this forum will know I spent a week at Marc Adams in September. The guest teacher was Glenn Lucas. During that week I had the opportunity to use some of his signature bowl gouges. I was very impressed with the cut I got from them, enough so that I ordered his 1/2", 5/8", and the 5/8" bottom feeder bowl gouges. This is the first bowl I've used them on. It is hard maple, twice turned, harder than nails, and about 9" in diameter. In the picture I have sanded it with 150 grit only. I used a 3" disk in my drill and this is after about 5 minutes. In this picture the rim has not been sanded at all. It is the first time ever I started sanded with anything other than 60 or 80 grit on the inside of a bowl. I could start with 150 grit because there was virtually no tear out, even in the "problem" areas. FWIW, I have since finished sanded the bowl inside and I started with 320 grit on the rim. This is not meant to be a recommendation to buy his tools. I'm sure the techniques I learned from him contributed as well. It's not unusual for me to spend an hour or more sanding a bowl this size. I might have had 15 minutes on this one. Steve
  2. A few ornaments from the latest run. There were 17 in this batch. Actually have started another 10 or so, that will probably be the last of them for this year. Steve
  3. Just finished up 12 more ornaments, I think that will do it for this year. That will give me about 45 altogether. Some will go in gift shops but many will be gifted. Anyway, I had a piece of spalted beech, heavily spalted but still solid enough to hollow, kind of unusual. Did one with walnut accents and one with maple. I like the walnut one for the contrast but then, I like the maple one too. Steve
  4. Some may remember I posted pictures of a hollow form I was drilling and the forstner bit got stuck deep inside. Happily, I eventually got the bit unstuck and was able to continue. Even more happily, the vessel was dry enough to finish this week. Here it is, third coat of oil just applied. It will probably get two or three more coats before I'm done. Keep in mind, the oil is freshly applied so it will lose a little shine. It's about 14" tall and 12" major diameter. I have to tell you I was nervous, nervous while turning off the bottom. Afraid I was going to through. Walnut, what can you say? Steve
  5. My wife and I were out of town recently and had a couple motel stays. At one of the motels I saw this vase. I want to stress, this is NOT my work. Anyway I saw this wooden vase. My first thought was to see if it were turned by a local artist. Naturally I picked it up, it must've weighed 30 pounds or more. As turners, we are conditioned to turn thin and get things as light as possible so the weight kind of threw me. This vase is at least 3/4" thick, maybe more. When I turned it over I saw that was imported from Indonesia. Still it's pretty wood. I then saw the inside. Once again, we are conditioned and taught that everything has to be sanded and finished to nth degree. This piece, at least on the inside can only be described as crude and rough. Lots of tool marks, lots of tear out. Not something I would ever let leave the shop, just wouldn't. Looking at closer, I noticed the bottom, it has to be at least 3" thick on the bottom, crude, crude, crude and rough. Not up to my standards at all. When I got the chance I showed to my wife. She says; "it's beautiful". Honestly, I have to agree with her about that, from a distance it's very pretty. I pointed out how heavy it was, she says; " it feels really substantial and won't get tipped easily" I like it. I pointed how thick it was, she says; "it's beautiful" "I really like it" I started to point out how thick it was on the bottom, but she interrupted me and said; "someone bought it, didn't they?" What can you say to that? Steve
  6. Finally got the walnut hollow form off the lathe, actually, it's been "off" the lathe several times over the past couple of weeks. Gerald had mentioned in another thread I might have problems with my laser and he was right, it was too heavy and wanted to move all over the place. Had to address that. Had some other issues and some other projects got in the way. This is my second attempt at hollowing something deep and it was probably a little too ambitious for me. Have to keep telling myself, this is a learning process and that was the main purpose for this piece. Next one will probably be smaller. Anyway, here's a pic, it's about 16" tall and about 14" major diameter. It will go in a sack to dry and then get remounted for turning off the tenon and sanding. Close to 1/4" through out, a little thicker here, a little thinner there. Still learning you see. Steve
  7. I've still got at least dozen of the natural edge walnut pieces to finish up. Was kind of between projects and decided to sand and finish this one. I chose this one because it looked like my cuts were decent and it wouldn't take as much sanding as some of the others. It's about 16X12X5.5. The bark is just really nice on this one I think. It was just about to big for my little photo booth. Steve
  8. Just finished another decorative platter. This one is 12" diameter and 1/8" thick. It is basically the same pattern as before but drawn a little differently and it shows a spline much better. This really is the effect I've been trying to get and I'm very happy with this one. The rose was drawn in Inscape and engraved with my little laser. The shading on the rose was done by hand and I've got a lot to learn about all that. Thanks for looking!! Steve
  9. Our wood turning club meeting is today and the demo is my responsibility. I am doing a Glenn Lucas project(sort of) a "traditional Irish platter". I downloaded his video on it a year ago or so. Over the last few weeks I've turned probably 10 platters while practicing, editing notes, etc. etc. Most of the ones I've turned are from plain soft maple and are nothing special. I wanted to do one out of a nice piece of wood and had a walnut platter blank just had some really nice grain in it. Moisture meter said it was ready so I went after it. This piece of wood fought me through the whole process. There were a couple areas that no matter what I tried there was still tear out. Tried sheer scraping, stiffening the fibers with finish and/or oil. Push cut, pull cut, sharpen tools, no matter, there was just tear out. Eventually, I had taken so many cuts, thickness became an issue and I couldn't follow the profile of Glenn's design. Still, after MUCH sanding it looked pretty nice I thought. It had everything, some really nice feathering from a crotch and it just glowed. I could tell it moved a little while turning but I wasn't worried. I'd left a decent raised rim on the bottom and the very center was mortised. After finishing, it just kept moving and moving. You can see it a little in this picture This picture gives a better idea just how much this piece of wood moved. It has a serious cup and I have to say "this platter rocks" LOL. I will still take it for my demo. Glenn actually talks about where to get a platter blank from a log and what can happen otherwise. This will illustrate his point nicely I think. Steve
  10. I got to spend some time on my steady rest today, more importantly, I got the wheels for it. Over last weekend I went to several second hand stores, a couple sports stores, walmart, and a skating rink trying to find inline skate wheels. Finally, I broke down and ordered some from amazon. They make great bearings for a steady rest. Thought about buying the Carter steady rest but that was before I checked the price. One sized to fit my lathe is close to six hundred bucks, WOW! Carter makes quality products but that's way more than I wanted to spend. This one is 3 layers of 3/4" plywood laminated with fiber glass cloth between the layers. It is VERY rigid. The center layer is cutout to accept a 3/4" by 2" spoke that will carry the inline skate wheel. There is another spoke outside of the glue-up to form a fork for the wheel axle which is a 5/16" bolt. It should easily support anything I want to turn up to about 18" in diameter. Still some rough edges to profile and round and I have to make a couple spacers here and there but I should get it done tomorrow or Monday. Then, fabricate the arm and clamp for my laser and I'll be ready to go!! Steve
  11. I don't make a lot of boxes. No particular reason, just not something that really appeals to me. I've had a basket weave pattern in my mind and wanted to do it on a smaller item before attempting it on a larger one. So, for some reason I decided to do a box. Since I had planned to embellish this box, I wondered if I could hide the join between the top and the bottom so I planned my pattern with that in mind. Then, I wondered, could I trick people about where the top and the bottom meet. So, I made it upside down, kind of. Anyway, here's the pictures, this is my sort of upside down, basket weave, maple box. It's about 4" high and a couple inches in diameter. I really haven't figure out how to terminate one of these basket weaves, I can see it in my mind but it just doesn't work when I try to draw it. At any rate, the wife says she likes this so that's good enough for me. This is the top. The bottom, I know I use this "phicops" pattern a lot but I just really like it. Opened and the inside, the join is about 3/4" from the bottom as the box is sitting upright. I'm hoping to have some fun with this at our meeting next Sunday. I believe most people will think the join is near the obvious "top" and try to open it there. We'll see. Steve
  12. I've been thinking of how to write this post for a few days. I am a member, and now (unbelievably) president of the Northeast Indiana Turners and Chiselers, a wood turning club near Ft. Wayne IN. Anyway, we had a visitor at our last meeting, a retired guy(are all turners retired?). He said he was trying to turn some table legs and they were "all fuzzy". He wanted to know if there was anyone who could visit his shop and show him what he's doing wrong. It happens he lives about ten mile from me and I did visit his shop the other day. Where to start? He's trying to turn pine, about 36" long and 1 1/2" diameter and he doesn't have a steady rest. It would've been nearly impossible to do what what he was trying to do. It didn't help that his tools are very dull. The really bad thing though, is his lathe, it's a Grizzly. I don't know the model number but it swings 14", with a very small variable speed motor. Worse, the ways looked to be 1/8" or less C-channel. Very, very light duty. If I had to guess I would say the lathe weighed less than 100lbs. I'll admit I'm not a Grizzly fan but neither am I a basher. This lathe though, to me it's little more than stealing to sell such a piece of equipment. I'm not sure a person could even turn a pen on it, let alone a 12 or 14" bowl. The guy told me he bought the lathe to see if he would like wood turning. I told him I could guarantee he wouldn't like it if he had to use that lathe. It made me wonder, how many people have bought that lathe, or a similar product to see if they would like turning only to give it up and never know what turning is really like Steve
  13. Said he had some "goodies" for me. All cherry with some really nice crotch pieces. Just when I thought I was done roughing bowls for awhile Always a conundrum when I get cherry, do I make bowls or brisket? He left with a nice walnut natural edge bowl and some beers but I think I got the best deal! Steve
  14. I say that just about every time but this one could be special I think. About 19" diameter and five inches deep. Spectacular grain and markings in it as well. There's going to be a bit of sanding and I'll probably let it dry for a couple months but if it turns out I'm going to call it "ET" Steve
  15. There was a lot more sap wood in this bowl than I expected. Still, the bark stayed on well and it warped nicely without cracking. The sapwood also makes a nice contrast I think. The bottom side. Steve
  16. I knew where there was a large walnut coming down and stopped by to see if any of the wood was available. Guy told me the trunk was sold(14' to the first limb, 33" diameter) it was a huge tree, but what did I want? I told him I'd like a few of the crotch pieces if possible. This is what they saved for me. I am stunned and he'll get a couple nice bowls for sure! Steve
  17. Magnolia Woodturners, a Mississippi Chapter of the American Association of Woodturners was chartered July 20, 1996 for individuals interested in woodturning. The primary purpose of the Magnolia Woodturners Inc. is consistent with the fundamental purposes of the American Association of Woodturners, to provide information, education, and organization of those interested in turning wood. In addition, Magnolia Woodturners Inc. purposes are to: 1. Provide a meeting location for woodturners...maps and directions..... 2. Share ideas regarding woodturning, including lathes, tools, turning materials, turning techniques and designing of turned objects 3. Exchange wood and other woodturning materials. 4. Inform members about activities of interest to woodturners. 5. Promote woodturning as an art form and craft.
  18. Charles Nicholls

    TopMaple.JPG

    From the album: Throw Tops

    Maple top that I made today. It's made with 3 1x pieces of maple that are glued together and then turned.
  19. Saw this on FB this morning and as a wood turner it spoke to me. It was my first intention to post it in the turning forum but I think it's relevant to every aspect of wood working. Steve
  20. A few of you might remember me posting about this stopper the other day, saying that i would post again when it was done. Well, here it is I am very pleased with the way it turned out. I used a wipe on poly from Minwax. This has one of Ruth Niles hardware pieces in it. It actually allows the stopper to stand on its end. Thoughts and critiques always welcome.
  21. Charles Nicholls

    File Handles

    From the album: Handles

    A few chainsaw file handles I have made recently
  22. Hello all. Here's what I will be doing this weekend, making tops and other items. This one is pretty much complete, It just needs a bit of sanding and finish. I was hoping it was going to be a bit wider so that it might balance a bit better but it still should work. I'll try throwing it tomorrow after the glue sets and see how it does.
  23. From the album: Throw Tops

    Maple top that I made recently. It's made with 4 1x pieces of maple that are glued together on a square piece of beech for the center.
  24. From the album: Finished projects

    This started off as a segment bowl made from a Bradford Pear from my parents land. The base and rim came from some reclaimed oak. After I gave it to my wife, she asked that I turn it into a yarn bowl. Cringing, I reluctantly cut the swirl into it. Its a bit thicker walled than I normally do. Finish is 7 coats of shellac.
  25. Hi guys, i started on this project several days ago and just got it finished today. It is one of the pens I recently purchased a kit for that I hope will be a good seller for this time of year. The pen is quite heavy due to the wood used which is Bocote, but mainly because it is brass too. It's sure to get a few looks
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