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Found 35 results

  1. Someone gave me a box of what they called "junk". A lot of nuts and bolts and such but this little guy caught my eye. I had seen this used once at the Boat Repair place. When I asked what it was he told me important not a toy. Okay I got that a lot. On my JET 17 inch drill press they have the quill stop lock as two knurled nuts you tighten. Don't know what thread but it takes forever to run them up and down. Would be nice to have something easier. Sure they offer some but the ones I found were wrong size and $35. So this stop is 1/2 - 20. I have threaded rod that fits it. Tried the regular zinc and found the fit rather sloppy. When I tried a piece of galvanized it was tight. So I cut the rod to length then milled the end of the rod down to 3/8 and threaded it for a nut. This allowed me to attach it to my drill press using existing holes. Had to cut a nut in half so it wasn't so tall. As @steven newman would say, we have ways. That done I did a test fit and found I did not like the return hitting so hard so I used a nylon washer to absorb the shock. Both washers were a tad bigger in diameter. So I used some hot glue to keep them in place but allow for easy removal later. Don't want all that mess vibrating and making noise. After an hour of work I have a drill press quill stop that is easy to set to any depth without any modifications to the original set up. Cost, nothing except some time. Had everything I needed in stock in the shop. This was old quill stop mechanism. Pictures tell a better story sometimes. Here is end result.
  2. So my old drill press is having issues; high pitch bearing whine at top speed (which I use a lot for drilling scrollsaw fretwork patterns), 40+ years old off brand (bought used 40 years ago), chuck just failed, one tooth lower than the other two, can't center a bit. don't know if I can get the morse taper out now (had to use loctite, lowest strength, to get the chuck to stay in the machine) at the time, 30 years ago, I was using a drum sander in the press and any side pressure would make the chuck fall out. loctite fixed it and it has not been removed since. So fix or replace? Brand recommendations for a chuck would be nice. This is not a production machine just general usage and holes for fretwork. If I replace it I want a press that has the same type of table that I currently have, i.e. round table with a round mount/clamp. Tractor Supply has a low end model for $269. All the higher end models I've seen have the square/cantilevered tables, don't really want that style. Thoughts?
  3. My oldest daughter and I make a craft item that we sell. I have made several different sleds to cut the material but have needed a way to locate a pilot hole for a screw eye exactly in the center with out measuring. The craft item varies greatly in size depending upon what material I am cutting. My first effort worked, somewhat, but with sales increasing I needed something better. This was made from a wooden hand clamp from Harbor Freight and scraps from the shop. Part of the scraps was a section of maple bowling alley. The first picture is the finished jig. The second picture is of the core of the unit. The threaded rod from the hand clamp is held in place so when it is turned the jaws would open. Did you know that you cannot find a left-hand acme nut? To hold the rod in place I made thick washers from some UHMW and held them and the rod in place with a nail acting as a roll pin. The most important part of this was making sure the wood and washers’ thickness was so, when the jaws were close, they both were snug against the wood. The third picture is how I had to modify the clamp jaw. I had to drill a relief, so the washes were not in the way of the jaw closing. By clamping the jaws to the center block I was able to drill holes for guide rods. This was necessary to keep the jaws parallel since I was only using one of the threaded rods to operate the unit. The fourth picture shows how I had to cut the center block and the jaws for an aluminum track. The fifth picture shows the completed unit at my drill press. Sorry the picture is up-side down, but I tried to correct it, but nothing worked. The sixth picture is another view of the jig where you see a black knob to the left. Once the jig is centered and clamped to the drill press table, I need to move the jig to place the bit over the place I want the hole and then tighten it down. I made a centering block to positioning the jig. I located the center of the block and drilled the hole. I then turned the block 180 degrees to test it. I was off by 1/132” Not bad. That is more than enough for the craft item.
  4. Boy these Cornhole games sure are popular. Our neighbor's daughter is getting married this May and they asked me if I could build a couple Cornhole boards for them, they are going to have games at the wedding reception. I only first heard of this game because of @John Moody, John is the resident Cornhole builder in our community. So I know what little I do know by John's work, and I just scanned the internet really quick to get the regulation sizes of everything and I set to building their boards from wood I had left over from other projects. I have not had a full day in the shop in two years, really, no kidding, life has been quite a challenge and I was so happy to just get this day to make some dust on such a basic project, I loved it. I had my folk music going in the shop, a little bit of Johnny Cash, some Del McCoury and Bill Monroe, and tapered the day off with Hank and Waylon, man what a joyous day. It was just one of those days that lined up perfectly to do some "me" time and the family was completely ok with it. Also, I got to really get into my Shopsmith! And what a blast I had with it. So, I know they are just Cornhole boards, but what's more important, is that I had a day of fun, so if you want to see some boards, read on! I set up my outfeed table configuration to handle some mid size panels for the Cornhole boards. Ripped a couple pre-prefinished 3/4" panels I had left over from a prior project, I am getting used to my Shopsmith today. I then set up my outfeed table to handle ripping some narrow boards, the table needs to be set at the center of the table saw or in line with the blade, it was a quick operation, part of using these Shopsmith's is knowing what they are capable of, and how to maximize their ability, I am not there yet, I am only discovering the surface of what these machines are capable of. I pushed the oak boards through with minimal effort. Then I joined each board just to clean up the edges and to have a nice mating edge to the underside of the surface board. I need to align my Shopsmith fence as you can see a tad burning on the oak edge. I have not adjusted my Shopsmith yet since I purchased it, the gent I bought it from had it sitting in his garage for 15 years with no use, so no doubt I need to tune up the alignment. I have however oiled the sheeves and other areas and I tensioned the drive belt to specs before I used it. I used good ol pocket holes to mount the sides of the boards up to the surface board. I drilled out all my pocket holes first. Then I set to screwing the boards to the underside of the Cornhole deck. I swear Shopsmith and Rigid have a secret relationship, because my Rigid Shopvac hose is the perfect size for the table saw dust port, and the jointer dust port. I cut a small radius on the end of the back cornhole board legs, so they'll fold up and down easily. This bandsaw is really nice, I can't believe how something small and seemingly very simple in design, is so accurate and easy to use. I aint kidding folks, I like it better than my 15" Grizz I had. A very strong feature of the Shopsmith is the Drill Press operation, it's sweet, I like it, I am happy. Quiet, accurate, with an adjustable table for in and out, and up and down and of course since the power head operates the Drill Press, it's variable speed. Drilling the holes out for the carriage bolts. The back folding legs are mounted, you flip them up and lock them down by tightening the wingnuts, I used a 5/16" carriage bolt, washer and wingnut. Legs up. I still have to cut out the 6" diameter Cornholes, but mission basically accomplished. Our neighbors should like them, she is going to paint a mural on the deck of the Cornhole board, I think the LA Dodgers symbol. Any my baby put to sleep, she did well today, I was please with the operations, and I became more efficient at the changeovers, I am getting good at operating my Shopsmith, and it's turned out to be a great machine for my purpose, and, mama gets to park her car in the garage now! I hope John Moody approves of the way I made these boards, and if anyone has any tips on the building Cornhole boards I am all ears, I may do some for my family as well, not sure yet, depends if the kids want them or not. If you want to build your own boards, here is the site that John Moody directed me too, they have all the information and specs for them there. https://www.playcornhole.org/ Thanks for sharing a part of my day with me folks.
  5. From the album: Sam Maloof Site Visit 2019

    Old hand drill press mounted outside the shop of Maloof
  6. Delta Floor Model Drill Press. I currently have it mounted on a 1 1/2" thick plywood base with wheels underneath which raises the whole thing about 4 1/2" above the floor. It's always felt a bit too high. My other recent post concerning adding an auxiliary table will make the work surface even higher. So I'm thinking that I should re-do the mobile base to get the work surface lower to the ground. Again, I've seen several designs and would appreciate your suggestions. Due to my 'shop' size I would like to keep the drill press mobile. I also thought about making a standing platform....hinge it to the front of the base to flip up when not in use or flip down when I need to do some drilling.
  7. I have a floor model Delta press and I would like to build an auxiliary table top for it. I've seen lots of plans and designs. I kind of like the Woodsmith version that has a pivoting fence system. Recommendations and comments, please.
  8. I made this firetruck for my grandson 12 years ago. I went to the internet to get ideas. I used exotic woods where I could. The ladder (curly maple) extends and swivels. The hose comes off the reel and cranks back up. I painted in all the gauges. I didn't have a lathe at that time and made the wheels and rims with the drill press. The lug bolts are tacks I found. He still loves it and is displayed in his room
  9. From the album: John's Shop

    My Smitty in drill press mode. I love my Smitty!
  10. Drilling a 4" circle in a hunk of ply it hit a hard spot and yanked it outta my hand. WhiZZZ BANG into my right side of the solar plexus. Knocked the daylights outta me. I got the machine shut down and then shock set in. I was a little dazed for a bit. Got a really nice bloody welt for my runner up prize. Full One Horse Motor too. To drill the rest of the holes ( there are lots of 'em) I set up a capture for the boards. Don't gotta tell me twice. It's an error that - - - well - - - wouldn't have happened on my old DP because the column would have stopped it And there's my thing. I have an obsolete habit that was fine under the older conditions. But this DP is a big Radial and the rules are all different. Gotta learn the new rules.
  11. Perusing Craigslist and found this wonderful example of a Shopsmith 10ER here in So Cal. And it's sister sitting beside it, both for $350.00. The ER in front was restored, if only I was ready to go down that road, I'd a snapped it up in a heart beat! Love the way they look.
  12. I am curious, I have looked all over for an example of a Mark V mounted on a cabinet roll away similar to the 10er's. But have found none. I am curious why? I see plenty of SS's with a cabinet built to sit underneath, but what I am looking for are any ideas for building one that the Mark V can set on, thus eliminating the factory legs. It seems simple enough, but there must be a variable in design I am not seeing, that prevents this from happening. Any help is greatly appreciated. Shopsmith 10er on table, can this be done with a Mark V? Now just imagine a Mark V, I'd like to build a roll away cabinet for the Mark V to sit on, with drawers and doors. And flip down stop caster axles incorporated somehow, so just like the Mark V stand, with a flick of my foot, the cabinet rest on the ground.
  13. I have a manual drill press ACME that was used as a yard ornament for years and now stands in my wife’s flower garden. I have had it there for about 20 years. It is rusted but on close inspection and it is not too bad. Every now and then someone will stop and ask if I want to sell it. It is frozen down where you can’t turn the manual wheel. I don’t want to force it and break it. It is a favorite but never gets used. My wife refuses to turn the handle. Preston
  14. I have a small HF drill press that had a plastic collar to hold the depth stop. It was too flexible to be accurate, so I made a new one out of a piece of 1/4" thick aluminum. Herb
  15. Perfect spheres with a drill press on the lathe? Might just work.
  16. I have been wanting to hook up my vav to my drill press. I gave it some thought and came up with this. I used super magnets, an old lamp flex shaft and Dap Rapid Fuse glue. (It was free, from an offer on this site.) It held really great, however you must remember it is a CA glue and must be handled as CA. I custom made a wood block with 3 small super magnets and two large iron magnets. I put it on the bed post so it would always follow the work. It works really well and stays in place. The flex allows easy positioning.
  17. Saw this advertised on CL tonight...Something I'd never seen before & thought it was too cool not to share... Pictures are from the actual posting... https://fortwayne.craigslist.org/tls/6081346611.html
  18. This video is a really slick way of finding and drilling true center without the lathe. We all have had a piece that we couldn't find center after removing from the lathe, because of poor planning.
  19. I needed to mount various vices and jigs to my drill press; this is what I came up with: I mounted a 1 1/2" floor flange to 3/4 ply with #14 screws, ground one side of a 1 1/2" nipple to fit the clamp on the DP. Now when I need to change jigs I loosen the DP clamp, lift the current jig and replace with what I need tighten and away I go. thoughts?
  20. Simple survey. What should be the next tool band saw or bench drill press? If it's band saw, bench top or floor model? My primary source of wood are old pallets. my next big project will be a long book case with doors and offset shelves
  21. About seven weeks ago I was scanning thru some on line ads when I came across one for an "antique " drill press. The ad was accompanied by this rather poor picture. What I saw was enough to get my interest as a first blush it looked like a 14" delta. I sent the seller a note telling him I was interested but lived a two hour drive away so could he send more pictures. These are what he sent. It sure looked Deltaish but I did have some questions. I called him and he told me it had absolutely no identifying marks .It was a 14", column was 2 3/4" , it was the right overall height. Still I had concerns ; the spring return did not look right, the stop rod collar looked odd, the motor mount was different, the collar for the table was different. What was this press? I searched over on the Vintage Machinery site for a like machine. No luck ,the closest was still a Delta. A review of old Delta catelouges revealed a 1933 floor model which seems to be Delta's first that had some differences from the 220. Could this be one of those. Another phone call and conversation. Finally I could not stand it any longer and made an offer conditional on there being a front pulley cover. He insisted it did not have one but I told him the pictures gave a clue to it's existence and would he remove the metal shroud and check. He was amazed, as he said "one magically appeared". Okay sold said I and arranged for a payment via the web. So now I owned what might be an early 1930's Delta two hours away. As it happens my daughter lives in the same city as the seller so I contacted her husband to pick it up. A couple of Saturdays later we made or monthly trip to visit my grand daughter and loaded it up. When I got it home the close examination began. It really was a close cousin to my 1930's Delta 220 but no marks could be found. First ,off came that metal wrap around the pullies. Voila, a pulley cover. close to delta but not quite. Note the odd pointer and stop rod collar I then started disassembly, more to clear up some floor space them start the refurbishing. After all I already had two disassembled macines on the bench, one was the 15" General I picked up the week before. Decided to remove motor and as the switch box was taken off what should appear but this decal. I quick cleaning reveal the rest of the decal It's a Champion Blower and Forge from Lancaster PA. I would have never guessed. I know Champion made a lot of post drills but a check of the ones on the VM site showed nothing similar so maybe I got an uncommon machine after all. As I completed disassembly I decided I might as well start the restoration now. Afterall when you are already cleaning up two machines whats one more. My major concern was the Champion decal. As the machine had no other identification whatsoever, including no foundry casting numbers preserving this was necessary. In the end it proved impossible but a member from another forum sent me the artwork so I could make this one. Anyway , this is how it looks today. My 1936 delta DP220 stares across the shop as if seeing its own reflection
  22. Picked this up at an auction about a month ago. Believe it is from 1968. Although it was in decent shape I decided to give it the "treatment" Replaced all the bearings, new paint, and buffed up the shiny bits. Had a bit of a problem matching the old paint colour but after some advise I remembered I had some paint left over from my Poitrs jointer repaint. That on was a little too yellow so I had my wife darken it and she got a close match. All on all turned out pretty well As found Now My apologies for the size of the pics, my first post here.
  23. Version 1.0.0

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    Delta Mfg. Co. Catalog 1026 Drill Press Vise Decal Image (1940-41)
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