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Dan P

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Everything posted by Dan P

  1. @PeteM thank you for your input. To your point regarding 2D vs 3D, I certainly agree with you. I myself have a fair amount of CAD experience, as I do it often in the day job, so I can easily see the benefits of it and how common it is for engineers. I also agree with how CAD is becoming more commonplace with Sketchup and the like. I see more hobbyists utilizing this because they see the benefits of computer modeling before cutting wood. Here is the updated compilation list: FUNCTIONS [3D Functions] -Carving -Duplicating -Determine grain direction [2D Functions] -Interpret 2D drawings -Generate cut list -Determine grain direction [Measuring] -Length, width, thickness, parallelism, concentricity, flatness, etc. -Moisture content -Cupping [Drilling] -Pilot holes (hinges, drawer glides, etc.) [Turning] -Lathe operations [Routing] -Profiling (CNC with read out, speed control) [Surfacing] -Planing -Jointing -Sanding (range of grits; oscillating; spindle) [Cutting] -Rough cut -Final dimension -Angle cut (0 to 90 degrees) [Combining] -Gluing -Veneer [Finalizing] -Staining [Requirements mentioned:] -Change over between tools should be 5 minutes or less, without use of tools -Drilling functions to use 1/4”, 1/2” bits -Motors (more than one is highly likely) should be between 1 and 5 HP -Surfacing operations for up to 15” wide boards -Tool bit swapping capability -Measure wood moisture content (and use this to anticipate dimensional change) -Traditional joinery needs: mortise and tenon, dovetail, grooves (dado, rabbet) [NOTES:] Traditional joinery encompasses many aspects, like cutting, drilling, surfacing, etc. For these, I will categorize them by their primary function. I.e. mortise and tenon – tenon is a cutting operation, mortise is drilling. Can you guys describe a scenario of how you’d use a machine like this? As a very simple example, here is a very short scenario: After purchasing some rough-cut wood, I’d use this machine to 4-square various pieces to then cut joinery. I’d want to cut the joinery to create cabinet doors (cutting tongue and groove, mitres, etc.). Also, I’d likely want to try some engraving or carving to add decoration. I’d use a pattern previously created or design a new one to feed into the machine to carve out. I’d also want to replicate the process as I’m creating a number of doors. Finally, I’d take the cut pieces to then final assemble. You guys can get as creative as you feel, as details do help.
  2. For the purposes of my term project, no management occurs other than managing myself (interesting at times) to meet the deliverables I need to. In the real world however, as I explained the process which ultimately leads to a specification document, this document would be put on contract. The managing mostly comes into play once that contract is established to ensure that the terms are being met (on a technical level). You justify terms being met via testing, which is also an area that the engineer manages. It's a valid question you have but also one that is well towards the end of the overall effort. Before you get to the specification document and subsequent contract, TONS of work goes into defining the requirements. Might seem trivial for a small machine, but remember, the discipline came about to help create large scale products (think of military systems). Also, thank you for the mention @John Morris. There is a lot of truth in what you said. Just a point of clarity though, while my project is a theoretical exercise, in reality this process is anything but!
  3. Sorry all, not sure how to edit a post of mine as I wanted to keep the compilation towards the top. Either way, here is what I've compiled thus far: FUNCTIONS [3D Functions] -Carving -Duplicating [2D Functions] -Interpret 2D drawings -Generate cut list -Determine grain direction [Measuring] -Length, width, thickness, parallelism, concentricity, flatness, etc. [Drilling] -Pilot holes (hinges, drawer glides, etc.) [Turning] -Lathe operations [Routing] -Profiling (CNC with read out, speed control) [Surfacing] -Planing -Jointing -Sanding (range of grits; oscillating; spindle) [Cutting] -Rough cut -Final dimension -Angle cut (0 to 90 degrees) [Combining] -Gluing -Veneer [Finalizing] -Staining [Requirements mentioned:] -Change over between tools should be 5 minutes or less, without use of tools -Drilling functions to use 1/4”, 1/2” bits -Motors (more than one is highly likely) should be between 1 and 5 HP -Surfacing operations for up to 15” wide boards [Traditional Joinery for consideration:] -Mortise and tenon -Dovetail -Grooves (Dado, Rabbet) Traditional joinery encompasses many aspects, like cutting, drilling, surfacing, etc. For these, I will categorize them by their primary function. I.e. mortise and tenon – tenon is a cutting operation, mortise is drilling.
  4. Let me preface this by saying this is an academic exercise and no machine will actually be built. This may not be the answer you were expecting, but it depends. At this moment, the machine is nothing more than an initial concept I came up with on paper. The process has only begun in defining what the machine is to be ultimately (over the next few weeks). The process starts with gathering input and feedback from the user base. Based on this, what the machine should do becomes clear (functional aspect becomes defined). Only once the functional aspects are understood can components (hardware) be selected or designed to really create the machine. But, as I mentioned, we aren't at that point yet. So, to answer your question with another question, how would you like it to be different from existing CNC offerings? Do the existing CNC machines not do something you wish it did? What dislikes do you have regarding CNC machines? Often, knowing what users dislike about something is equally important as I can make sure to avoid those in the concept and ultimately, the design itself. If you could provide me model numbers of the machines you have in mind, they would be a great addition to my research.
  5. Fellow woodworkers, I am seeking your input and feedback for a new machine concept I am developing as my term project for my masters degree. As a brief background, in addition to my day normal job, I am in my last semester for my masters degree in systems engineering. For those unfamiliar with this discipline, it is one that develops a concept and specification document for a complex system to be built. The process by which this specification document is created is by generating requirements which are ultimately derived into a specification through the process. It is these requirements that are important, and they come from numerous discussions and input from users, like yourselves. As woodworking has been a passion and hobby of mine for 2 years now, I thought it best to use my interest to fulfill my term project needs. However, to do so, I request the input of any that are willing to participate in the development of this school project. Should you be willing, I ask that you monitor and contribute to this thread as I plan to use this as the means to discuss. I have generically named the project the "Woodworking Helper 1000", as the concept is to be a multi-function machine. While I know these machines are by no means something new, my concept is to incorporate a computer controlled aspect that has a user interface. It may sound complicated, but the aim is to develop this system for beginners to the craft, those wanting to improve their skill, or those seeking to automate aspects of their building process. To begin the process, here are some initial thoughts to consider: • As a multi-function machine, what functionality would you want? I.e. planer, jointer, saw, drilling. Etc. (Note, don't be concerned with the technical aspects/challenges of implementing as that is my job. Only consider the functionality it should have) • For the computer controlled aspect, what features of those functions would you want to be controlled? I.e. ability to select a thickness to be planed • What features should be incorporated into the user interface to cater to beginners and aid in teaching? What features would be beneficial for improving your skill with machinery? What automation features would be advantageous to have? I.e. 4-squaring a board Lastly, I look forward to hearing what you all have to say and generating some unique ideas. I will be checking this daily and provide periodic updates as I compile feedback, to share in the process with you all and keep the discussion going. Dan
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