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JIMMIEM

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About JIMMIEM

  • Rank
    Apprentice

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  • First Name
    Jim
  • My Location
    Weymouth, Massachusetts, USA
  • Gender
    Male
  • My skill level is
    You got me, you figure it out!
  • Favorite Quote
    It Is What It Is

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  1. I replaced the crank with a ratchet. As you can see I didn't really extend it. It's in just about the same position as the original. I can reach it by extending my arm either over or under the table. The height adjustment clamp is on one side of the shaft that supports the motor and the crank/ratchet is on the other side. As you can see the crank handle rotation is restricted by the new auxiliary table. The ratchet raises and lowers the table much quicker/easier than the crank did.
  2. The easiest solution that I saw used a socket and ratchet wrench. I figured I'd give it a try. The current crank is secured to the D shaped shaft with a set screw. I removed it and slid on a socket. I started to drill the socket for a set screw but it was really slow going. So I cut a small piece from a plastic card, set it on the flat side of the D shaft and slid on the socket. The plastic card provided the right amount of snugness to prevent the socket from free spinning or slipping on the D shaft. The ratchet raises and lowers the table very easily so I'm quitting while I'm ahead. The ratchet is a lot easier to use than the small crank that came with the drill press.
  3. @Dadio, A notch could be cut but it would be in the area of the fence pivot point. An easy idea I saw used a D shaped socket and ratchet wrench. My fence doesn't extend back as far as the table in your first picture that uses the drill so I have a little more room to work with. I installed hardwood rails on the bottom of the auxiliary table which center it on the metal table. It's a tight fit but slideable. Maybe just slide it forward when I need to raise/lower the table and then slide it back to drill. Hex bolts into threaded inserts to lock it in place. I just watched the video....interesting idea.
  4. Just realized that with the auxiliary table close to the column the table elevation handle hits the auxiliary table. I could pull the auxiliary table forward to give the handle the clearance it needs or I could rework the elevation handle. I've seen a few modifications to the elevation handle that will allow it to work with the auxiliary table up against the column. Suggestions?
  5. @CharlieL, I received the following in an email but did not see this in the post so I cut and pasted it here. My apologies if my post appeared to be asking for free details. I have the same Dust Collector and several years ago I made the Thien pre-separator using a 20 gallon trash can. It has worked very well. I was merely curious when you posted your pictures. Again, my apologies for not being more explicit about the reason for my post. Hi JIMMIEM, CharlieL has posted a comment on a topic, Delta 50-760 Dust Collector, 1&1/2 Hp With 2 Nd Stage Posted in Delta 50-760 Dust Collector, 1&1/2 Hp With 2 Nd Stage It is a metal can. I do not give out free details on how to build things that I came up with. I like to think that my skills and time are worth something.
  6. Happy Belated Birthday!!!!
  7. Good tip. We'll all get older. My wife had a stroke 4 years ago and a lot of her strength and dexterity has not returned so I have to start thinking about stuff like this.
  8. It's a good thing I looked up what a Brayer is before I went to the store to buy one because the store employee didn't know what a Brayer is either. At least I was able to describe what it looks like and is used for. Along the same lines....a few years ago I went into a crafts store to buy Bear Claw hangers. The store employee told me that if I wanted Bear Claws I should go to a bakery.
  9. I don't know which is the better choice. The 3M rep thought 90 was the better choice. As you had good success with the 77 maybe I'll just go with that. OR, I could use 77 on one side and 90 on the other side. Am I over thinking or what?
  10. I just picked up a 4" Brayer Roller. Thank you for the tip.
  11. Have you used the 77? If so, do you think it would ok to use for this application?
  12. @Gene Howe I'm using 3M 90. I have some 3M 77 and called 3M and asked if 77 would be OK for my application. 3M rep said that 3M 90 would be better. Your thoughts?
  13. I read an article on doing laminate work in colder temperatures and the author said it was a little different than in warmer temps and to practice to get the 'feel' for it. I hope the drying time isn't too long at 60 degrees. Question, where's the degree symbol?
  14. Thank You. I've practiced my alignment technique on a dry fit.....so naturally when I 'go live' I'll mess it up. I knew what a J Roller is but had never heard the term 'brayer'. Googled it and will pick one up.

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