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tomp

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About tomp

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  • First Name
    Tom
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    Maryland
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    Male
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    You got me, you figure it out!

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  1. Reminds me of a famous quote from a well-known cookbook giving the recipe for Rabbit Stew; first, catch your rabbit.......
  2. I've actually thought about this as I'm going to need a bunch of 5/8" dowels for my reworked clamp rack - see the attached photo. I have this idea, haven't tried it yet but I think it's going to work - start off with a piece of 2x4 and drill a 5/8" through hole near the end on the wide face. - on the bandsaw, split from the end to the hole and install a screw across the slot so it clamps the dowel - take a piece of 3/4" plywood (I think that will provide enough depth to clear the projection of the router bit) and drill a hole large enough to provide clearance for the router bit as travels around the dowel. Attach the plywood to the piece of 2x4 with that hole centered over the 5/8" dowel hole. - clamp that assembly in a vise so the hole is hanging over space. - insert the dowel in the 2x4 with the upper end flush with the top of the plywood and clamp with the screw. - Adjust the router so that the top of the radius on the cutter is flush with the bottom of the base. - set the router in the hole, start it up and traverse around the dowel. I've thought about this a lot, and don't see any reason why it wouldn't work, just not sure how clean of end it's going to cut with about 50% of the cut being against the grain. I wasn't going to cut a full dome though, thinking maybe a 1/8" or maybe a 1/4" radius so there would be a little flat in the center. As I said, going to need a bunch but it should be fairly quick - feed the piece of dowel up from the bottom until it hits a block you have sitting across the top of the plywood, tighten the screw to hold it in place and then cut the raius. I could make a sketch if needed, but I think my explanation is fairly clear.
  3. How about of these carbide discs for an angle grinder Carbide Wood Roughing Disc for Angle Grinder - looks as if it would make short work of knocking the bark off those slabs, and I wouldn't think that the dirt would bother it too much.
  4. How about the idea of cutting a rabbet in the back face of the face frame with the depth equal to the thickness of the glass. You can then make wooden retainer strips and screw to the back of the door or purchase some commercial retainer clips. I left the corners as shown and cut the corners of the plywood panel to suit, but you would have to square them up with a chisel to suit the pane of glass.
  5. How about this? Rough all the layers close to finished size. Use a pattern to finish the top layer and glue it to the next. On the router table, using a pattern bit registering on the finished layer, rout the next layer to finished size. Repeat until you have the required depth, registering the bearing on the bit to the previous layer, that way you don't need an extra long bit and avoid possible vibration. Using a spiral pattern bit, the finish should be pretty close, but finish up on the spindle sander. Glue the bottom on and finish the outside surfaces. Roughing out the layers close to finish size would allow for alignment errors when gluing up the layers, but you should be able to get it close enough that you only need minimal material removal to get to finished size.
  6. Certainly one way to cut a spline, hand position notwithstanding. However, a spline that tight in the slot will have all the glue scraped off when installing the spline in the slot. I guess you would have glue on the (narrow) bottom of the groove but there would be little to none on the flat faces.
  7. Never used the guard until fairly recently until installed a mini-split in the shop and realized that I needed to put dust collection on top of the table as well as underneath. I tried modifying the OEM guard by adding a nozzle, with limited success - I think I have it too far forward (towards me) and it would hang up on the material being cut. I spent the money for a Shark Guard and now try to use it whenever possible - can't use it for dadoes or other partial cuts such as grooving the edges of door rails and stiles for the internal panel - but it certainly helps keep the sawdust down. For those that are using a sled, why not consider a dust collector similar to that shown in the photo attached. The guard can be modified with the addition of strips of FastCap Saw Stache Sealing Strip to provide better dust control, and the complete guard could be hinged to allow for lining up the blade with the cut line. Here is the reply with the attachment - Sorry about that, the original is in .wdp format and I had a little trouble converting it to .pdf so that I could post. It was in color but I had to print (B&W printer) and then scan as .pdf.
  8. Never used the guard until fairly recently until installed a mini-split in the shop and realized that I needed to put dust collection on top of the table as well as underneath. I tried modifying the OEM guard by adding a nozzle, with limited success - I think I have it too far forward (towards me) and it would hang up on the material being cut. I spent the money for a Shark Guard and now try to use it whenever possible - can't use it for dadoes or other partial cuts such as grooving the edges of door rails and stiles for the internal panel - but it certainly helps keep the sawdust down. For those that are using a sled, why not consider a dust collector similar to that shown in the photo attached. The guard can be modified with the addition of strips of FastCap Saw Stache Sealing Strip to provide better dust control, and the complete guard could be hinged to allow for lining up the blade with the cut line.
  9. You can actually use them as a substitute for a dowel center if you don't have enough or are using an odd-size dowel (hard to find dowel centers larger than 1/2").
  10. When did you sneak in and take a photo of my shop? Could have at least tidied up a little while you were here...………….
  11. I made mine adjustable in height - a little higher than the table saw on the max, and low enough to sit on my favorite 5 gallon bucket at the low end. Bought an RV scissor jack from HF, works perfectly to raise and lower the table. The upper and lower frames are built with2x4's that were trimmed and squared, assembled with pocket screws and glue, and the upper legs are two strips of 3/4" ply, joined at 90° to wrap around the lower legs and slotted for the clamping bolts that hold it at the selected height. The top is two layers of 3/4" plywood, edged with poplar and covered with plastic laminate for easy clean-up - I've since added a Kreg base plate for a clamp at each end. I built the top with an overhang all round so I could clamp to the top if needed as I didn't want t-tracks in it.. And I added cabinets underneath to store all the little tools and supplies that need to be handy. It's on retractable casters (Rockler) as it gets moved from the end of the TS to the open space that becomes available when I put the Gold Wing outside. If I could do it again, and had more room, I'd make the top larger - limited to about 32" wide x 36" long - but I can always fall back on (2) sawhorses, (2) 2x4's and a piece of plywood if I really need a larger top. Because of the flexibility, the adjustable height was well worth the extra work involved.
  12. Tried these but found that they would pop off if the hook was tweaked when pulling the tool off the board. As my pegboard is either on doors or sliding panels where I had some access to the front and back, I would up using zip ties - bought in bulk at HF - and that solved the problem. The peg locks do work when initially setting up the panel until I've settled on how everything is arranged and then I switch to the zip ties - although you can always cut off the zip ties if you're making changes.
  13. I've thought about that but, to be honest, it's not that often any more that I need a bigger bench - and then I go back to the sawhorses. This cabinet was a little out of the ordinary, and turned out to be a mistake, If I'd thought about it a little more up-front, I would have made it in two pieces as it's just too big for me to handle by myself, particularly now that it's in the finishing stages and has to be handled a lot more carefully - 30" wide x 18" deep x 72" tall, too much for me any more. And an extra top is something that needs to be stored.................
  14. Gerald, For years, I worked off a pair of 2x4's on top of a pair of sawhorses with a piece of plywood on top of that. The goal when building the bench was to use that height as the minimum and the height of the saw table as a maximum, adjustable anywhere between those limits - and it's worked well so far. The only downside is that it really needs to be bigger, but I'm limited by needing to be able to move it between the table saw and my other bench. Most of the time it's being used at halfway between those extremes as that's what seems to work for me but it's nice to have it higher/lower when it needs to be.
  15. John, I don't set an anvil on the top and bang away, but it's been solid for any work that I've done on it so far. The lower section is made up from dressed 2x4 lumber, and the upper section is doubled 3/4" plywood on the same dressed 2x4 lumber, with the slotted "legs" made of 3/4" plywood joined into an angle with biscuits and screws. Even with the top raised to maximum (and with the casters retracted so that the legs are sitting on the floor, the assembly is rock solid and has held up to any hammering that I've done on it so far. As with any bench, if I'm doing any serious banging, I move the work so that it's over one of the legs. I installed threaded brass inserts into the lower legs and use two clamp knobs (with super-thick flat washers) at each leg, there has never been any indication of slipping or movement while I'm working on the bench.
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