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schnewj

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  1. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from HARO50 in Detail Sanding Tools ?   
    My thoughts exactly.
     
    If you strip the doors, then do a light sanding, then I suspect you will be where you need to be. You're going back with a much darker color which should help cover any imperfections in the stripping/sanding processes. If they used a penetrating stain, then it may be a lost cause, as you will never get the color out of the wood.
  2. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from HARO50 in another piece of hidden history   
    Heroes all! No telling how many lives these men saved, only to be ignored by those that were. Thanks Peter.
  3. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Cal in Apprentice Project   
    In all seriousness, he managed to get you started, and managed to get the lessons to stick.
     
    That is all you can hope for, that, whoever you are teaching pays attention and learns the lesson.
  4. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from FlGatorwood in What's On Your Work Bench?   
    That's an awful lot of pine...what's the planned use?
  5. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Cal in More pretties (concealment furniture, decor, and Murphy Bar)   
    @MaDeuce
     
    Hats comment got me to thinking. Some of your inventory takes up a lot of acreage on a wall. You might want to consider making a few scaled down versions (for example the flags) to see how they are received. People may be more willing to purchase a smaller version and fitting it into the existing decor instead of trying to figure out where to hang a bigger version.
  6. Haha
    schnewj reacted to p_toad in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I think i'm a hybrid.   Started out with a few hand tools, got a few power tools, and then more and more of each and have quite successfully found that a combination of either allows me to turn a perfectly good piece of wood into scrap in an instant.  
  7. Haha
    schnewj got a reaction from Cal in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    "...a router"! Ah, grasshopper, have you never heard the saying "you can never have too many clamps"? Well, having "a router" is like owning only one clamp.
  8. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Cal in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I think that it is an individual choice. Like Gene I am a hybrid woodworker. However, I lean more towards the traditionalist side of the discussion.
     
    I can reach for a hand tool and do an operation and get an end result. Sometimes quicker than setting up a machine and performing the operation. I don't mind using hand planes or chisels. Others may not be physically able or mentally inclined to do so...but guess what? I own a thickness planer and a jointer, also. I even have a shaper tucked into the corner if needed. Try and steal my table saw and you might leave in a horizontal position.
     
    As for CNC's, well, I'm a little on the controversial side. I see some beautiful and talented, imaginative, results from some people, but I don't personally consider a CNC real woodworking. Again, the traditionalist side. To each his own, if you can't carve, then CNC is the way to go.
     
    On the other hand, there are some great uses for a CNC; creating complex components, cutting circles, etc. I see CNC as creating a computer program, not making something with your hands. Just because you own a self driving car, doesn't mean you are a competent driver/operator. With all of that said, CNC are here, do have their place, and can be useful. I just don't see one in my shop anytime soon.
  9. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Dadio in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I think that it is an individual choice. Like Gene I am a hybrid woodworker. However, I lean more towards the traditionalist side of the discussion.
     
    I can reach for a hand tool and do an operation and get an end result. Sometimes quicker than setting up a machine and performing the operation. I don't mind using hand planes or chisels. Others may not be physically able or mentally inclined to do so...but guess what? I own a thickness planer and a jointer, also. I even have a shaper tucked into the corner if needed. Try and steal my table saw and you might leave in a horizontal position.
     
    As for CNC's, well, I'm a little on the controversial side. I see some beautiful and talented, imaginative, results from some people, but I don't personally consider a CNC real woodworking. Again, the traditionalist side. To each his own, if you can't carve, then CNC is the way to go.
     
    On the other hand, there are some great uses for a CNC; creating complex components, cutting circles, etc. I see CNC as creating a computer program, not making something with your hands. Just because you own a self driving car, doesn't mean you are a competent driver/operator. With all of that said, CNC are here, do have their place, and can be useful. I just don't see one in my shop anytime soon.
  10. Like
    schnewj reacted to Mijohnson1984 in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    Lol I told my wife that one day the walls will have nothing but clamps and planes still doesnt believe me. I actually have two ones out for repair. Silly silly triton can’t hold its depth. Looks at another one for trim work.  Well that or another drill probably the drill first. You know something Tim the tool man Taylor could approve of. Lol 
  11. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from FlGatorwood in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    "...a router"! Ah, grasshopper, have you never heard the saying "you can never have too many clamps"? Well, having "a router" is like owning only one clamp.
  12. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from FlGatorwood in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I think that it is an individual choice. Like Gene I am a hybrid woodworker. However, I lean more towards the traditionalist side of the discussion.
     
    I can reach for a hand tool and do an operation and get an end result. Sometimes quicker than setting up a machine and performing the operation. I don't mind using hand planes or chisels. Others may not be physically able or mentally inclined to do so...but guess what? I own a thickness planer and a jointer, also. I even have a shaper tucked into the corner if needed. Try and steal my table saw and you might leave in a horizontal position.
     
    As for CNC's, well, I'm a little on the controversial side. I see some beautiful and talented, imaginative, results from some people, but I don't personally consider a CNC real woodworking. Again, the traditionalist side. To each his own, if you can't carve, then CNC is the way to go.
     
    On the other hand, there are some great uses for a CNC; creating complex components, cutting circles, etc. I see CNC as creating a computer program, not making something with your hands. Just because you own a self driving car, doesn't mean you are a competent driver/operator. With all of that said, CNC are here, do have their place, and can be useful. I just don't see one in my shop anytime soon.
  13. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from FlGatorwood in More pretties (concealment furniture, decor, and Murphy Bar)   
    @MaDeuce
     
    Hats comment got me to thinking. Some of your inventory takes up a lot of acreage on a wall. You might want to consider making a few scaled down versions (for example the flags) to see how they are received. People may be more willing to purchase a smaller version and fitting it into the existing decor instead of trying to figure out where to hang a bigger version.
  14. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Woodbutcherbynight in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    "...a router"! Ah, grasshopper, have you never heard the saying "you can never have too many clamps"? Well, having "a router" is like owning only one clamp.
  15. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Woodbutcherbynight in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I think that it is an individual choice. Like Gene I am a hybrid woodworker. However, I lean more towards the traditionalist side of the discussion.
     
    I can reach for a hand tool and do an operation and get an end result. Sometimes quicker than setting up a machine and performing the operation. I don't mind using hand planes or chisels. Others may not be physically able or mentally inclined to do so...but guess what? I own a thickness planer and a jointer, also. I even have a shaper tucked into the corner if needed. Try and steal my table saw and you might leave in a horizontal position.
     
    As for CNC's, well, I'm a little on the controversial side. I see some beautiful and talented, imaginative, results from some people, but I don't personally consider a CNC real woodworking. Again, the traditionalist side. To each his own, if you can't carve, then CNC is the way to go.
     
    On the other hand, there are some great uses for a CNC; creating complex components, cutting circles, etc. I see CNC as creating a computer program, not making something with your hands. Just because you own a self driving car, doesn't mean you are a competent driver/operator. With all of that said, CNC are here, do have their place, and can be useful. I just don't see one in my shop anytime soon.
  16. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from p_toad in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    "...a router"! Ah, grasshopper, have you never heard the saying "you can never have too many clamps"? Well, having "a router" is like owning only one clamp.
  17. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from p_toad in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I think that it is an individual choice. Like Gene I am a hybrid woodworker. However, I lean more towards the traditionalist side of the discussion.
     
    I can reach for a hand tool and do an operation and get an end result. Sometimes quicker than setting up a machine and performing the operation. I don't mind using hand planes or chisels. Others may not be physically able or mentally inclined to do so...but guess what? I own a thickness planer and a jointer, also. I even have a shaper tucked into the corner if needed. Try and steal my table saw and you might leave in a horizontal position.
     
    As for CNC's, well, I'm a little on the controversial side. I see some beautiful and talented, imaginative, results from some people, but I don't personally consider a CNC real woodworking. Again, the traditionalist side. To each his own, if you can't carve, then CNC is the way to go.
     
    On the other hand, there are some great uses for a CNC; creating complex components, cutting circles, etc. I see CNC as creating a computer program, not making something with your hands. Just because you own a self driving car, doesn't mean you are a competent driver/operator. With all of that said, CNC are here, do have their place, and can be useful. I just don't see one in my shop anytime soon.
  18. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Artie in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    "...a router"! Ah, grasshopper, have you never heard the saying "you can never have too many clamps"? Well, having "a router" is like owning only one clamp.
  19. Like
    schnewj reacted to Mijohnson1984 in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I believe most are and will always be hybrids of the two sides. There are just some things you can’t do by hand like cutting exact repeatable circles and there’s other things that are better left to hand tools. Got to love my block plane when I’m rounding edges. With that being said I’m learning that I lean more towards a traditional approach but I’m not doing it for money and time isn’t a issue so much. So I’m not motivated to push work out with the quickness. To be honest I’m not even sure if I’d even call it a traditional approach even.  More of a I don’t have the tool for that how can I do it with a router, can’t do it with a router....well figured it and make it happen.
     
    On a side note I’m finding I really have a unhealthy obsession with my router and the lathe isn’t to far being it. 
  20. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from Mijohnson1984 in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    I think that it is an individual choice. Like Gene I am a hybrid woodworker. However, I lean more towards the traditionalist side of the discussion.
     
    I can reach for a hand tool and do an operation and get an end result. Sometimes quicker than setting up a machine and performing the operation. I don't mind using hand planes or chisels. Others may not be physically able or mentally inclined to do so...but guess what? I own a thickness planer and a jointer, also. I even have a shaper tucked into the corner if needed. Try and steal my table saw and you might leave in a horizontal position.
     
    As for CNC's, well, I'm a little on the controversial side. I see some beautiful and talented, imaginative, results from some people, but I don't personally consider a CNC real woodworking. Again, the traditionalist side. To each his own, if you can't carve, then CNC is the way to go.
     
    On the other hand, there are some great uses for a CNC; creating complex components, cutting circles, etc. I see CNC as creating a computer program, not making something with your hands. Just because you own a self driving car, doesn't mean you are a competent driver/operator. With all of that said, CNC are here, do have their place, and can be useful. I just don't see one in my shop anytime soon.
  21. Like
    schnewj reacted to Gene Howe in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    Most of us are hybrids. We use whatever gets us to the point we're aiming for. Be that with hand planes or powered planers, hand saws or table saws and band saws, carving knives or a Dremel. Many say the journey is 99% of the enjoyment. I agree but, I would rather ride than trudge. 
  22. Like
    schnewj reacted to Artie in Thoughts on the where woodworking is going   
    For anyone in the business of woodworking, it’s gotta be bottom line, what’s more profitable/better for business (or at least 90% of the people in business would think that way). For those not making their living at it, I would say it’s whatever gives you the most satisfaction, this of course would differ greatly between each of us. Only thing stopping me from having a CNC machine is money. Money to buy a place large enough to set one up, and money to pay for one, with all the trimmings. I don’t think for people in the non-professional side, there is a wrong answer. 
  23. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from p_toad in Wood lathe info   
    Good job! You might want to contact Curtis @Woodbutcherbynight. He has a teenager under his wing, who is really doing well, and might be able to offer some suggestions.
  24. Like
    schnewj got a reaction from p_toad in Wood lathe info   
    Uh, huh! ...an excellent sander...well imagine that...
     
    Seriously, great job on a first attempt.
  25. Haha
    schnewj got a reaction from p_toad in Grandpa Dave MIA   
    I hope he's repainting it. That butt ugly green has got to go!
     
    Hurry back, Gramps.
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