Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

DuckSoup

Members
  • Content Count

    914
  • Joined

  • Last visited

1 Follower

About DuckSoup

  • Rank
    Joiner
  • Birthday 09/22/1956

Profile

  • First Name
    Bob
  • My Location
    Campbell, Ohio
  • Gender
    Not Telling
  • My skill level is
    Advanced
  • Favorite Quote
    Next

Recent Profile Visitors

3,180 profile views
  1. Artie, my original post was in response to woodbutcher question: I did not see that he had quoted you and if by me replying to his post I offended you I appoligize. I gave in my reply experiences that I had encountered during my 34 years as an IBEW commerical electrician. I also spent 8 hours every 3 years in code classes. You & I both know that the AHJ always gets the last word. I have ask more than my fair share of questions here as well and was just offering what I could when I could. Again, if I offended you I apoligize.
  2. I think the idea here is to exercise the trip mechanism. The company provides the test button so I would believe this is an acceptable method.
  3. That's a great looking piece Irish. Question, it may be obvious but I'll ask, are you sealing the wood and then do the carving?
  4. Digital media isn't going to help in this situation.
  5. Its common to have nuisance trips with these devices when running motors. This is the reason they aren't used on receptacles that feed a refrigerator. I would try a standard receptacle.
  6. Paul that light is awesome & good to see you were able to use it.
  7. U.S. National Electrical Code NEC Article 110.3 (B) requires GFCI testing - excerpt: 110.3 Examination, Identification, Installation, and Use of Equipment (B) Installation and Use. Equipment must be installed and used in accordance with any instructions included in the listing or labeling requirements. Most manufacturers recommend that gfci receptacles be tested monthly as stated in the paper work included, but who really reads that. Some gfci's have a chip built into them and act like a one time fuse. If the plug has not been tested in over a year the chip recognizes that and the next time it is tripped or tested it won't reset. Like @Artie stated these companies can control their own demand & sales. Some state health care inspections require maintenance workers to keep logs that show the gfci's were tested according to manufactures recommendations. Osha can issue fines to companies for not doing the same. Square D put out a report a few years back and admitted that some of their breakers would not trip when left in the "on" position over a long period of time. They now recommend that the breakers be exercised, off/on, at least once a year. To me this makes sense because unless I need to turn a breaker off or it trips some can be in the same "on" position for years. I have gotten into the habit of turning all my breakers off & on when I change batteries in the smokes.
  8. Butter knife for a screwdriver, screwdriver for a chisel & chisel for a pry bar.
  9. Seems to me that I may have seen these or something similar in a baking facility. A row of these would be suspended above the conveyor belt that carried fresh baked hamburger buns heading to the cooling area and then to packing. When the pans dumped the buns on to the conveyor some would pile on top of each other and as the buns passed under the springs this was a way to keep them in a single layer. May not be the correct answer but they look familiar.
  10. They look great. Searched "shaker box stencils" & there are ton of ideas, maybe a sponge and a little color could up the price.
  11. Great to hear good news Jess. Both of those pieces are awesome, she does beautiful work.
  12. My guess would be some sort of tensioner similar to what's used on a reel to reel. Used to apply tension to a band or ribbon. The first photo shows a hole and the back of three studs. The hole would mount to a stud on a piece of equipment with nut & washer, based on the wear of the other studs. Two studs on the back hold the round dowels, threaded on the opposite end to accept the screws. The photo shows a third stud in the middle the I believe to be a rod. The flat plate on the top I believe is fixed to the back mounting plate maybe brazed on the inside. A 90 degree bracket with 2 rivets to hold it and threaded to accept the screw. If you would remove the three screws and pull the plate back with the handle this would allow access and then you could insert a band or ribbon over the dowels and under the rod. The spring would adjust the tension. The lack of wear on the spring has me thinking that nothing moves through this but is use with other parts that require the tension.
  13. My apprenticeship class had a guy that I was somewhat intimated by, smart & had all the right questions. When taking a test most of us were still filling in our name while he was turning in his completed test. A few years down the road I ended up working with him and all my concerns went away, he had five thumbs on both hands. He had the book smarts but had no idea how to convert that to his hands and be productive at it.
  14. I don't think there would be a difference between the two when your speaking of the "maker". I think the difference is in the application were the material would change for a commercial use. If building cabinets for a print shop the construction would be similar to kitchen cabinets but the material and hardware would change for hard use in a commercial setting. If you would call yourself a "furniture maker" I think or would hope that you could build any type of item that would be use as furniture. This would cover a wide range of construction knowledge from simple jewelry boxes to the frame of a couch or chair and knowing what types of joints & material would apply where. Anyone can build a chair with arms but knowing how to build it in a way that when someone uses the arms to help themselves get up they are strong enough to withstand the use. I think a "craftsman" is a broad term and can be use to describe any person that uses their hands to make something & does it well. Cement, dirt, thread, flour, wood, all materials used by a craftsman but each have their own title, mason, gardener, seamstress.....
×
×
  • Create New...