Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

kmealy

Members
  • Content Count

    2,726
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    4

Everything posted by kmealy

  1. Yes you do not want to build a film or it will be soft and sticky. In addition for ring porous woods like oak, it's helpful to come back in an hour or two (or both) and wipe again. The oil that gets into the pores can bubble out as it cures/off-gasses the solvent and leave a bunch of tiny blobs of finish.
  2. Just passing this along. For $150, it's probably worth having for any of its functions. I've seen the tail section built into a single frame that makes things easier, but takes more space. Photos available if interested. Be aware that I think it takes an 8" table saw blade only, FWIW. SHOPSMITH -10ER Made in the fifties. $150.00 All cast iron and steel. In good condition. Makes an EXCELLENT drill press by itself. The Shopsmith Factory still uses these as part of their assembly line. Has all parts for: Drill Press Table Saw Lathe 12" Disk Sander Horizontal Boring Plus Scroll Saw attachment Questions or interest, call or email Larry Saupe @ 513-658-1115 lesaupe@aol.com NOTE: This is not Larry's personal Shopsmith but one that is identical. He would never part with his. More about a 10ER
  3. Polyester is a different animal. I've only seen it on pianos, though not all pianos. The classic repair for furniture is a "burn in" repair where a resin stick is melted, dropped in, leveled and smoothed. You need to worry about color, transparency, grain, texture and sheen. That's why they pay us the big bucks. I had a guy watching me once and said he'd never caught the hang of it. I told him that it takes a few hundred times of practice (and even then every once in a while things throw you). He said he must be a slow learner because he'd been trying for 10 years and still couldn't do it.
  4. As others have said, it depends a lot of what you are thinking of making (and the space and budget available). Your needs will vary considerably if you are interested in pen turning vs. building kitchen cabinets or decks. Here is another opinion: If you know what to look for, getting used older equipment can be a good deal. Most of that stuff is very durable and available for half or less of what a new one would cost. For me, who builds furniture, boxes, picture frames, theater sets Top tier table saw - ripping, crosscutting, mitering, joinery jointer/planer (yes a machine with two sets of blades and tables) - getting rough wood smooth, edges straight, and keeping from making everything from 3/4" wood random orbit sander(s) - smoothing before finishing cordless hand drill - drilling holes and driving screws next tier router - edge profiling, plunge cutting miter saw - cross cutting or mitering narrower pieces corded drills - when I need higher speeds or more than one drill bit at a time, e.g., vix bit, countersink bit, pocket hole bit, etc. next tier Drill press - larger diameter holes, holes where perpendicular is important disk sander - smoothing convex surfaces band saw - detail cutting and curve cutting jig saw - curve cutting larger pieces spindle sander - smoothing concave surfaces belt sander - smoothing larger surfaces, finished joints, etc. plate joiner - joining engineered wood (plywood, MDF) brad nailers and staplers - joining rough projects, back panels, etc. pocket hole jig circular saw - rough cutting sheet goods to break down larger sheets impact driver - driving construction screws
  5. Was amused by this manufacturer's description, and the wonderful warranty. The Hitachi 303761 6-Inch High Speed Steel Jointer Planer Blade for the Hitachi P12RA Jointer is made with high speed steel. It cuts through a variety of materials and does not dull or wear. This blade is designed to withstand repeated use without shattering or bending. The high speed steel is exceptionally strong and reinforces the cutting edge of this blade. This product is especially designed for the Hitachi P12RA Jointer and comes in 1-pair set. This product is perfect for storing in your garage or storage shed for convenient replacement parts. The Hitachi 303761 6-Inch High Speed Steel Jointer Planer Blade for the Hitachi P12RA Jointer is warranted to the original purchaser to be free from defects in materials and workmanship for a period of 30-days from the original purchase date. Every Hitachi accessory is designed to the highest standards and is rigorously tested for both performance and durability.
  6. It appears that the confusion over oil finishes is not just limited to the US. Some good information in the article and the comments. I was SHOCKED at the price of this huckster's oil. I also got a laugh that it could be up to 100% naphtha (in which case you'd be buying paint thinner). https://paulsellers.com/2019/06/finishing-with-danish-oil/?pk_campaign=feed&pk_kwd=finishing-with-danish-oil https://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/finishing/oil-finishes-their-history-and-use/
  7. I got a call from the neighbor about a month ago, they had seen a coon climb my garden fence and slip into the shed attic. They lent me their live trap and after a couple of days caught one. Dispatched and tossed over the fence to the wildflower field to feed the turkey vultures. A couple days later, a second was trapped. Same result. A few more days and a possum met the same fate. That seemed to be the end until I saw a skunk coming around and slipping under the frame. I thought we were rid of it when one got hit on the road earlier this spring. A few days later and she was trapped. Then 4 kits appeared looking for her. The joys of country living. I think I'm temporarily free now. When the shed gets resided this summer, soffit will go up and hardware cloth buried around the perimeter.
  8. We used to live at the edge of the town where Webers were made -- I didn't know it at the time though. But have had two charcoal and two Weber gas grills. One of the charcoals we still have for camping and gave the old gas one to a daughter. We bought the last one from the local Do-It-Best hardware that was the largest distributor of them in town (even though a small store), and it came assembled and delivered. I used to go there frequently and one of the staff would be assembling one in the front of the store.
  9. “We don't make mistakes, just happy little accidents.” -Bob Ross
  10. I look back at some of my very early projects (and even later ones with which I've had difficulty) and have developed a motto: * do the best you can with your skill level today * learn something from your work * let your next one show your improved skill and * it's not a mistake, it's an opportunity for a design change And I have a poster in my shop to remind me: Skill is made, not born in us, and it advances best through difficulty. -- Charles Hayworth.
  11. kmealy

    Fire

    Not in my wheelhouse. I presume so. My daughter is on the board but she's currently on an Alaskan Cruise with the kids.
  12. kmealy

    Fire

    No, that was my other "job," the furniture bank. All is fine there except we're already out of room. If we need new space, it might actually be a good thing. The old space was long and narrow and work area was L-shaped. We had to be careful the order we built things in so that we still had room to work. That, and there was a lot of junk there. Hopefully the equipment -- mostly a table saw, a miter saw, a compressor and a bunch of hand tools can be saved or replaced with insurance money.
  13. kmealy

    Fire

    Last hour update: We are very lucky. The theater where the current (minimal) set is has said that we can keep the set on their stage for a couple weeks. We won’t know if we can get into the storage building until the inspector comes, which is Monday at the earliest. We have been there and have surprising little physical damage to our stuff, just the building itself and heavy smoke damage. The fire stopped literally at our loading dock door. The rest of the building is completely gone!! So until we know if they will let us go in and get all of our costumes and building materials and sets, (or if they condemn the building) we will be on hold. I guess we are looking for either short term or long term storage at this point, not sure. Unfortunately, everything except the platforms at the theater smell heavily of smoke and can’t be stored with other items.
  14. kmealy

    Fire

    Oh, and we're expecting 3-7+ inches of rain in the next 5 days.
  15. kmealy

    Fire

    Got a call today that the theater set shop where we do builds had a 4-alarm fire in an adjacent unit. That's where we store all our props, wood, tools, and set pieces. Won't be able to get in until Monday. Sunday is the final performance of the current production (already off-site) but we're going to be hurting for the fall show, that normally takes 10 weeks of Saturdays to get constructed. Thankfully no one was hurt. Here's our door:
  16. kmealy

    Fire

    Got a call today that the theater set shop where we do builds had a 4-alarm fire in an adjacent unit. That's where we store all our props, wood, tools, and set pieces. Won't be able to get in until Monday. Sunday is the final performance of the current production (already off-site) but we're going to be hurting for the fall show, that normally takes 10 weeks of Saturdays to get constructed. Thankfully no one was hurt. Here's our door:
  17. Let's say on the lid that the left side the cross cleat is 1" from the end and on the right, it's 1/2" To lock it you slide it to the right and each end of the lid is 1/2" under the box end. To unlock it you slide it 1/2" to the left and the right end will lift up. Both cross cleats run over the side boards to hold the lid from falling in. Dimensions are up to you but I think mine are 12" h x 12" wide and 24" long (or whatever wood you have around or tools you have to tote). Google Japanese Tool Box and you'll find a bunch of articles on it. One was in FWW by Toshido Odate (sp?) You can get fancy and make proud box end joints and use "luxury" nails if you wish. I just used some 6d box nails.
  18. I've taught several classes in this and made over 150 of them. Boxes, baskets, trays, etc. Let me know if you have any questions. One thing I learned the hard way: My middle daughter graduated from Sycamore High School. I was going to make 10 or 12 of them out of quarter-sawn sycamore (wonderfully flecked wood) for her and her best friends. Sycamore doesn't bend for anything. I think I got one side done without it exploding. So the tops only were sycamore. I suggest you start with a #2 size -- they are large enough to not have severe bending and small enough to handle easily.
  19. A friend is making some Japanese tool boxes for his grandkids (I did a show and tell of these at the May club meeting). I suggested he use wood 1/2-5/8" thick to keep them from getting two heavy. I also suggested the following method that I've used before to get good wood. I buy 2x10 or 2x12 Southern Yellow Pine (SYP) meant for joists. It is relatively knot free. And if you get some with the pith down the middle you can saw out an inch or so and get perfect quarter-sawn lumber. Then you re-saw and you get wood just a fraction less than 3/4" that you plane down to desire dimension. Over time SYP gets as hard as oak. He came over yesterday and we planed down the sawn and factory surfaces. He's edge-gluing them today and I think they'll look great when done. If you've never seen one, they are pretty neat. The top slides one way to open and the other to close securely. Then end cleats make handles.
  20. There's an app for that
  21. Northern Kentucky https://www.cincinnati.com/story/news/2019/05/24/ark-encounter-owners-sue-over-rain-damage/1220627001/?fbclid=IwAR0-o-TGicUqi6tMRntWNZu2i3uL1zhX91lyIlZzxg64AP2VYQ5vvmKDjL0
×
×
  • Create New...