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John Wright

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About John Wright

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    member
  • Birthday 09/01/1945

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  • First Name
    John
  • My Location
    Omaha, NE USA
  • Gender
    Male
  • My skill level is
    Intermediate

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  1. Grandpadave, Ok, took some photos today. Here they are. This is the axle assembly on top and the bicycle bearings below. Notice the "swedge" type shoulder on the axel and the swedge type fitting that slides on the axel. Here is the outer bearing on the axel assemble. Note the "cup" arrangement the bearing sits in. The swedge then presses against the bearings. There is a caution in the owner manual to use caution not to over tighten the nut that puts tension on the wheel/bearing assemble. It should only be tightened enough to prevent side to side slip. I think what happened is it was over tightened and the wheel was torqued off the race as a result. Here's the swedge assemble inserted into the bearing. Note the dust cover on top of the bearing. This fits on the wheel and over the bearing. Hope this helps you vision how things go together.
  2. That would be an option. Have had some suggestions from OWWM as well. One was to epoxy the race in position. The thoughts over there are that the race is too hard to drill and rivet. However, I just stripped all the paint off the lower wheel and found rivets in the outer rim. So makes me wonder what the inside of the wheel must look like. If it is rivited on the outer rim, is it possible that the interior piece is one solid piece and somehow it has sheared off hence the rotation? Without destroying the wheel no way to know. So I am on several tracks right now. Try the rivet approach and see if the metal is soft enough for this approach. Second the epoxy using jb weld or something similar like loctite. The problem with both approaches as you said would be to get everything centered to the outer rim to prevent runout or wobble. We are thinking a circular wedge kind of thing that we can slide between the outer shell and the inner race to keep things centered. Of course the obvious solution is to find a new wheel. I will continue to search of that as time goes on. I found the saw, will probably find the wheel.
  3. I graduated from the USAF Academy in 1967. I was an AF Pilot for 22 years, flying F-4D's from Homestead AFB in Florida and Kunsan AFB ROK. I also flew OV-10s in Vietnam and the last airplane I flew was the B-52. I spent 4 years at HQ SAC and retired in 1989. I served at Homestead AFB FLA, Kunsan AFB Korea, NKP RTAFB in Thailand, Pleiku AFB Vietnam, Quang Tri AFB Vietnam, and DaNang AFB Vietnam. I served at Griffiss AFB Rome NY, after Vietnam. In 1975 I went back to Grad School and then on to the USAF Academy where I tought Aeronautical Engineering for 4 years. In 1981 i was transfered to Wurtsmith AFB Michigan where I really began my wood working hobby. I had a huge lumber mill just up the road and could get all kinds of rough cut lumber for pennies a foot. In 1984 I was transfered to Offutt AFB and HQ SAC where I stayed until my retirement in 1989. I am disabled due to Agent Orange exposure in Vietnam.
  4. Ahh, now I understand the confusion. The shaft does not rotate. The wheel rotates on the shaft which is attached to the tension blade tension device. So the race contains the bearings. The race is stationary to the wheel and the bearings rotate on the shaft. Like the front wheel of a bicycle.
  5. I took the lower wheel off. Its pretty flimsey construction. The wheel is in two pieces. See photo below. The tire wasn't glued on so it just came off revealing the two part wheel. My thought is the outer tin shells were somehow pressed on the race. Through the years the bearing wore out and froze on the shaft. The wheel then kept turning breaking the tin/race seal. My thoughts now are to try and braze them together or maybe rivit the shells to the race somehow. I have a friend who is a machinist, I will take this over tomorrow to get his thoughts on how to fix it. Here's the lower wheel race. By the way, the lower shaft is not original. The original shaft was one diameter all the way through. Mine has been turned down. The original used bicycle bearings, mine has regular ball bearings, so my thought is that there has been a mod much like Larry did on his 785 a few years ago. Here's the shaft. Here's the lower wheel. This is the side toward the body of the saw. So we shall see what my friend says tomorrow.
  6. What are you thinking. Replace the race with a bearing, or would Precision carry races too?
  7. So you are both thinking the race is a press fit into the wheel? The factory manual doesn't indicate that, but hey, what's new. Its obvious that its useless as is, so maybe pulling it apart will answer some questions. Think I'll poke around for parts, maybe over on owwm. I'm thinking the race will not be available, so may have to have one made, or do like Larry/John Buskirk did and use a different wheel all together. This 785 seems to be pretty rare so finding parts may be a real problem.
  8. Ok, I am attaching photos of the reverse side of the wheel. The inner race will not come out. I have included a video of the inner race rotating inside the outer tin wheel if that helps at all. 2016-11-04 08.53.20.mov
  9. Gene, Another SAC Warrier? Love the restore, well done!
  10. I recently found a pretty nice (at least I thought it was) Delta 785 10" Bandsaw. Got it home and took a closer look. Missing the upper blade guard assemble which I found over on OWWM. Removed the upper wheel due to awful sounds from bearings (I thought it was bearings). Bearings are bicycle type so I am rebuilding them, but that's not the problem. The wheel seems broken??? By that I mean the outer tin shell rotates on the bearing housing. I don't think its supposed to do that. You can see the problem in the photo. The bearing housing is not connected to the wheel. Soo, any ideas on how to repair that problem?
  11. Sorry I haven't been here in a while. We decided to buy recycled bead board from our local dealer. Found enough to do the job and some left over. It really came out better than I had thought. Thanks for everyones help and advice. John
  12. Yes, I saw that. Great base. but we are going with salvaged boards. However, after I spent three hours with our contractor jack hammering out the cement floor, we found the reason for the "spongy" floor in hallway. Seems the under layment which is 1 X 8 ship lapped lumber is short of the joice. So I have to replace that. No problem, easy enough to reproduce, but I cannot find the oak flooring any place. Its 1/4 thick by 2" wide oak I can find all kinds of 2 1/4 wide oak, but 2" seems to be unavailable. So does anyone know where I can find this older flooring. Or, I could cut down the 2 1/4 boards to 2" and then add the groove. Problem is how to add the groove? Any ideas on that? Pretty thin for a table saw, and I haven't found any router bits that thin. Old houses are great, until you run into some of these kinds of issues.
  13. Ok, Went to our local salvage store and they have exactly what we need and it's vintage so it's good in two ways. First we recycle which is great, and second, it keeps things as original as possible. So I think that's the way we are going to go. Thanks to everyone for the advice. Who knows, I may use it to make some period built in.
  14. That seems to be what most of my web queries say too. Any ideas where to get a molding cutter for beadboard? Maybe Rockler?
  15. We are in the process of remodeling our bathroom. Our home is over 100 years old so we are going back to original look. Claw foot tub, free standing sink etc. We want to put beadboard on the walls probably about 60". Maybe a little shorter. Problem is finding the beadboard at a reasonable price. Everything we find is $7 a piece for 3" wide pieces. Soo, I have a shop full of tools, why not make it myself. Any ideas on the best approach. I was thinking router or molding cutter for TS,but I'm open to any ideas, I do have a Delta LD shaper if I could find the right heads. Thanks for any thoughts/ideas.
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