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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/16/2016 in all areas

  1. 7 points
    I work part-time at a local garden center, and am often asked to make something for a store display. These items have to be reasonably cheap, look good, and last at least for the length of time the display is up. IF they survive a year in storage, they may be re-used next year. This time it was a fireplace for the Christmas season. A few knotty pine boards, some left-over flooring from our kitchen, and a couple of pieces of plywood, and we have this! The structure around it was a project from about six years ago, and is a permanent fixture. John
  2. 7 points
    My first project for the store.... Christmas 2006. One of the girls at the store did the paint job. Two sheets of 3/4" plywood and a piece of pine (seat front) from an old bunk bed. John
  3. 5 points
    Joeb41

    Competition range case

    I made some progress on my range pistol box this weekend. The carcase is made from 1/4" and 1/2" Baltic birch. The finish is clear lacquer on the inside and Rustoleum hammer finish on the outside. The UHMW strips are for the gun tray to slide into. The cover will be attached with piano hinge. I made the box as a solid box then cut the lid away. These are the fingers that will lock the guns into place for transport. They slide on the two runners and a 1/4" threaded rod will act as the clamp. The tray is complete. The dado in the side will slide onto the UHMW strips in the box, very smooth. I had thought of using mechanical slides but I am trying to keep the weight down. I hope to have it completed by Thursday and will post some photo of the finished box. Thanks for looking.
  4. 4 points
    carpet got installed this week and furniture moved in. Awaiting some artwork for the walls and then it's done.
  5. 3 points
    Stick486

    When I buy a tool;

    you liked that one... this should make you feel spastic all over...
  6. 2 points
    Since my brother and his wife retired, they are spending more time experimenting with various cuisines. I though I'd get them a micro-plane/grater for the kitchen. Rather than just buy the completed item, I ordered the planer/grater and made the handle. In the past, I sent them various kitchen/serving utensils so this handle would reflect the previous designs. The biggest disappointment, with this particular grater, was that the handle was designed to be permanently attached to the grater using epoxy. In my opinion, handles should be detachable so that the metal portions can be adequately cleaned without damaging the handle. Fortunately, the threads on the grater were standard 3/8 x 16 so creating a better solution was pretty easy. I started with a piece of maple, squared into a turning blank. Then drilled the end of the blank to accept a 3/8 x 16 brass threaded insert- this will allow the grater to removed and placed into the dish washer. The insert was installed on the drill press using a shop made bottle stopper mandrel. The insert can be seen in this photo- The handle blank was then prepared to receive contrasting walnut inserts. The insert slots were cut on the table saw using a simple angle jig to hold the blank in the proper orientation. The blank is cut four times, using a single pass thru the blade. The depth of the cut is arbitrary but between 1/4 and 1/3 the thickness of the blank produces a nice pattern. The inserts are glued into the saw kerfs. the inserts are 1/8" thick and just long enough to extend past the end of the kerfs at either end. Once the glue dries, the inserts are trimmed to be flush with the blank sides. I trimmed these on the band saw. They don't have to be perfect. Trimming just makes the turning process a little easier. Now it's just a matter of turning the handle. I used the bottle stopper mandrel and a Jacobs chuck to mount the blank in the head stock. The inserts create a "twist" pattern as the blank is rounded Shaped the blank Finished with a bunch of layers of wipe on poly And the grater screwed into the handle Now I need to make something for my Mom.
  7. 2 points
    steven newman

    Cherry Box of Squares,lid work

    Ok, time for the "late Edition", Went back down to shop for a bit....had a little more work I could do.. Yeah,,, ugly things. We have ways of flattening this out.. Called a Jumbo Jack plane. Jack plane on steroids. The weight will help keep the board down onto the bench. Have to do both faces, and even a few smooth plane passes... Until I get these four slats, fairly straight, and smooth.....enough to at least work with them. But, there are those edges.. Back to the Jumbo Jack. Make one side straight, and then gingerly flip the sammich over, and do the other edges. Without any of them moving around...mallet comes in very handy.. Testing the fits... Have to allow for joinery on the ends. Longer sides were ok for length, had to trim the shorter two a bit......Stack all the mess up into one spot.. Have a few more jobs to do with this mess...dovetailed corners, a Stanley #45 to plough a groove for the panel, size the panel and raise it, Might take a day or three..."Say Goodnight, Gracie"
  8. 2 points
    Stick486

    When I buy a tool;

    groan....
  9. 2 points
    Chips N Dust

    When I buy a tool;

    How much shop can a shop vac suck if a shop vac sucks shop
  10. 2 points
    Smallpatch

    Something I mentioned some time ago

    And once they try something, that's it. They are stuck with that product and brag on it and never even think there might be something out there better, but no, their mind is made up.... This is the last drift I got from the old timers. Well, someone not a turner, is trying to change our minds, heavens to murg- a- -troids I don't hardly ever turn, except substantially in bed, but when I do I don't like to see cracks that might screw up a good piece of wood I cut down then what ever I dabbed on the ends of the logs that didn't do the job it was put there to do. So stick your ear up here close and listen while I write down Aleene's tacky original glue, in the brown bottle I might add. It will only cost you numbskulls about two bucks to check me out...... I cut down this plumb tree some time ago, maybe four years ago ,maybe longer, and I can still stick a finger nail into this glue for it is still pliable. Aleene's was originally built for this reason, no it was not, it was originally built for craft making. This is probably the reason for the reasonable price tag. If it was included in you know whoses woodworking supplies we would see quite an increase in funds to get some to our garages... I just yesterday cut off some limbs and was out of the Aleene's glue so I thought I better dab something on the stubs for this hunk of wood might sit in the lathe for a month or two before I get around to it. I know, limbs , don't normally crack as does the ends. I heard that from a turner..
  11. 2 points
    I love my aircraft carrier sized bench for general everyday work. 48" x 84" top. Two layers of 3/4" MDF topped with 1/4" Masonite that can be swapped out when it gets too beat. It also serves as my out feed for table saw. The entire cabinet it sits on is closed storage with 4 doors.
  12. 2 points
    steven newman

    Cherry Box of Squares,lid work

    Did a little bit this morning, before errands get ran... I usually don't like to do tails first, because when I then do the pins... I forget which side of the lines to saw on, leading to something like this.. Not really that bad. Second corner, I remembered which side to run the saw on.....tighter joints.. I can fill those gaps with sawdust and glue. Second corner is mallet driven together. Went to Lunch, will leave the other two joints for when I come back after errands are ran. Will do pins first on those corners. Need to get these done, and dry fitted up...THEN I can size the raised panel and start on it. Need to dig out the Stanley45 and set up for 1/4" x 1/4" grooves. Panel will need some place to sit, after all....
  13. 1 point
    Cal

    Kitchen Micro Plane For My Brother and Sister-In-Law

    That is really nice Lew. Thanks for posting the "how-to". Cal
  14. 1 point
    WOW that came out good. I always wondered how all those store displays got built. good job, great paint job too. Herb
  15. 1 point
  16. 1 point
    I absolutely LOVE to repurpose old stuff that seems to be just laying around the house. Good job
  17. 1 point
    Very Nice and Creative
  18. 1 point
    HandyDan

    When I buy a tool;

    It is good if it sucks and sucks if it don't suck.
  19. 1 point
    HARO50

    When I buy a tool;

    If a vacuum really sucks, is that good or bad? John
  20. 1 point
    Cliff

    Dust Control Remote DIY

    Well it took me several starts and stops, but I not have a remote On/Off switch at each of my work stations they work flawlessly and I'm happy. My DC is complete.
  21. 1 point
    Stick486

    Coveralls

    that's a good plan...
  22. 1 point
    Ron Altier

    Ergonomic crochet hook replacemetn

    A couple of years ago, I made my wife a set of 12 ergonomically designed crochet hooks. Then I made a rack for them. She will never use them all but she wanted all of them. Long story short, she misplaced 2 of her favorites. That is where she says "Can you make me two more?" As luck would have it, I had two spare ( less than perfect) handles. I was able to salvage one today, will try the other tomorrow. They were all made of exotic wood scraps.
  23. 1 point
    Ron Altier

    Ergonomic crochet hook replacemetn

    The design actually does reduces stress, it is easy to hold on to with a bulb there rather than to grip a small metal shaft. I first made up a couple made of pine that I kept altering to fit her small hands. When she felt good about the design, I made a good one
  24. 1 point
    I can see why she likes them. Let's her create her art with your art. Steve
  25. 1 point
    HandyDan

    Something I mentioned some time ago

    Good idea Jess. I have been using wood glue for a while as end grain sealer. I got a case of out of date wood glue given to me and it has worked wonders as a sealer. Usually I have to apply two coats as it soaks into the end grain. Haven't lost anything to a crack yet.

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