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Richard Inlow -
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"Back From The Archives:1897423278_OldManSmiley:"

 

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I picked up this machine last week along with some other machinery and I have not been able to figure out what it originally was. I was told that it came off of a military vessel (probably a "victory" ship) and I suspect it has been modified to add the drill chuck. The motor has a plate on it identifying the manufacturer as the American Electrical Tool Company (1 HP, 440 volt, 3 Ph) but there is nothing to tell me what the machine originally was. There is also a small plate which appears to be a military plate stating "Battle Creek . . . M-5038 . . . div". As you can see from the photos, the machine has a single spindle and a foot brake, leading me to believe it was something other than a grinder. However, the American Electrical Tool Company only made grinders and polishers to my knowledge so I'm questioning whether that is correct. Any help in identifying this would be appreciated.

 

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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Richard, I suspect that this was a special order machine for the military.

I noticed the word Grinder X X X ed over.

The single ended shaft, and what appears to be closed end cover tells me that it is probably original.

Without seeing more of the machine, I suspect it may have originally been a disc sander.

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Really neat looking machine Richard. I am sure someone here will help you out. Larry seems to already be on top of it.

 

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I thought it was probably a disk sander too, Larry, but when I researched the company it appeared that they only made grinders and polishers. I saw the x'd out "grinder" on the tag and wondered if that was done by the manufacturer or by the person who put the Jacobs chuck on the machine. I don't know that I've ever run across a grinder that had a brake pedal on it and I can't imagine why anyone would make a single spindle grinder, so I've got to think it was originally something else - like a disk sander. I was just hoping someone would recognize the stand configuration (which is fairly unique and appears to be all original) and that would lead me to a definite answer.

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Quite possibly it's original use was as a disk sander. The way it is now configured, It could be a horizontal borer. But there would need to be some ways that would be capable of being set at different elevations below the bit.

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Richard, After viewing this photo, I still think it was probably a disk sander.

 

 

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I believe the original guard would have mounted on the machined area on the end bell behind the Jacobs type chuck.

Until more information (catalogs/photos) of the company surface it's hard to determine what machines they manufactured.

There is also the possibility that the machine was only made special order for the military, and therefore would not appear in any catalog.

I've ran across a few Delta machines in my area (S.E. WI) that did not appear in their catalogs. (At least not as equipped)

My best guess/speculation with these machines is that they were sent out for evaluation to shops/companys contracted by Delta as product testers, but have no way of confirming this. The machines I've mentioned were all in a lumber yard that also had a cabinet shop. The lumber yard closed in the 1940's and the machines have been in the basement of one of the co-owners of the lumber-yards house since.

A friend of mine is the Grandson of the co-owner, the house is now his parents.

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IMG_0464_zps5ee1fc9f.jpg

 

OK, it appears this machine has clearly been altered from its original configuration so . . . here's a possible plan that I would like some feedback on. When I picked up the machine shown above I also picked up this grinder. It came off the same ship and was also manufactured by the US Electrical Tool Company. I've take both motors apart and it appears they have many common parts. In addition, the main bodies (center part holding the stators) are identical so it appears the end housings are interchangeable. The unidentified machine (the "Drill") has a high speed winding (3450) and the grinder has a slow speed winding (1750). So, not knowing much about electric motors, I'm now wondering if I can cobble the two machines together to make one machine.

 

Specifically, I would like to keep the stand, brake mechanism, and brake housing from the Drill and replace the remaining components with parts from the grinder so, at the end of the day, I am left with a two spindle grinder, slow speed, on an original stand with a foot brake. To make this happen it appears that I would have to remove the brake drum from the Drill spindle and add it to the spindle in the grinder (both spindles appear to be the same diameter) and then mount the grinder body on the stand using the brake housing (which will mount to the grinder body) on the left side and the grinder housing on the right side. I would be using the grinder's original stator and rotor so we know that they would be compatible. This seems like it would work but I just don't know enough to say for certain. Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Richard

 

 

 

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Richard,

If the shaft lengths are the same, I don't see any problem in doing what you're proposing to do.

 

Since you have them apart see if the end bell assembly's are the same width from where they mount to the center section to bell end where the shaft exits.

 

 

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"Back From The Archives:1897423278_OldManSmiley:"

Edited by Larry Buskirk

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