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Anyone ever used Shaper Origin?


KevTN

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The only time you use Shaper Tape is when you are doing large projects that won’t fit on the workstation. I have two workstations and several pieces of plywood covered in tape. Those are reusable. You can print your own  and they seem to work fine. I did a few on the printer but these days I just use the tape. It’s $18.00 a roll. In three years I have gone through about 10 rolls. I started out making my own workstation and i still use it as my main platform. My wife bought me the SO Workstation last year and it is very well built but not worth the money. There are multiple plans available on the SO site that have the cut files so it’s very easy to build your own. 
Paul

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  • 1 month later...

Paul, your posts have me thinking about an SO. I'm considering getting a CNC this year and I have to admit the SO looks like an interesting approach. After seeing some of your stuff I've watched a few Utube videos (something I never do) to see how they (the SO) work. Very clever invention, and thanks for the stuff you've done. I may still get a gantry type CNC, but assuming I can learn to use it, an SO might be a good step up for larger stuff.

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1 hour ago, Fred W. Hargis Jr said:

Paul, your posts have me thinking about an SO. I'm considering getting a CNC this year and I have to admit the SO looks like an interesting approach. After seeing some of your stuff I've watched a few Utube videos (something I never do) to see how they (the SO) work. Very clever invention, and thanks for the stuff you've done. I may still get a gantry type CNC, but assuming I can learn to use it, an SO might be a good step up for larger stuff.

Fred it is a really cool piece of equipment! One shop I stopped at demo’d it for me and then another guy came and I stuck around listening. If it could do 3D I would buy one next week. 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I vote for the CNC.  Get a used one if $$ is an issue.  There are several coming out on the market now.  I'm going to be selling my Probotix Nebula since I bought another Avid Pro.  I need the space and the time/effort to build it.  Get as much machine as you can, and then up it a step.  There's a lot of truth to the "get your second machine first" rule.

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I'll second, or maybe third the vote for getting a CNC instead of the S.O..  Even a small 24x24 one can be doing work while you do something else.  The S.O. requires you to be the X and Y axis motors while it takes care of Z.  I like the open frame of what Probotix sells as it is easy to jig them up for joinery, angled cuts, mounting/hanging assembled furniture beneath to cut a details on, etc..   I started with a simpler CNC Shark and that handled all the flat and 3D work on the bed.  It wasn't until I bought the Probotix Meteor and realized the potential of accessing all the space below the frame that the impossible became possible. 5 axis cuts on the 3 axis CNC

4D   

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On 2/10/2023 at 2:02 PM, Fred W. Hargis Jr said:

Paul, your posts have me thinking about an SO. I'm considering getting a CNC this year and I have to admit the SO looks like an interesting approach. After seeing some of your stuff I've watched a few Utube videos (something I never do) to see how they (the SO) work. Very clever invention, and thanks for the stuff you've done. I may still get a gantry type CNC, but assuming I can learn to use it, an SO might be a good step up for larger stuff.

Gee Fred.  You're not that far from me.  A Probotix Nebula (30 x 50 bed) complete ready to go for the same price (or less) as the SO.  Hmmmmm

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Probotix machines come with a dedicated computer and  controller.  It's Linux based -  easy to use.   Tell him 4D.  All you do is make your file with whatever software you'll use (I use Vectric), set the post processor (just click a box), download the file to a thumbdrive, plug it in to the CNC computer, and start whatever cut you want.  I make all my files using my office desktop PC and then transfer them via thumbdrive.  This way I have 2 copies in case something goes wrong with one of them.  You will build up a collection very quickly and can reuse them as well as change them to fit other projects.  Even us old curmudgens can get the hang of it.

Edited by honesttjohn
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1 hour ago, Fred W. Hargis Jr said:

Where I keep getting tripped up on CNC is the need for a Windows computer....we are a Mac household, and I'm not sure I want a Windows computer. I'm kicking around just trying a used laptop and use it, but I still struggle with a Mac...I'd be hopeless with Windows.

I understand your pain.... Having had to suffer all these years using Macs.  ;)

I have no idea what software is out there for creating CNC files using a Mac.  Surely there must be some.  As John said Probotix CNCs come with a PC already set up to control the CNC, running Linux and LinuxCNC to open toolpath files you created elsewhere.  One program, in a graphic  mouse-based OS that works like Windows or OSwhatever on the Mac side.  Double click on the program to run it.    If interested in a Probotix CNC you can contact them for advice on what Mac software to use.   

4D

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