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First Bowl = FAILURE

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So I began carving out and hollowing my bowl.  Everything went fine of course.  Even tried out my new tool rests which fit perfectly.  How ever the deeper into the project I get the more the chisels want to catch on the sides.  So I decided to make it a bit shallower.  In the end it didn't even really turn out the way I really wanted it to.  How ever I still finished it off.  But I guess I'll try again soon LOL.  Not sure if I want to continue with bowls or try something else with turning not sure at this point.  But in my own opinion I think this first go was a failure.

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Not bad. You know segmented is not usually a beginners project so good start.

The deal with catches when hollowing is usually in the fact that you cannot see the orientation for the tool and cannot align the cutter. You could try making a mark at the center top of the tool with it oriented to cut. Then if it goes north ( or clockwise) too much you know to adjust. When hollowing with carbides start with the tool at about 45% down and gradually reduce that angle, but never less than about 10 . Above that is a very good chance at that catch. This shows the advantage of using round bar hollowers as the tool just rotates when catch occurs.

 

Even more fun is a hollowing rig but I am sure you will be asking soon.

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I’m still debating on whether or not to spend them money on easy wood chisels.  With the savanna chisels I’m honestly not liking the grips.  I couldn’t help myself lol.  I got myself a set of the easy wood chisels.  At least when they get here I’ll be able to do a comparison on them.

Edited by AndrewB
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I have never turned so I have no advice on the subject. I am however in the crowd that needs to make every mistake possible to learn LOL. Some can read a book, watch a YouTube video, and then know exactly what they are doing. I need to keep muddling and making mistakes before I gain the knowledge on how to accomplish something. To quote Thomas Alva Edison (loosely) “ I did not fail, I learned one way not to get the end result I wanted” (something like that, you get the point) One of the lessons I HAVE learned is-while first starting a new undertaking, do it on cheaper/less expensive materials until competency has been obtained. You have also given those of us who have not turned but are contemplating it, ideas about some of the obstacles/learning curves involved. I, for one, would be interested in following along with your journey in turning. Thank you.

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Don't feel bad, Larry.  I have a set of Great Necks, I think.  They are old and I have to sharpen after each turning, but I have grown to know how to use them and make them work for me.  Folks and I are all amazed at the results.  I turned some finials for a house next door and everyone there marveled at what I did.  So did I.  But, the feeling is very comfortable.  I don't know if my health will hold long enough to warrant another set of chisels.  :D

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