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Wednesday's Wisdom For Woodturners June 3, 2020

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@lew it’s a decent lathe it is variable speed.  Only about 400 bucks in cost.  On the lower end for lathes on variable speed.  Especially for budget... so far I’m enjoying.  Draw back is it’s only a 12 by 18 so you’d have to buy the bench extension for the lathe. I plan on doing that eventually.  Just picked up a jaw chuck for it as well should be here tomorrow.  Would I recommend it for noobs like myself.  Price and ease of set up yes.  Basically a plug and play lathe.  Make sure yo7 clean the grease off the bench when you get it and put paste wax on it.  Other than that it’s a good budget buy.

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Lew nice post. Like the jig Mike made but the older one is my fav. Too much trouble to cut a round in the new one. The old one costs nothing and will make life easier. I have a longer V jig That I used when making a stool..

 

The grain in the elm looks great

 

Almost forgot this. there are several turners doing these independent IRDs including Trent Bosch, Lyle Jamieson, and several others. Fee is mostly $10. Check the websites of your favorites to see if they are doing it. Also one more thing AAW is going to have a Virtual Symposium with a fee for $20.22 for the three days. See announcement: AAW Virtual Symposium

Edited by Gerald
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Thanks, Lew.  I enjoyed Mike as usual.  And, I liked Yoder.  He's always a hoot.  

 

The other day when I started cleaning up the pen blanks, I had misplaced my trimming bit, so had to go get another one which came in a kit for a nice price tag of $40+.  I set it up for the grandson and he loved cleaning up the ends.  And, he loved band sawing the blanks.  There will be a separate thread for that.  I learned some stuff from the videos especially from Mike making a jig to band saw round objects.  I have tried free-handing and it is dangerous.  Than you, @lew.

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So the Savannah Carbide tip tools I recently purchased was definitely a good buy especially if you can't afford the Easy Wood Cutting tools.  I would recommends buying all three at once the square cutter the round and diamond tip.  Either way they are extremely sharp simple to use and very robust.  I spent maybe a good 4 to 5 hours yesterday turning a square rectangle spindle into a round using mainly the round tipped carbide tool.  Worked great it just little rally hogged off material better than the HSS tools.  How ever I do have a good set of HSS tools on the way which I do plan on using when I eventually get into doing finer detail work.  The last bit of walnut I have I do plan on turning into a bowl using the carbides.  They run right around 200 bucks off amazon I am including the taxes in that cost.  If you can afford the easy wood tools I would just get those but if you can't afford them I would go this route.

 

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01GQIYUZA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

Link for replacement carbide tips as well...

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NF4B413/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

So would I recommend these tools for a beginner at beginner costs with a low budget, yes.  Hopefully I'll be able to go further in depth further down the road.

 

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2 hours ago, AndrewB said:

So the Savannah Carbide tip tools I recently purchased was definitely a good buy especially if you can't afford the Easy Wood Cutting tools.  I would recommends buying all three at once the square cutter the round and diamond tip.  Either way they are extremely sharp simple to use and very robust.  I spent maybe a good 4 to 5 hours yesterday turning a square rectangle spindle into a round using mainly the round tipped carbide tool.  Worked great it just little rally hogged off material better than the HSS tools.  How ever I do have a good set of HSS tools on the way which I do plan on using when I eventually get into doing finer detail work. 

 

Andrew HSS will remove more material faster than carbide. Advantages for carbide are in the hollowing process. The thing most turners do not try to understand is that frequent sharpening and proper technique will deliver a superior finish as compared to any carbide tool and yes that means even the premier Hunter tools I use .

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Yea I kind of figured that, from what I saaw the carbide removed quite a bit of material in a short amount of time.  How ever  I do plan on using both carbide and HSS tools swapping back and forth of course in the long run which should hopefully yield better results with better cuts.  I'm comfortable with getting the cutting angles with the HSS tools though how ever I just needed to order a better set of HSS tools rather than the cheap amazon 25 dollar set I originally ordered.  But the main plan is using both sets of tools to accomplish what I want to accomplish.

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3 hours ago, Gerald said:

Andrew HSS will remove more material faster than carbide. Advantages for carbide are in the hollowing process. The thing most turners do not try to understand is that frequent sharpening and proper technique will deliver a superior finish as compared to any carbide tool and yes that means even the premier Hunter tools I use .

That's why I also had pre ordered a good set of HSS tools which are on the way.

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6 hours ago, AndrewB said:

That's why I also had pre ordered a good set of HSS tools which are on the way.

What @Gerald said is very true.  While I do like the carbide tips I still keep all my lathe tools sharp and ready to go.  My HSS are inexpensive ones as well.  Turned 1000 or more pens with them and they are still with me today.  In Iraq I had to make something that required turning.  Sharpened a heavy duty screwdriver and used a drill for a lathe.  Worked but certainly not my best work.  We made do with what we had available.  :o

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Lew, I also have memories of my grandfather doing things like that.  I learned from him by observing, but I got better at straightening nails than him.  He did not like it, but often would tell me to straighten that nail.  And, he could then drive it.  I have his brace and bent bit.  I hope to make a box for it this summer.  We'll see.  The first time I remember seeing him use it was to replace a mail box that a driver had knocked off the post.  He drilled a new hole in 1952 and put the board back on top and then nailed on the mailbox.  Thanks, Lew, for all you do.  

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9 hours ago, FlGatorwood said:

Lew, I also have memories of my grandfather doing things like that.  I learned from him by observing, but I got better at straightening nails than him.  He did not like it, but often would tell me to straighten that nail.  And, he could then drive it.  I have his brace and bent bit.  I hope to make a box for it this summer.  We'll see.  The first time I remember seeing him use it was to replace a mail box that a driver had knocked off the post.  He drilled a new hole in 1952 and put the board back on top and then nailed on the mailbox.  Thanks, Lew, for all you do.  

@FlGatorwood Thanks!

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