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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

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17 hours ago, Cal said:

That is sure a fine cut.  From the pic of the saw blade, it has a 1 1/4" arbor.  Can you pick up a new blade locally, or is SS or online your only source?

@Cal, my experience has been if I have a saw blade with a small bore for the 1.25" bore, some folks who do the sharpening can also ream out the bore.  In addition, you can order arbors from Shopsmith with a 5/8" bore which will fit most sawblades. 

 

@Fred W. Hargis Jr  you are right that the Shopsmith tables are smaller than cabinet saw tables.  However, the model 510 and 520 have much larger tables and makes it much easier to make a normal cut.  If you have to cut at an angle, you run into problems, but it can be done.  

Edited by FlGatorwood

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On 4/27/2020 at 12:54 PM, Gene Howe said:

I've always used the "adapters" or arbors, as Shopsmith calls them. Don't know why, though. Many blade manufacturers will sell blades to fit the Smith without the arbor. 

I know why! With the adaptor you can use any blade on the SS and most other table saws without an adaptor. But if you get a blade holed out for a SS, you lose the ability to use the blade on an other than SS table saw. However for you and me there is only the SS!

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42 minutes ago, Artie said:

I know why! With the adaptor you can use any blade on the SS and most other table saws without an adaptor. But if you get a blade holed out for a SS, you lose the ability to use the blade on an other than SS table saw. However for you and me there is only the SS!

I'm quite happy with the Shopsmith blades and large arbors, I see no reason to modify or switch it up.

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2 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

I misunderstood. I thought you were saying you used the blades with the large hole. Sorry, my mistake.

Now I'm confused, I do use the large hole blades. I thought you were saying the same by keeping blades with arbors setup. But I think you are using 5/8th arbor adaptor right? With your blades all setup ready to go.

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1 hour ago, John Morris said:

Now I'm confused, I do use the large hole blades. I thought you were saying the same by keeping blades with arbors setup. But I think you are using 5/8th arbor adaptor right? With your blades all setup ready to go.

Yep. 5/8th arbor hole blades with the adapters. I don't even know where my SS arbor wrench went to. Just the hex wrench. Got me a couple with red plastic coated handles. Like these. Easy on the hands.51OSNEek2UL._AC_.jpg.16e65ba0aa826973eff0f0ef58bc6df9.jpg

 

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One advantage to the 1 1/4” bore on the blade is that the 1 1/4” bore arbor positions the blade closer to the end of the quill which minimizes any runout that might exist in the quill. Most of the blade manufacturers will bore the blade to 1 1/4”.

Paul

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All my blades are 10" with the 1.25" arbors.  I like those arbors.  Until I get my shelf storage rack built, I use the automobile wiring casing to cover the teeth of my blades.  I also use that on my handsaws to protect the teeth.  

 

My blades are Shopsmith and Craftsman Kromedge.  Really good blades to me.  And, I still have one small tooth plywood blade.  I simply keep it clean with ammonia bath every year.  Very little gunk on the blade.  

 

I have looked around and can find no one who sharpens blades.  The last man I used was named Helms in Texas.  

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Sorry for coming in late on this one but if you are worried about the tearout first check the usual culprits. Blade sharpening is important but also check the blade alignment to the fence. The other factor in a SS is whether there is runout on the arbor which will give the same effect as a bent blade. SS's are prone to this. Most of the time its caused by a catch while turning a large piece of work. Fortunately replacing the arbor is very easy takes about five minutes. When I am making a cut on ply that really matters such as expensive veneers or a crosscut on birch veneer I will blue tape it which either minimizes tear out  or completely eliminates it. Its cheap insurance.

Paul

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