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nevinc

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12 hours ago, nevinc said:

As for linking them together, reminds me of the old timey sawmills that ran on water power down by the creek 😊👍🏻

Here's another, BTW the benches for these setups are roughly 18" wide at the top.

They could be powered by a gas motor for those without electric power.

There were quite a few combinations possible.

Of course these are smaller machines, from the 1930's :OldManSmiley:

1685868811_DeltaWorkshopNo_652.PNG.1fd4c531e859ebfb59375e8865edc8d9.PNG

12 hours ago, nevinc said:

I am beginning to seriously reconsider the flip flop idea.

You also have to consider which machines will allow you to do this.

Some machines have oil in them that will leak out when turned upside down. 

I was trying to find a bench I saw awhile back that rotated the machines on shelves that kept them upright, but can't find it.

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15 minutes ago, Larry Buskirk said:

Here's another, BTW the benches for these setups are roughly 18" wide at the top.

They could be powered by a gas motor for those without electric power.

There were quite a few combinations possible.

Of course these are smaller machines, from the 1930's :OldManSmiley:

1685868811_DeltaWorkshopNo_652.PNG.1fd4c531e859ebfb59375e8865edc8d9.PNG

You also have to consider which machines will allow you to do this.

Some machines have oil in them that will leak out when turned upside down. 

I was trying to find a bench I saw awhile back that rotated the machines on shelves that kept them upright, but can't find it.

I hadn't thought of the oils, I don't think any of mine has any in them.  All electrical, if any of them have sliding parts it could be an issue.  So many different ideas, maybe I will just end up putting them all on the floor and low crawling from one to the other!  LOL..

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One thing I try to keep in mind is the "shop triangle" that I've adapted to the "kitchen triangle."

 

Find the 3 or 4 tools (one may be your workbench) that you use most and arrange them close to each other as such:

  • No leg of the triangle should be less than 4 feet (1.2 m) or more than 9 feet (2.7 m).
  • The sum of all three sides of the triangle should be between 13 feet (4.0 m) and 26 feet (7.9 m).
  • Obstacles should not intersect any leg of the triangle by more than 12 inches (30 cm).
  • If possible, there should be no major traffic flow through the triangle.
  • A full-height obstacle, such as a tall cabinet, should not come between any two points of the triangle.

For example, my table saw (most used tool) and jointer-planer sit next to each other, on one side is my Danish workbench and across from it is my assembly area.  Here's my new assembly table, in progress.  The other workbench is on the right edge and the table saw is at the bottom edge.
2019_10100003.JPG.751bd3c67613553a6302dca188e2b05b.JPG

Now, there may be more than one "work triangle" -- {stock prep and joinery}, {edge gluing}, {drilling, sanding, and routing}, {fine detailing, attaching hardware (hinges, drawer glides, casters, glass)}  etc.

 

If you are "sharing" the space with vehicles, keeping everything mobile is almost mandatory.  As is if you have a small shop and need to move stuff in and out as you need it.  In my prior shop(s), I had to rotate my table saw if I was doing a long rip vs. a long crosscut.

I do not have any experience with flip tops or putting table top machines flush with the surface, but started out with a Shopsmith and yes, grew weary of changeovers and would often make an extra piece of something so that if a problem happened down the line, I did not have to do the set up and calibration all over again.  There is an advantage to leaving a machine set up for the last operation in case you need to use it again (e.g, the drill bit or router bit in, the right blade or dado set up in the table saw, the miter saw or table saw set up with angles. depths, or stops needed)

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I completely agree that keeping things mobile is important as this is shared with my wife's car. (My RAM gets to sit out in the old, LOL)  I have plenty of room to move things around as I need them.

 

Very good point you also make is arranging them in such a way to make them functional and in some sort of order that is relevant.

 

I think I am going to stay away from the flip flop table and just use my second one for my band saw, grinder, drill press, and sander.  Since I have the first workbench to use for actually working on, I can use the second and mount my tools to it.  It will be 4X8' and have the same build as the other with wheels.

 

Thanks for the input and great things to keep in mind as I move forward.

 

Dr. Nevin

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This is the shelving syatem I refred to in another post.5f4814929ac8384e9aedc43235d960b8.jpg

 

It is a WOOD magazine plan but you can get the plan at Woodcraft:https://www.woodcraft.com/products/bench-tool-system-downloadable-plan?via=573621f669702d06760016d9,57892a5e69702d6b76000087

 

Found this on Pinterest and you might look there for other images

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