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So as I use my shop more and more I find myself using the Dewalt DWS779 sliding compound miter saw more and more for cutting my wood down to finished sizes. A prime example is while building the workshop stands and needing to cut the maple boards to finished length. What is questionable is the quality of cut the blade is giving. What is a good blade to use that's reasonable in price and quality to use on this 12" saw? I've been looking at a zero clearance plate for this saw as well to help. Suggestions?

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I'll recommend a blade, but I'd start with criteria first. Generally speaking, any blade with a less aggressive hook angle will cut more smoothly than one that has the aggressive 15˚-20˚. They also cut more slowly...which i guess is why a lot of folks don't like them. If you want glass smooth cuts, go with a negative hook angle, like the Freud LU91 (my recommendation). Notice the one I linked doesn't have the hideous red coating that's so prominent on most Freud blades. But other manufacturers also make versions of this, and i had a Ridge Carbide blade with a 2˚ hook that really cut quite smooth. The one I linked may or may not be reasonable, I don't buy 12" blades so have no idea what they cost.

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Just a couple tips as well, I have used these two methods with great success, first off if you are experiencing heavy tear out on the underside of the board, you may try slowing your push down considerably.

My other great wonderful tip that I have used for decades, is to make a scoring cut first about a 1/4" deep on the top with your saw then complete your cut with a second pass, the scoring cut really only takes 1.5 seconds so it's not any slower of a process.

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i use a three cut approach.

first cut has the teeth going DOWN into the wood and i cut about a 1/4 inch down into the wood.

 

second cut is short of the bottom, not all the way through.

 

third cut starts all the way to the front of your piece,  way deep so the teeth are actually cutting UP into the bottom of the wood face.

 

you CAN get blades that have a inordinate amount of teeth but it still will come down to having the teeth cutting INTO the surface of the wood that will prevent blowout.

 

One other thought is to find a 12 inch black and decker piranha blade, which would be worth its weight in gold as they don't make them anymore and can only be found once in a purple moon.

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I have used Dragon's approach which works great until I have to cut an angle and then I get confused.  So my way is to use a thin piece of plywood on the bottom of my target wood or a piece of masonite to act as a ZTC.  Any tear out is minimal as the plywood or masonite acts as the bottom of the board.  

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On 9/5/2019 at 5:57 PM, DRAGON1 said:

find a 12 inch black and decker piranha blade

I've been using the 10" blades on my table saw for years and they DO have a fantastic clean cut.   When i found them at Big Lots/Odd Lots years ago I purchased several.   Always good to have spare(s).  :)

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On 9/5/2019 at 6:36 AM, Fred W. Hargis Jr said:

I'll recommend a blade, but I'd start with criteria first. Generally speaking, any blade with a less aggressive hook angle will cut more smoothly than one that has the aggressive 15˚-20˚. They also cut more slowly...which i guess is why a lot of folks don't like them. If you want glass smooth cuts, go with a negative hook angle, like the Freud LU91 (my recommendation). Notice the one I linked doesn't have the hideous red coating that's so prominent on most Freud blades. But other manufacturers also make versions of this, and i had a Ridge Carbide blade with a 2˚ hook that really cut quite smooth. The one I linked may or may not be reasonable, I don't buy 12" blades so have no idea what they cost.

That blade I bought just after getting the saw. Maybe it's my cutting method, I'll have to try John's suggestion,  and the lack of any zero clearance tape/plate , thanks Gene. Ordered the tape, we'll see. Thanks guys.

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I use a DW708 to make the angled tops on my poker tables. I use the factory blade as well. I believe it is a DW3126 12" 60 tooth . These blades cut excellent  when new.. I used $120 blades and get just as good results with the DW Blade.I buy the blades new but do not sharpen them...IMG_0173.JPG.8ac2eb99cc7956c2c2bbbe6bf9ee669e.JPGchiptray4a.jpg.c16e410be82325d5041168aab471e03e.jpgfin1a.jpg.eae1c8ab6420585b506249ebd42ddaad.jpg

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@BillyJack Well if that's not proof that factory blades work, than nothing is! I know I've said it before, I'll say it again, exquisite, absolutely exquisite. Got a question, how many of these table were built before the perfection we see now, came to be?

Thanks for posting.

 

Edit: You don't sharpen those blades, does that mean they have a shop life till dull, then disposed of?

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The checkered flag table was my first table and the cherry table[yin yang] was the second.A guy on the East coast bought the checkered flag[racing] table.a guy here in KC bought the cherry.

 

I spent 20 years as a cabinet maker at this  and wanted to prove to myself I could and did..

 

After 30 years as a cabinet maker I took my personal photos of these tables to a furniture maker position opening in KC and had the job in 5 minutes...

 

As far as the DW blade I use till dull and recycle into deck use...DSC00011.JPG.ecc683a95113bc0c0dee84ff62a5a9d6.JPGIMG_0404.thumb.JPG.c9d33d9b11fef34e7eb358c4091edbe7.JPG

Edited by BillyJack

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2 hours ago, BillyJack said:

As far as the DW blade I use till dull and recycle into deck use...

Now that's a great idea, heard of folks in the trades doing something like that but I forgot all about it, something I think I'll adapt into my own flow of work.

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