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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

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I have watched some professionals on YouTube and noticed that they are cutting sharp crevices with the skew.  Instead of using the heal as I've always done, it appears that they are using the toe.  That appears to be a great opportunity for a serious catch.  What do I need to know to proceed with using the toe to round off beads and make the crevices?  How serious an accident can I have from trying this?  Should I attempt this without a spotter?  I am really anxious to your comments and input.  Thank you in advance for responding to these questions.

 

 

 

Edited by FlGatorwood
added video

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How ever one uses a skew a catch is imminent at all times.  I use them but they are not on my favorite tools list.  I have never injured myself because of a catch but keeping same spare pairs of underwear nearby would be a good idea.  A catch can scare the crap out of you.  Here is a good video on catches.

 

 

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There is a turner on YouTube- Brian Havens- who is excellent at explaining the technical aspects of the use of turning tools. Here is a link to his channel-

https://www.youtube.com/user/BHavensWoodworker/videos

 

This video talks about using the toe of the skew for cuts-

 

 For me, if I have to use the skew, I use the heel. It's how I learned and feel comfortable.

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I love the skew and the results it gives.  But, like Lew, I learned to use the heal and start away from the edge.  I can always turn the chisel over and do the end that I did not get in previous cuts.  

 

Thank you to you gents.  I have learned the reinforcement of riding the bevel.  I now realize how I broke a bowl because I put the tip of the chisel in the bottom side.  Pieces of beautiful cherry went flying about 8 feet away and I had a chunk of wood missing, causing the Shopsmith to run like a flat tire.  Now, I know.  

 

WBB, I totally understand as my heart beat hard and furiously while watching a couple of these.  I think I'll stick with what I feel comfortable with.  

 

Thank you, everyone.  I know what works for one may not work for everyone.  

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1 hour ago, FlGatorwood said:

I think I'll stick with what I feel comfortable with. 

Yeah I am by no means a expert turner.  I know enough to go slow, and stick with what I know.  It is a great tool to have in one's arsenal to deal with various builds.

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13 hours ago, RustyFN said:

Skew chisels are bad juju. I have tried one a few times with bad results.

Took me a long time to be able to use it and I still get a catch now and then. I mostly only use it for tapers and cylinders.

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23 hours ago, FlGatorwood said:

Thank you to you gents.  I have learned the reinforcement of riding the bevel.  I now realize how I broke a bowl because I put the tip of the chisel in the bottom side.  Pieces of beautiful cherry went flying about 8 feet away and I had a chunk of wood missing, causing the Shopsmith to run like a flat tire.  Now, I know.  

 

 

Hope this does not mean you used a skew on a bowl as that is indeed a very bad way to go. Sorry I did not watch your video before I posted as I was short on time , OK we are all short on time the way the world is going.

 

Shew is an excellent tool for spindles and pens and saves lots of sanding. You can even get a good enough surface to skip sanding with just a little practice. I thinks it is Raffan who says to practice daily with a 2 x 3 spindle stock for first 30 minutes in the shop to learn the skew.

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I prefer a skew that is ground straight across the end

 

image.png.7875341b4fa8db05753bf3736098b58a.png

 

I have skews with the angled grind too and use it at times but prefer the other.

 

image.png.96dc4998b02e814ac23a4b2c86740d54.png

 

I have a round one and an oval one but haven't found them to be any better than the others.

 

 

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I don't care for the oval skew as it is hard to sharpen and get inconsistent results. My favorite is a Thompson 3/4 sharpened in rounded fashion. Learned the grind from Mike Peace but here is a video by Brian Havens on various grinds.

Skew Grinds (shapes)

 

At about 7 minutes into this Mile shows how to do the grind.

The Devils Can Opener part 3

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