Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

Dear folks, help us raise funding for our community directly. And in the process you'll have a chance to win some terrific tools donated by our sponsors!  Read More...

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

I guess I'm a table saw guy, as I could never justify the cost of a track saw when it can't do many things (like joinery, non flat and wide shapes) that a table saw can do with ease and repeat ability.  And I only use my circular saw a few times a year to rough cut out plywood sheets.

But I see there's a new kid on the block.   Not enough to make me spring for one, though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Working with rough lumber, as well as plywood, my track saw sees a lot of use. I made mine and, it serves me well. With a good blade, my cuts are glue ready. I couldn't ever justify spending what Bosch sells theirs for. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Woodbutcherbynight said:

Yeah that $600 price is kinda killing my vibe.  But I bet money I can make my own....:ChinScratch:

Hey, an 8' length of good 3/4 plywood, a t track and a short insert attached to your saw's sole plate, and you're good to go. Well, ya gotta plow a groove for the track. Made one for the Skil 77 at 8 ' and, a couple short ones for cross cuts. Then a couple for the Skil 5.25 saw. Heck, who needs a jointer?

Edited by Gene Howe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have an idea for a project were the legs taper in width from top to bottom, made of two pieces mitered along the edge to form an "L". To verify the design, I cut two pieces (well, three really, need to remember that I need a right and left, duh) out of some scrap plywood. I cut two blanks to length and width and laid out the taper on one edge. Set the track saw to 45°, set the splinter strip on the rail on the pencil line and ripped the bevel. Not the cleanest job in the world, but close enough to prove the concept. I used the Domino to cut mortises in the edges and did a trial assembly. Surprisingly, the parts fit pretty well, proving the concept will work. For the real version - using some mahogany that I've been hoarding for 30+ years. I think the parts will be cut on the TS - it will take three fixtures; one to cut the taper on the blanks so that they are identical, and one with a RH and LH recess to rough cut the bevel along the edge. The bevel will be finished up on the router table.

 

While I used the track saw primarily to verify the concept, I think that it would be possible - maybe a different blade to cut down on the burning, and better fixturing of the parts while cutting - to make the finished parts with just the track saw, but I'm going to play it safe and use my TS. But I think it shows that the parts could be made with just the track saw, a little more care and definitely more skill.

IMG_5244.JPG

IMG_5241.JPG

IMG_5243.JPG

IMG_5240.JPG

IMG_5245.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Woodbutcherbynight said:

What is the width of the cut?

The way the saw table is pictured will handle over a 4' wide panel. The circular saw mounts to the metal plate that rides in the tracks, and can be turned 90° to do rip cuts. When doing rip cuts you have to feed the material like using a TS.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At my age, I don't need a track saw.  Some years ago in Shop or Wood or Woodworkers Journal, they had a plan to make a saw guide for a regular saw.  Use 1/4" sheet of plywood, adhere a small strip of wood along one length edge.  Ensure that the guide strip is straight.  Place your plywood on top of a few 2 X 4 pieces to ensure it remains flat on the floor or driveway.  Put the toe of the saw plate against the straight edge, start the saw and plunge it down and finish to the other end.  You now have a saw guide that fits your saw.  Bore a hole in one end so you can hang your guide.  You're done.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, FlGatorwood said:

At my age, I don't need a track saw.  Some years ago in Shop or Wood or Woodworkers Journal, they had a plan to make a saw guide for a regular saw.  Use 1/4" sheet of plywood, adhere a small strip of wood along one length edge.  Ensure that the guide strip is straight.  Place your plywood on top of a few 2 X 4 pieces to ensure it remains flat on the floor or driveway.  Put the toe of the saw plate against the straight edge, start the saw and plunge it down and finish to the other end.  You now have a saw guide that fits your saw.  Bore a hole in one end so you can hang your guide.  You're done.  

Yep that is my track saw

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...