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Artie

Storage Shed Plans/ideas

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Hi, my mother-in-law has a storage shed on her property. It’s about 27 years old, neighbors tree fell on shed, roof no longer rain tight. Shed was an cheapie, did a great job lasting this long. Doors are sagging/rotting, roof has moss growing on it, particle board has become fall-aparticle-board. So I’m trying to find out whether it’s more cost advisable to buy a new, already made one(probably not), buy a precut kit, and assemble (maybe, but quality could still be an issue), or just get a set of plans build it myself, well with some help of course (I’m thinking this is the most inexpensive, and fun, but also most work). To price out the build it myself, I need plans. Due to my MIL’s yard/driveway layout, we’re looking for a shed that is 8 feet X 12 feet. We need the door to be one the 8 foot end, and maybe a window or two for light. I found a set of plans that do this, but the rafters, joists, etc seem to be 24 inches on center, I think for strength and snow loads up here in NE I’m wanting 16 inches on center. So any recommendations for where I can get good plans would be greatly appreciated. Thank you for any help or suggestions, Artie PS I have checked the laws/rules/regulations and no permit is required for sheds 120 sq feet or less.    

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Building a 8x12 shed with 16 inch centers is straightforward.  You know the length and width, height should be 8 feet.  Being you guys have snow a stepper pitched roof would be a good idea, say 6-7 inches per foot.  Windows can be made simple, find  24x30 window and buy that, build the opening to fit.  The door can be a 36 inch wide standard single, or you could do French doors.  Depends on what you keep inside.  Making them is not difficult 2x4's doors are simple to make.   I have two 32 inch wide doors on my 8x10 but NO windows. 

 

Power if accessible is always a BIG plus, as you are an electrician I will skip that part.  :JawDrop:

 

I would build roof trusses on the ground and raise up, you will need couple people to pull this off.  

 

For foundation you can pour a slab, or just elevate the structure on 4x4 or 6x6 posts.  You build the walls on the floor and raise up when they are ready.

 

Plans, well you have the length, width and height.  A basic drawing on paper is sufficient for this job.   

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I agree with the Wood Butcher.  A shed this size is pretty straightforward to build when you keep everything on 16” centers.  One thing to consider, 5hough.  In Indiana a shed isn’t taxable if it is “portable”.  Therefore, most folks don’t pour a foundation but rather build them on a pair of 4x4 or 4x6 runners.

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Don't know if they still do, but Lowes used to print out plans for stuff like this and include a bill of materials with it...

If you do this yourself, you might also have to buy a tool or two...:D

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When you build a shed, it's never big enough. I'd build it 10' x 12'- max without a permit and only 2 extra sheets of sheathing. 24" wall stud spacing will work fine. Set it on a crush stone base with 4 x 4 treated runners. T1-11 exterior sheathing and corrugated asphalt roof panels. Just my 2¢

Edited by lew

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5 minutes ago, lew said:

corrugated asphalt roof panels

I had to google that one, I had no idea they even existed. Are they made out of asphalt Lew?

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The way my MIL’s property is laid out, the shed is on the opposite side of the driveway from the house. The current shed is 8x10, I was thinking 8x12 for the new one. I can’t go to 10 feet wide because of the neighbors property line. There is a shed store in Vermont called Jamaica cottages and sheds. We took a road trip yesterday and visited the place. They certainly look sturdy enough. They will deliver a fully assemble shed for $4417, this has a 5 foot double door on the end, two windows, floor joists 16 inches on center, pressure treated joists, skids and decking for the floor. I believe MIL would be very happy with this shed, other than the paying of it. I can buy the kit for this shed and build it myself for $2993. Neither of these prices includes preparing a 10 foot by 14 foot pad of compacted gravel. These sheds are a post and beam frame, very solid. It seems to me that I should be able to buy the lumber and make an 8X12 shed for much less than either of these prices, but I need a cut list to price out. I bought a set of plans for an 8x12 shed, good reviews, looks excellent, but the rafters and joists look to be 24 inches on center, maybe even 30 inches. I just gotta figure out a cut list and get some prices from local lumber yards, who I trust for their quality of lumber. I know I can assemble lumber and build a shed, but it is not my area of expertise, code wise. I have seen new walls, almost always have a double plate at the top, and I have seen a double plate at the bottom, I have seen doors and windows with double studs on both side, and double headers top and bottom. I have never made rafters or hung them. I’m pretty sure I can do all of this, just need to know how. The shed place is jamaicacottageshops.com. John, those links are excellent, especially the one with the framing calculators. I just need to get the numbers to give to the MIL so she can decide what she wants/can afford. I would prefer a set of plans, so I have something to follow, construct this the proper way. I thank you all for the advice.

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2 hours ago, John Morris said:

I had to google that one, I had no idea they even existed. Are they made out of asphalt Lew?

It's a molded asphalt/material with a hardened finish. Less expensive than metal but probably doesn't have the life expectancy of metal, either. Apply with corrugated roofing nails. Been on my shed for at least 10 years and holding up well.

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@Artie,

If your just wanting to figure out how many for the roof/joists 24" on center will require 3 per 4'.

In other words 9 due to subtracting one for overlap.

And 16" on center will require 4 per 4' or 11 total for subtracting the overlap.

 

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I believe most of the big box home centers, maybe 84 Lumber, and even Costco, sell kits that might be cost effective and include roof trusses.   Might be cost and/or labor effective.

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11 hours ago, lew said:

24" wall stud spacing will work fine.

I thought the exact same thing when I built mine.  Fast forward 15 years and I had a lot more yard tools hanging from the wall than I thought I would ever own.  Had to go back and ADD studs, yup in between the old ones.  So now the 8x10 building has 12 inch on center studs.  Only bonus was I never have to worry about hanging anything from the wall.:JawDrop:

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Artie, I built my 8' X 12' utility building probably 20 yrs ago +. What are you planning for siding? To save cost and labor I used fir 5/8" T1-11. I set the bldg. on PT 4X4's . Used 2 X 8 PT joists under a 3/4" PT ply floor. I did recently have to build new doors because of rot, but otherwise, the building has been solid. Building it yourself is definitely the least expensive way to go. I bought my materials at a local lumberyard with free delivery of the materials. All construction except floor joists is using 2 X 4's including the roof trusses. Never a problem with snow, and I've seen over 3' of snow on that roof.

I'm definitely not a pro at this, but if you wan't, maybe we can get together to figure out a bill of materials. Let me know. I did learn a little when I built mine, including a couple of errors in my construction.

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Permits anyone? You found the "magic size" that escapes permits.  The other thing that triggers permitting is electrical service, as in "don't".  I built a gazebo without electrical power connected, although it was prewired for service.  Not my fault that the Brownies installed electrical power one night a few months later.   ?

Edited by PeteM

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Artie, I built my 8' X 12' utility building probably 20 yrs ago +. What are you planning for siding? To save cost and labor I used fir 5/8" T1-11. I set the bldg. on PT 4X4's . Used 2 X 8 PT joists under a 3/4" PT ply floor. I did recently have to build new doors because of rot, but otherwise, the building has been solid. Building it yourself is definitely the least expensive way to go. I bought my materials at a local lumberyard with free delivery of the materials. All construction except floor joists is using 2 X 4's including the roof trusses. Never a problem with snow, and I've seen over 3' of snow on that roof.

I'm definitely not a pro at this, but if you wan't, maybe we can get together to figure out a bill of materials. Let me know. I did learn a little when I built mine, including a couple of errors in my construction.

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Al, I was thinking of T1-11 for the siding, but after working up a rough stock list, and pricing things up from Lowes (pretty sure the local lumberyards’ product will be better but also more money), I’m thinking the precut kit from Jamaica makes the most sense. Little bit more money, lots less time. :) 

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I have heard good things about LP SmartSide siding as it's supposed to be more weatherproof durable than just standard T1-11   I'm planning to use it on my residing this summer.

Edited by kmealy

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If everything is pre-cut in the kits, that would be a big time saver. Is the packaging sorted so that you can get to the materials for each step of the construction as needed?

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