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John Morris

MWTCA May 2019 'What's It' Project (875)

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"What's It" Basic Rules Reminder

 

For a full run down on this project and rules please go to: "The Patriot Woodworker and MWTCA "What's It" project"

  • Only Patriot Woodworker Members are eligible to participate and receive the award.
  • The MWTCA only accepts a verified source to support your answer, so one should be submitted with your answer, such as a patent, catalog entry, tool book reference, or a respectable website on the subject. Do not let these requirements prevent you from having fun and submitting educated answers on the subject without verification, we can worry about references later. All answers are welcome, as well as healthy debates regarding "What's It".
  • If a verified and referenced answer is not arrived at by the end of each month's "What's It" project, a random draw will be performed for a "One Year MWTCA Club Membership".
  • Only Patriot Woodworker's who participate in this "What's It" topic will be included in the random draw.

 

Ok ladies and gentlemen, we now have our "What's it" live and ready!

The image(s) below is a MWTCA "What's It" image for you to research, and tell us all here in this topic post, just what the heck is it!

 

Project Details

The information provided hereon is all the information that is provided, no further information on this item will be added.

 

875.jpg

 

875a.jpg

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On 5/2/2019 at 6:55 AM, Ron Dudelston said:

Looks like a tool to roll a crimp on a piece of tubing.  But why?

 

10 hours ago, Gerald said:

May be to crimp a collar on cable to make a loop.

 

I agree.  It is a crimper of some sort.  The lower two sets of rollers define the tool to rotate on an axis.  A better picture of the upper roller may yield a clue but we know it is not possible.  Maybe it was meant to crimp copper fittings to the pipe to hold them together until they are soldered later.

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I think it is a tool that you put something between the jaws and then squeeze the handles. Your mileage may vary on what you want versus the results you get.

Edited by Chips N Dust

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6 minutes ago, Chips N Dust said:

I think it is a tool that you put something between the jaws and then squeeze the handles. Your mileage may vary on what you get versus the results you get.

I'll buy that, Kelly. Sounds like a winner 🏆.

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Some kind of cable or wire tightener ? Looks like you might put on a spool on the shaft to wrap around something, then feed the wire into the rollers , then crimp.

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I've never tried to crimp a piece of copper, conduit or really any type of tubing.  But, I don't think you would have enough leverage with a tool like this to crimp it.  The crimper I use to do small pex copper rings is a pretty robust tool.  A small tubing bender though is made for using hand grip.

aFlaring-20.jpg

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This can't be used for bending tubing.  It appears that it is used instead for thin sheet metal.  Notice the 2 sets of rollers on each side of the one handle.  That 2nd roller on each side has to have a function.  Thus, a strip of sheet metal (can only be as wide as the fork tines) is placed in between the rollers and fed down to the single roller on the other jaw.  That jaw has a single steel roller with 2 rubber rollers which would allow for some 'give'.

 

My 'final answer' is a tool for placing a kerf into flat sheet metal.

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The other minor part to the tool is the 'depth adjustment' knurled knob which can be preset and only allows the 3rd roller to close a predetermined amount.  The unanswered question is how you would draw the sheet metal through the tool as there is no friction roller to advance the material (much like a roller on a can opener).

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That was my thought also.  With that said, the tool would have to be used vertically with the handles facing up.

 

Next question - on the 3rd roller what is the function of the extended shaft?  it is not symmetrical and is not finished on the long end.  I thought it may serve as a guide, but the unfinished end would scratch the paint off the surface it rode against.

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