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HandyDan

Fearless Bee Keeper

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Thank goodness for guys like him. I wonder what he does with them. Hope he has an apiary.

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53 minutes ago, HandyDan said:

I played with bees and other insects when I was young.  I was probably seven years old when I got my first sting.  I didn't pick them up anymore after that.

 

Honey bees rarely sting, unless they feel threatened or cornered. You can see what this guy did in the video and he never got stung. I was taught to move slowly and deliberately and after handling thousands of bees I only remember getting stung once.

 

All of the other stings have been from the aggressive kinds of winged critters; wasps, yellow jackets, etc.

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46 minutes ago, Grandpadave52 said:

I enjoy the spring for lots of reasons but especially when the crab-apple trees start blooming. The bees show up for a few days. I often will stand under the tree canopy and just watch & listen; very mesmerizing. I've only been stung once doing so. I guess bees even have a bad day now and then. When we still had our Bradford Pear tree, hundreds, maybe thousands of bees would engulf it during the bloom. I never understood that so much since the flowers smell like puked-on sweat socks.

 

I wish I had more...they just seem to be far and few between around here. I do have a Mexican Petunia bush. It produces large blue/purple trumpet like blooms. I enjoy watching the bees crawl completely inside and then move onto the next one to do the same thing. This bush blooms one day and the flowers are good for a couple of more then fall off. The bush is semi-bare for a day and it re-blooms again. I try and plant flowers to attract the bees and the butterfly population.

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2 minutes ago, HandyDan said:

I have an empty acre and a lot of clover grows on it.  The bees love it so I let it go as long as I can between cuttings.

 

I used to get a lot of Clover honey from Pete. My favorite was honey from a hive he had in the Honey Island Swamp. I don't know what they were getting their pollen from, but it has a distinct taste and was really dark. He got premium price for that honey.

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4 hours ago, schnewj said:

Translation; I'm scared of bees,

 

Fear has nothing to do w/ it... gots deep respect for them...

Translation: terminal allergic in about 3~4 minuets..

and the Epipen and Benadryil is no picnic either..

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Interesting video and some great informative comments and stories.

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My father in law used to have about 27 hives.  I helped rob the hives.  At the time, I was trying my long hair.  One day the wind blew and a bee headed for that piece of hair on my scalp.  He told me to stand still and he removed the bee with his tool.  They are generally docile.  Depending on which flowers they have changes the flavor.  Here in Florida, there is a cherry laurel that blooms early spring and it is dark strong honey.  

Pollination...if it weren't for bees, we'd be on ladders with Q-tips going from one blossom to the other to have fruits and vegetables.  Unless the female blossom is fertilized by a male blossom, there is not fruit nor vegetable.  Female blossoms have a node between the stem and flower.  The male blossom does not have the node.  The male simply falls off and the fruit you eat is all female.  Surprise!!!!  Apples, oranges, pears, peaches, tomatoes, cucumbers, squash and just about any other fruit or vegetable is easily distinguishable.  You didn't know you were going to get a horticulture lesson, did you?  Grew up on farms and sometimes you had more male blossoms.  One man complained about all the blossoms on his cucumber vine but no fruit.  After looking closely, they were all male blossoms.  Grapes and some other fruits need to have 2 plants, one become male and the other female to produce.  

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