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Can you ID this type of tree?

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1 hour ago, hawkeye10 said:

Kinda looks like an Eastern Cedar. It's awful big to be a cedar.

True Cedars

All three species of true cedar grow to be relatively stout. The Gymnosperm Database reports that deodar, Atlas and Lebanon cedars all may be close to 11 feet in diameter measured at breast height. These conifers grow in the Himalayas and highlands of the Mediterranean basin and are widely planted as ornamentals the world over.

Western Red-Cedar

The western red-cedar is a true giant, often growing massively larger than any of the true cedars in the lush temperate rain forests of the US and British Columbia it calls home. The biggest known specimens -- on Washington's Olympic Peninsula and Vancouver Island -- approach 20 feet across.

Others

The yellow- or Alaska-cedar, which shares its range in the Pacific Northwest with the bigger western red-cedar, may nonetheless exceed 13 feet in diameter as exceptional specimens. The northern white-cedar of eastern North America, commonly termed "American arborvitae" in the horticultural trade, is known to reach over 5 feet in diameter.

 

Cedar trees can grow to heights of over 120 feet. Some species grow to 180 feet. They have a light colored, spicy scented wood.

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1 hour ago, Stick486 said:

True Cedars

All three species of true cedar grow to be relatively stout. The Gymnosperm Database reports that deodar, Atlas and Lebanon cedars all may be close to 11 feet in diameter measured at breast height. These conifers grow in the Himalayas and highlands of the Mediterranean basin and are widely planted as ornamentals the world over.

Western Red-Cedar

The western red-cedar is a true giant, often growing massively larger than any of the true cedars in the lush temperate rain forests of the US and British Columbia it calls home. The biggest known specimens -- on Washington's Olympic Peninsula and Vancouver Island -- approach 20 feet across.

Others

The yellow- or Alaska-cedar, which shares its range in the Pacific Northwest with the bigger western red-cedar, may nonetheless exceed 13 feet in diameter as exceptional specimens. The northern white-cedar of eastern North America, commonly termed "American arborvitae" in the horticultural trade, is known to reach over 5 feet in diameter.

 

Cedar trees can grow to heights of over 120 feet. Some species grow to 180 feet. They have a light colored, spicy scented wood.

I have seen cedars twisted but I bet it's because of a storm.

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Out here, there's a similarly twisted tree that the natives call scrub cedar. They rarely get over 20' tall and are prolific. In the late '40s, BLM, bulldozed thousands of them in a misguided effort to provide "better" range land. They are still there! That stuff does not rot and now, it's harder than hades. On fella told me he went through 8 chains sawing a pickup load for firewood. 

I'll get some pictures, later. 

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6 hours ago, Stick486 said:

Western Red-Cedar

The western red-cedar is a true giant, often growing massively larger than any of the true cedars in the lush temperate rain forests of the US and British Columbia it calls home. The biggest known specimens -- on Washington's Olympic Peninsula and Vancouver Island -- approach 20 feet across.

 

Cedar trees can grow to heights of over 120 feet. Some species grow to 180 feet. They have a light colored, spicy scented wood.

Stick, you are right. I majored in forestry in the mid '60's and worked for the USFS cruising timber during the Summers on the Mt. Hood and Payette NFs. I saw some of the most beautiful stands of big, ....BIG!.... Western Red Cedar, Sitka Spruce, Douglas Fir, and Ponderosa Pine. We would just stroll around and look at those beautiful trees, marvelling at them, and crying just a little because we were inventorying them for sale. 

hat

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Earlier, I referred to one of our twisty trees as scrub cedar. After conferring with a guy older the me, whose lived out here for over 80 years, it appears I was mistaken. I know...hard to believe, ain't it? :o Anyhow, he says they are Junipers. 

Still no pics but here is a professional one. Certainly looks like the ones around here. Those on our property are

much smaller.Western-juniper-Yosemite-NP.jpg.1fe10c6e5cbd457f97f5ed314136fb09.jpg

Edited by Gene Howe
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