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Perfect Handle Straight Slot Screwdriver

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gots some of those...

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Very cool Pete...excellent condition with great patina too.

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I thought my dad may have had a couple of larger ones, but this little beauty was at the Restore and was just a-looking for a home.  I haven't found his yet.  :(

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12 hours ago, Dadio said:

They were work horses, I used to use them to split the nuts on small froze machine bolts.

Herb

Hope YOURS were from HF!

John

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3 hours ago, HARO50 said:

Hope YOURS were from HF!

John

That was when Harbor Freight was Harbor Liquidators, they only sold cheap Tiawonese junk then, not the good Chinese stuff they do now.

Those screw drivers made great prybars and cold chisels, they were HD, if you had a couple of them in your tool box you knew it when you lifted it. We kept them in the trunk,under the seat of the truck, or on the floor of the tractor.

Herb

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On 11/9/2018 at 10:50 AM, schnewj said:

These types of screw drivers were standard components of the older Jeep tool boxes. They are really good screw drivers. I have picked up several of these at garage and flea market and love using them. The oval handles are really comfortable.

+1...me too...keep lookin' for'em whenever I go "shopping"...

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I have one, anyone have any tips on how to replace the wood on the handles?

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Arn't they just riveted on the handle. I would remove the old wood and cut a couple of new slabs for the sides, drill some holes, get some brass rivets at HD/lowes . rivet it on and take it to the belt sander and sand  to fit.

Herb

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On 12/6/2018 at 4:47 AM, Gene Howe said:

pHere's my contribution. I'm guessing that at some time it was a full 12". I think it was shop made from a file. Faint stitching can be seen near the handle. It's retired. Only used to open cans of finish.  

That looks like one of those old screw drivers that you snap off the tip to the next notch when the tip gets dull.

just saying,

Herb

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@Dadio, that would take a pretty tough hombre to snap it. No indentations. It's about 3/16" thick...all the way from the handle to just above the tip. And, it's good steel. I straightened and, cleaned up the tip. Needed the grinder. It laughed at my files.

 

 

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19 hours ago, Woodbutcherbynight said:

I have one, anyone have any tips on how to replace the wood on the handles?

I've never tried to do one.   Might try a youtube or just general search on the web.   Someone probably has done a bunch of them.

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4 hours ago, schnewj said:

Basically, the same way as you would a knife handle...

 

The wood is held on by the rivets. Grind them off, fit and replace a "chunk" of wood (scales) on both sides, set the rivets (which locks the scales in on both sides), and then grind and contour (haft) the handles/rivets down.

Thanks, have a bunch of small stuff I am working on currently.  Will throw this in and see what happens.

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14 hours ago, Woodbutcherbynight said:

Thanks, have a bunch of small stuff I am working on currently.  Will throw this in and see what happens.

You may have to search for a rivet source, but they are out there. Check with the places that sell "build your own knife" components.

 

In re-reading my reply, replace the word "grind" with "sand"...I should have been more descriptive. When you contour sand the scales don't be afraid to sand over into the surrounding metal. Use a fine grit for the final contouring, 220 or better. If you really want to finish it off, use a loose buffing wheel with a white polishing compound. If you use some beeswax with the polishing compound on the wheel then the wood, whatever kind you use, will "POP".

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