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p_toad

Old Tools

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Suppose the warranty is still good on the spokeshave?;) Only been 127 years. 

Those planes look like they have never been used:o...I'd lock these up in a Safety Deposit Box

image.png.9e7575c458f92bbb7b91802b8526330c.png

BTW...you suck!:lol:

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The planes were (and are) new in the box.   I found them at an old hardware store probably back in the 70s and just bought them both.   Too bad they didn't have any others.   The "knobs" on the drawknife are spring loaded and you pull them out the open and close the handles.  I expect the warranty has expired on those two wood handles, too.   The hole in the  one was enlarged by a prior owner and i should probably clean up the hardware some.  

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5 minutes ago, p_toad said:

I found them at an old hardware store probably back in the 70s and just bought them both.

According to this article by Chris Schwarz, the #40 has to be a 1962 or older so it obviously sat literally untouched on the shelf for 10+ years. Even more cool when you think about it.

We had a couple of old time hardware stores like that until about the mid 80's...so much new, old stock it was amazing. Unfortunately I didn't have the vision you did.

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/woodworking-blogs/chris-schwarz-blog/scrub-planes-a-curious-animal

 

I've never seen a spokeshave like that...very innovative considering it's time frame.

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5 hours ago, p_toad said:

That's because it's a drawknife.  B)

:blush::blush:

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Really unique drawknife. I really think someone planned this well, so that when the handles are folded they act as a safety to prevent you from getting cut on the sharp blade

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The scrub plane seems to be missing some kind of blade adjustment mechanism. :unsure:

John

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57 minutes ago, HARO50 said:

The scrub plane seems to be missing some kind of blade adjustment mechanism. :unsure:

John

These look the same.

https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?LH_CAds=&_ex_kw=&_fpos=&_fspt=1&_mPrRngCbx=1&_nkw=stanley+40+scrub+plane&_sacat=&_sadis=&_sop=12&_udhi=&_udlo=&rmvSB=true&_fosrp=1

Herb

Edited by Dadio

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Just curious. I guess the blade is held in position by the knurled knob/screw on the front of the lever cap.

John

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On 6/15/2018 at 9:25 PM, HARO50 said:

Just curious. I guess the blade is held in position by the knurled knob/screw on the front of the lever cap.

John

Yessir.   The knob holds the blade locked into position.   Sorry for not replying earlier.<_<

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Cool collection Pete. All great items. The Stanley scraper is phenomenal and unusual to be that complete. Great find there.

 

I've never seen Craftsman screwdrivers marked made in West Germany. Quite unique. No basis other than speculation these were produced after 1955 to maybe around 1960? I suspect these were made after Germany's formal occupation (i.e. West Germany) but during the early rebuild after WWII. From around 1946-~1955, Germany was allowed to produce some items (lots of tools) and Dunlap was one brand produced in Germany. Ultimately, Sears/Craftsman bought the Dunlap product line and changed the brand solely to Craftsman.

 

You have an example of one of those tools produced during occupation in the one marked British Zone. I'm surprised it doesn't have an inverted tri-angle mark on it as well as the Germany. This one likely was produced toward the end of the British occupation in Germany ~1956. Very similar to the Craftsman and probably produced by Dunlap, but since the factory was in a different geographical location, there were differences in same company tools. IMHO, with this one and the (2) Craftsman-Germany, you have some very unique tools with a special history. The Stanley-North Bros. is a great find, but the other three are far more rare.

 

Oh and BTW, that little aluminum screwdriver...only ones I ever remember were the brass ones too. My dad also had a brass one with both kids until his kids lost those kids.:P

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4 minutes ago, Gene Howe said:

I'm beginning to realize that many of my daily users now fall in that category. But then, so do I.;)

Vintage, Gene. Vintage, not Old! :rolleyes:

John

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2 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

Dunno 'bout that, John. Vintage usually implies purposeful aging. Or at least, so well preserved as to be as serviceable as when new. Neither is applicable to this old man. :( Of course, had I known I was going to be around this long I woulda taken better care of me.:D

A little sandpaper, steel wool, a spritz or two of vinegar and WD-40 or 3-n-1 oil and just like the tools you'll be as good as new.:cowboy:

Edited by Grandpadave52

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