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Never would have thought to mount the saw vertical. Now how big of a log will fit in it and how do you drag it into position?

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36 minutes ago, Gerald said:

Never would have thought to mount the saw vertical. Now how big of a log will fit in it and how do you drag it into position?

I mounted it vertical so I could plunge cut the ice chests. I either lift it onto the bed with my engine hoist, or roll it up a ramp from either end. Mostly I use the chainsaw function to cut uniform half rounds for those tables, then take the cant to a local sawmill to slice up. The half rounds are worth more to build those tables than the rest of the boards or anything I could make out of them. The bed will accommodate a 24"dia x 99" log. That was a design goal. For longer logs I use my Alaska mill to cut. Every now and then I find a crotch or burl to cut. When I first started I would cut anything I could get my hands on. I'm mostly cutting red cedar and cypress and they don't weigh near as much as hardwoods.

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WHEW!!

that is something...

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4 hours ago, brianpoundingnails said:

I mounted it vertical so I could plunge cut the ice chests. I either lift it onto the bed with my engine hoist, or roll it up a ramp from either end. Mostly I use the chainsaw function to cut uniform half rounds for those tables, then take the cant to a local sawmill to slice up. The half rounds are worth more to build those tables than the rest of the boards or anything I could make out of them. The bed will accommodate a 24"dia x 99" log. That was a design goal. For longer logs I use my Alaska mill to cut. Every now and then I find a crotch or burl to cut. When I first started I would cut anything I could get my hands on. I'm mostly cutting red cedar and cypress and they don't weigh near as much as hardwoods.

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WELL THROUGHOUT OUT GOOD LUCK.

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Awesome piece of machinery. I certainly admire your talent as designer, machinist and fabricator. Great job!

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 Wow, for your application you definitely have it figured out. From the looks of the attachments on the wall all you lack is a name plate & a patent number.

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