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A Rehab Of A Handsaw.

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Steve, great job!

Question, wouldn't using sandpaper reduce the efforts to preserve what little etch may be left? I have found a soak in a rust busting solution first usually gets the main portion of the rust off, then a fine sandpaper such as 400 or 600 grit, and clean up with WD-40.

To start off with 80 grit just seems a bit too aggressive for the first attempt to restore the saw, while an off the shelf rust bust solution usually gets the main portion of the rust off and would be more friendly to any slight markings or etches that remain. 

 

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I used the 80 on the non-etched side.   I also used the 80 to hold the scratch pad under the sander.

 

Because those old Atkins saw were so hard, etches didn't "sink" very far when applied.  

 

I tend to be Chemical-free in the shop....I thought I would try a scrapper to clean most of the rust off the "show side".    Etch still shows, BTW.....just very faint.

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9 hours ago, steven newman said:

I tend to be Chemical-free in the shop.

Except of course for the Mountain Dew, right? :o

 

Have you ever tried soaking in Pure White Vinegar?  I've done it on smalls with pretty good success. I've been using Evap-O-Rust on plane parts/bodies since last fall....works great on cast or grey iron...jury is still out on cast steel or steel. It does remove all the rust, but on steel, leaves a weird sheen pattern in the surface. Left unwashed to dry on the parts it supposed to protect surfaces for up to 6 months. Kinda' pricey, but supposed to be safe enough to bath in according to the salesman:blink:...I'll take his word...You can dispose of it by pouring down the sink. It reminds me of a higher powered CLR.

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6 minutes ago, Grandpadave52 said:

Except of course for the Mountain Dew, right? :o

 

Have you ever tried soaking in Pure White Vinegar?  I've done it on smalls with pretty good success. I've been using Evap-O-Rust on plane parts/bodies since last fall....works great on cast or grey iron...jury is still out on cast steel or steel. It does remove all the rust, but on steel, leaves a weird sheen pattern in the surface. Left unwashed to dry on the parts it supposed to protect surfaces for up to 6 months. Kinda' pricey, but supposed to be safe enough to bath in according to the salesman:blink:...I'll take his word...You can dispose of it by pouring down the sink. It reminds me of a higher powered CLR.

What! You're not pouring it back into the container. Let the gunk precipitate out and pour the "clean" stuff back into the jug for next use.

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2 minutes ago, schnewj said:

What! You're not pouring it back into the container. Let the gunk precipitate out and pour the "clean" stuff back into the jug for next use.

Oh no, I save it to the last drop...I have a container with new unused, a container with used but gunk mostly removed, and a container with gunk laying in the bottom...

Shoot I'm so cheap, 'er cost conscious I use the same process for a 79 cent gallon of white vinegar...

The label states "Safe to Dispose Down Your Drain" 

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10 minutes ago, Grandpadave52 said:

Oh no, I save it to the last drop...I have a container with new unused, a container with used but gunk mostly removed, and a container with gunk laying in the bottom...

Shoot I'm so cheap, 'er cost conscious I use the same process for a 79 cent gallon of white vinegar...

The label states "Safe to Dispose Down Your Drain" 

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Have tried just about everything....keep going back to this way.  

 

After a couple hundred saw rehabs...I tend to use what works for me.   Old and set in my ways...:rolleyes:

 

Trying to figure out HOW to rehab another of those saws from the bundle..

drill.jpg.8365e9e8d7634932ac9e23b99c81a962.jpg

Not even sure IF I can get the blade off of that steel handle.   Screwdriver, and that  Stanley No. 1221A drill have been rehabbed, now.

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2 hours ago, steven newman said:

Have tried just about everything....keep going back to this way.  

 

After a couple hundred saw rehabs...I tend to use what works for me.   Old and set in my ways...:rolleyes:

Gotcha' and resemble that process...I find myself going to the 6" brass brush on the grinder even when I say 'I'm not going to do it that way this time.'

No one size fits all for refurbing tools IMO. Most I bring back to life are intended to be users; I have very few that have any great value on the antique tool market...

Most purists would cringe, roll their eyes while gasping deep breaths if they saw my techniques.:blink:

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