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Not knowing where to put this I thought I would try here and if moderators need to move then that is OK.

I have a right tilt tablesaw and I am looking to make a sled to be able to cut staves accurately and repeatably They will probably be around 12" long. But they will be thin. Looking to probably make 6 to 8 staves per 1" diameter. So staves form a complete rod with a diameter of about 1" to 1-1/2" Would love to see others sleds if you have something like this. I do not want to have to set up a fence on the opposite side of the blade and keep moving it. With a sled I can make repeated cuts with maybe a stop block to set distance. Hope this makes sense. I can answer any questions if they come up. Thanks in advance.

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2 hours ago, Dadio said:

Here was my solution when I built this bucket for a 2X4 Challenge at out WW club.

Herb

 

Note the bottom picture has a reject stave in the jig the dado for the bottom is supposed to be on the small end. I used that reject to show tha opposite side.

 

 

2015-2016 312.JPG

 

Do you set bevel on the blade at the same time?

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6 hours ago, Dadio said:

Here was my solution

 

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The staves will be so thin that cutting from both sides of the blade is the only way possible to safely do it in my honest opinion.  If making eight staves I would use eight pieces of lumber and cut one stave from each piece in order to get exact widths.  Set a stop on one side of the blade and bevel cut all eight pieces.  Set a stop on the other side of the blade and cut off a stave from each piece.

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6 hours ago, Pat Meeuwissen said:

Do you set bevel on the blade at the same time?

Yes, mine had 32 staves so it was set at 5.625 deg. if I remember right.

 

@HandyDan

I am not following you, Dan. how do you cut on both sides of the blade with one jig?

If they are too thin clamp a full length board down on top would work.

 

Herb

Edited by Dadio

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cut the 1st angle of the 1st stave...

flip the piece end for end and cut the stave loose...

repeat as often as necessary..

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1 hour ago, Dadio said:

I am not following you, Dan. how do you cut on both sides of the blade with one jig?

 

No jig.  Use wide enough boards and move fence from one side of the blade to the other.  I believe John is calling for straight staves.  In my first post I should have said fence instead of stop.

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