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I glued some 2 by 6 pieces together to practice making a bandsaw box. I use Titebond glue. I ran the 2 by 6 through my jointer to get nice flat smooth wood for glue joints. When the wood comes off the jointer it is like glass, very smooth. I let it set for a couple of days. I turned the piece on its side to cut a thin strip off and while pushing one of the glue joints slid apart. Any idea what went wrong?

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What was the species?

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likely still wet wood, and the excess water diluted the glue to the point that the glue lost its strength.  the surface of the wood was likely dry, but when you planed off some shavings, you got into the still curing wood, which was still relatively wet.

 

you can lightly dilute Titebond with water to increase open time.  one part water to 20 parts glue, but no more.

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You said you used a 2x6? Construction Lumber? Probably still pretty wet and that caused the problem.

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oily tropical wood..

old glue..

joint was warmed/heated up some...

Edited by Stick486

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end grain needed sizing...

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Wow thanks for all the replies. It is common 2 by 6 construction lumber. The glue gets cold but did not freeze. The bottle of glue is new. The jointer is new. It has the helical cutting head with 12 small carbide cutters. It has cut the wood that smooth since the first time I used it. Sounds most like damp wood from what you are all saying. Thanks for the help.

Forgot to add that I was gluing the flat sides together to make a piece 5.5 by 7 by 4.5 thick.

Edited by RustyFN

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One day should be more than enough time for the glue to set. When I make my BS boxes, for glue-ups, I usually use 1" rough sawn hardwood materials and run it thru my planer to flatten the surfaces. I use titebond 111 glue and I've never had any problems with the glue.

As said above, wet wood could definitely be your problem.  Also, as was mentioned , You may be burnishing the wood with your jointer, sealing the pores so that the glue has nothing to grab hold of. Temperature can also be an issue. The recommended lowest temperature with Titebond is I believe 60 degrees.

Enjoy making your bandsaw boxes !:)

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That is a good sized area of glue to set. Was it clamped good and the temperature of the room it was drying in above 60 deg.?

Was the wood dry and the same temp as the room when you clamped the pieces together?

Was it green or KD lumber?

Was this the white or yellow glue?

 

Herb

 

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cool~cold room, glue and material...

the glue never set

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I think you had several things possibly working against you Rusty. Could have been any one of them or all of them. Don't give up on it.

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Dunno about the effect of the temp, Rusty. I routinely do glue up at a shop temp around 50 with no failures. Moisture seems to be the factor. Maybe moisture plus the temp? 

When prepping for glue up for bandsaw boxes, I always use the flat sander on the surfaces. Even, straight off the planer, they are never perfectly flat. I scribble on the surfaces and sand till the marks are gone. But, the wood is dry. Here in AZ, they say a newly cut tree is dry before it hits the ground.:lol:

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Well, when using Elmers, I have never had that kind of a problem............

 

Sorry Rusty, just rubbin it in for those guys who are dead set in their ways.... I can offer no help

 but just thinking, sometimes when gluing in biscuits I realized after the boards were glued up I did forget to put glue in one side of the boards and left the whole row dry.... Could this have be a senior moment for you.??

 

     A different thought,  when I did use pine boards on my drum sanders I ruined the sand paper on both machines and had to replace paper on three drums..... lots of down time and was the last time I used pine....The rubber sand paper cleaner thingy would not remove the tar or the glue ... 

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3 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

Dunno about the effect of the temp, Rusty. I routinely do glue up at a shop temp around 50 with no failures. Moisture seems to be the factor. Maybe moisture plus the temp? 

When prepping for glue up for bandsaw boxes, I always use the flat sander on the surfaces. Even, straight off the planer, they are never perfectly flat. I scribble on the surfaces and sand till the marks are gone. But, the wood is dry. Here in AZ, they say a newly cut tree is dry before it hits the ground.:lol:

Coarse' you know they add water when they saw it.;)

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4 minutes ago, Gerald said:

Coarse' you know they add water when they saw it.;)

I didn't know that.......

 

I do know that pine has a lot of pitch, if you leave a board layout in the sun ,little beads of pitch will pop out on the surface.

Herb

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50-55 degrees is the point where glue "chalks" and does not develop a good bond.   Not only the glue but the wood needs to be warmer to properly cure.   Glue at or below chalk temperature will display a whitish bond line.

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1 hour ago, kmealy said:

50-55 degrees is the point where glue "chalks" and does not develop a good bond.   Not only the glue but the wood needs to be warmer to properly cure.   Glue at or below chalk temperature will display a whitish bond line.

Keith, the TBIII bottle says that 45 degrees is it's minimum. As I said earlier, I've never had a problem with it at 50 degrees. 

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