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Today's project was making 1200' of used redwood bevel siding into 1200' of new bevel siding. They wan to end up with at least 700 feet after the decorator gets done picking for color. Started as 6" wide ended @3.5" wide. This siding was new about 10 years ago. I don't know where they got it but it must have been very expensive. Vertical grain, clear heart. It is going to be used to cover a shed on an estate. So far we have only found one nail, amazingly enough before we hit it. Since our molder doesn't have tilting feed works we are doing all the work on saws and shapers. The straight line rip saw took two passes to get the center part out so no nail holes would end up showing. Then we made a tilted table for the planer to take all the parts to the same thickness, didn't work well. So we put them through the Gomad tilt shaper to take 1/4" off the face. 1/4" X 3 1/2" turned to shavings in one pass.  The pieces that were odd thicknesses went through the widebelt on a carrier to take them down to the same. Then all went through the SAC shaper to put a 1/2" radius on the bottom edge. We decided to put them through the 12/14" table saw with a dado blade to make the notch along the bottom edge. 5 passes through power fed machines. Took two of us most of the day.   We now have a nice pile of redwood garden stakes taken from the thick edge.

       This is one of those things I really hate to see done. But at least part of it got saved. This is for the same people that had us make 35,000' of sapele T&G, clear, quartered and then painted it grey. Crime!

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That old Redwood siding was amazing just to look at.  You described it perfectly.  My house has the same under the vinyl siding which was used to cover it up and not have to paint it.  I think there is some new pieces up in the rafters of the garage.

 

 

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DRAGON1, that house being in Neb. you might be correct on that estimation. Them California people are pickey when deciding who gets redwood and who don't.

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 REDWOOD! Absolutely sure. I know the difference w/o ever looking at them, NOSE.

And I don't lack experience, We typically process 500 to 1000 bd. ft./day. Many different kinds.

Most of any one batch we've run was 35,000 bd. Ft. of quartered sepele. And yes, I'm sure it was sepele.

Just had someone bring in some wood that he called Ambrosia. I told him it was soft maple and he didn't like it. He was sure he had an expensive exotic. OK, call it what you want.  Used to be when we got beetle infected wood in it was used for the hidden parts. His wasn't even nicely colored. Some dull grey streaks. Tree had been dead for a very long time. 

What's the old saying - - A fool & his $ ....

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lol no offense, lol. i've dealt with alot of reclaimed wood too. i'm always on the hunt for chestnut (not to be confused with white oak). lol

 

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2 hours ago, Larry Schweitzer said:

 REDWOOD! Absolutely sure. I know the difference w/o ever looking at them, NOSE.

And I don't lack experience, We typically process 500 to 1000 bd. ft./day. Many different kinds.

Most of any one batch we've run was 35,000 bd. Ft. of quartered sepele. And yes, I'm sure it was sepele.

Just had someone bring in some wood that he called Ambrosia. I told him it was soft maple and he didn't like it. He was sure he had an expensive exotic. OK, call it what you want.  Used to be when we got beetle infected wood in it was used for the hidden parts. His wasn't even nicely colored. Some dull grey streaks. Tree had been dead for a very long time. 

What's the old saying - - A fool & his $ ....

Some of the woods I don't like the smell of, willow is one, another is p-elm, at , least that is what I was told it was.....smelled like p.

Herb

Edited by Dadio

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There are a few big chestnut trees still growing at Arbor Lodge, Nebraska City. At least they were the last time I was there. Very isolated place for them.

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I can tell the difference between cedar and redwood. Just rub it in my skin. If I develope a rash, it's definitely cedar

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