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Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

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John Morris

MWTCA March 2018 "What's It" Project

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I thought perhaps some type of multiple spring winding device but can't find any evidence to support such a WAG.

 

Just some general observations about this vintage Goldberg contraption:

  1. Three holes in the base to either secure to a bench??? or perhaps a wall???
  2. The "mechanism" is hinged at the base to remove install ???? Perhaps there was (is) a lower base which is missing???
  3. The T-handle & washer are designed to either secure the mechanism in place to the base preventing lifting during cam rotation or allow  the upper portion to raise
  4. The flat bar (with two knobs) might be adjustable to increase or decrease spring pressure on the cam mechanisms.
  5. The left bolt/stud for tension has a longer shoulder length from bolt head to threads than the right one; possible allowing for more spring pressure on one side versus the other???
  6. The operating handle looks like a common hammer handle might have been inserted for leverage
  7. The knobs, t-handle/washer and for operating heads appear to have been nickle plated
  8. The rest of the machine is blue

Sure you have have seen the same thing...sometimes helps to see it in print. Hope I didn't give much away especially with #8:rolleyes:

    image.png.d662fed9963509ad0e52c78e35eab260.png

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Let's go back to the info we have on hand:

 

"It was found in the tool chest of a professional cabinet maker and interior carpenter."

 

Why would a cabinet maker or carpenter be using a bottle corker (well, unless they were a wine-maker, too). 

 

Also, note that the pin is not properly in the hole in this picture

image.png.94d008b24dbea898d4cee6b8e8ff9483.png

so i believe this whole mechanism has been disassembled and possibly put together wrong.

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34 minutes ago, p_toad said:

Let's go back to the info we have on hand:

"It was found in the tool chest of a professional cabinet maker and interior carpenter."

Why would a cabinet maker or carpenter be using a bottle corker (well, unless they were a wine-maker, too).

Also, note that the pin is not properly in the hole in this picture

so i believe this whole mechanism has been disassembled and possibly put together wrong.

I don't think it's assembled wrong, the adjusting knob is just not tightened down on that side, see the original image.

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Maybe a way to install/remove  split nuts on a handsaw......

 

 

Or...maybe it is a clamp.   Those four  ends may have had a pad attached to them.   If you notice, there is a "stop" cast into the end.   Might have been used to assemble two parts together, depending on how thick.    You'd slide them into the machine, pull the lever to clamp the parts together....then push the lever to release the assemble part...

 

May have been used at a Book Bindery?

Edited by steven newman

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I believe it is a piece of machinery removed from a larger machine.  It is bolted down to a piece of particle board and the tangs appear to be close to touching the board.  I think this piece spanned a void and did it's job to items passing under it.  I remember seeing jar lids as shown below.  This machine may have worked with something similar but these lids appear to be too large for the tanged drivers on this machine.  

 

a15a6b83b21f70526581c8a686a7f2b6.jpg.5acc2cc85abd1c341f3a42146bf546c4.jpg

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16 hours ago, Grandpadave52 said:

 

    image.png.d662fed9963509ad0e52c78e35eab260.png

Notice on the right hand side, that the piece the "plungers" go through is "L" shaped like it was a stop.

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45 minutes ago, Chips N Dust said:

Notice on the right hand side, that the piece the "plungers" go through is "L" shaped like it was a stop.

 

I think it is just a boss for the lever bolt hole but may be pulling double duty.

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3 hours ago, HandyDan said:

I remember seeing jar lids as shown below.

Maybe it was used to install early versions of "Child Proof Rx Caps" so no one could remove them.:lol:

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Back to Dan's comment.  I agree that we may be seeing only a part of the entire unit.   

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It's got to be some kind of lapping tool. It's obviously fixed in place and something possibly on a belt moves below it  On one stroke it turns clockwise and on the opposite stroke it turns counterclockwise.

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On second thought and countless days of research is has something to do with wood wind instruments  I figured it is to correlate the readings of (an instrument) with those of a standard in order to check the instrument's accuracy with absolute calibration to perfection..

It's hard for me to think at these high levels so please next time do something simple like a screwdriver.

 

Preston

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Grandpawdave52 I had the hand crank valve lapper on my tool truck for sale and the stick models also. It came with two size rubber suction cups. I still have a new one somewhere here in my shop... But it don't mean I would be able to find it....They made a clicking sound while being used... I sold two of them in 14 years...Almost a very popular tool....

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1 hour ago, steamshovel said:

On second thought and countless days of research is has something to do with wood wind instruments  I figured it is to correlate the readings of (an instrument) with those of a standard in order to check the instrument's accuracy with absolute calibration to perfection..

Preston, I kinda' wondered the same thing...not being musically gifted nor around wind or brass instruments, but I thought maybe it had something to do with the valves on a brass instrument.

1 hour ago, steamshovel said:

It's hard for me to think at these high levels so please next time do something simple like a screwdriver.

Got my vote...at long as it's either a straight or standard phillips.:P

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54 minutes ago, Smallpatch said:

Grandpawdave52 I had the hand crank valve lapper on my tool truck for sale and the stick models also. It came with two size rubber suction cups. I still have a new one somewhere here in my shop... But it don't mean I would be able to find it....They made a clicking sound while being used... I sold two of them in 14 years...Almost a very popular tool....

Patch, I'm positive the ones we had, first in dad's business, then later in a couple of the farm shops came off the MAC truck...I know for 100% the stick, hand lap versions did 'cause I bought them:D Yep quite a clicking sound...not sure how they did it exactly, but while you turned the crank handle the shaft would rotate in increments both CW & CCW eventually making a complete rotation.

 

As for selling too, so many shops "farmed" out their valve jobs to automotive machine shops. I was fortunate to have learned from some "old-timers" how to grind valves, seats, replace seats, cut-out cast-in seats and replace with inserts, even pinning cracks. I did have to send out to be surfaced/"decked" or for some cracks to be pinned/welded or if all seats or guides needed to be cut-out and inserts installed but generally did all the work. Every mechanic I trained learned at least how to reface valves, grind seats, re-face rockers arms and valve stem ends. They also learned how to replace guides and under-cut guides to install stem seals.

 

As time went on and diesels were factory turbo equipped, our process on valves had to change from lapping seats/faces in with valve grinding compound to regrinding valve faces and seats on a 1/2o- 1o interference angle then using bluing to insure full face to seat contact. If we would have used grinding compound it would have destroyed the interference angle. Small engines/air-cooled engines we did then and still today I lap in using grinding compound. I have a couple of the stick versions in my tool box now--I think they're K&D or NAPA branded. Every so often, I have to replace them because the rubber on the suction cups falls apart. It's possible some of the kids dart guns or toy bow and arrows might have come up missing "ammo" in an emergency, but only possible mind you.:lol:

 

Thanks Patch. Brought back some things I hadn't thought about in a long, long time.

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