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Wichman3

What brand scrollsaw do you use?

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I just bought, and started, scroll sawing two weeks ago. So I wouldn’t trust my opinion LOL. I bought a Porter-Cable one from Lowes, SS375 I think. They were about $100 cheaper than Amazon, and free shipping to the house. Blade changing and tensioning are driving me crazy, but I’m pretty sure that’s my inexperience and not the saw. It had pretty good reviews for capability versus cost, while I figgered out if I like this (I do so far). This means this thread is very interesting to me, because if I like this, I WILL work all the OT I can this summer and move up in class.

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10 hours ago, Fred Wilson said:

Wichman - A good thing to take into consideration when stack cutting - perpandicular blade is  a MUST - both left/right AND front/back - make sure that you can acurately adjust BOTH - (humble opinion of course) - what say you, jt?

 

I agree 100% and that is why my RBI saws are perfect for me because they cut straight up and down without having to adjust blades within the holders. I can take a blade and put it in the holders and it is the same every time so this saves time fussing. I noticed on the Dewalt you had to do that and in fact back in the day there were certain fixes to take that forward motion out. I added a small piece of wood in the back of the table to raise it just so to even out the rocking motion. Saws like the hegner and the RBI have blade holders that either rock or roll as the arm goes up and down and is not fixed. Most saws they are fixed especially the more inexpensive lower end saws. Left right as Fred mentions is usually accomplished by a setscrew through the blade holder. Some are just a screw and some have a round disc that pivots or spins as you tighten the thumbscrew. A small machinist square can check both front back and side to side exactness very easily. 

 

I know the blade clamping system you are talking about and that was Deltas patterned clamp. Lots of people loved them. 

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Another addition to jt's comment - the Excaliber had a motor adjustment that controls the front to back alignment.  Once adjusted properly one doesn't have to worry about it any more.  Thanks JT for the comments.

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4 hours ago, Larry Buskirk said:

100_0186.thumb.JPG.2b41fbd4b58239e3d0afcd68a15ba637.JPG100_0187.thumb.JPG.c5d06dfff86e3e1c70b0132ed9b13b88.JPG

 

I got no idea on how good this saw is, but it looks like a work of art. 

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9 minutes ago, Artie said:

I got no idea on how good this saw is, but it looks like a work of art. 

Artie,

Thanks. 

 

Here's a link to it's story.

 

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1 minute ago, Gene Howe said:

Just plain gorgeous, Larry. Superb restoration job. 

Thanks Gene,

Now I have to get the rest of my old machines done so I can make my own version of a SS.:2030125484_TwoThumbsUp:

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I am curious as the the manual saw Larry.  I see that the crank wheel is grooved so it might take a belt?  If you were using the hand crank, I guess you held the material with only one hand, or had a helper turn the crank, or how did it operate?

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28 minutes ago, Cal said:

I am curious as the the manual saw Larry.  I see that the crank wheel is grooved so it might take a belt?  If you were using the hand crank, I guess you held the material with only one hand, or had a helper turn the crank, or how did it operate?

Cal,

The small saw was later offered with a motor and belt.

I have ran it using a sewing machine motor and belt.

I also tried it using the base mechanism from an old treadle sewing machine. 

It was actually first offered as a toy in 1923.

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It was also later used as an attachment on Delta's first lathe. (Kind of Shop Smith style.)

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Running it alone using the hand crank is rather awkward because you cranked with your right hand and worked the piece with your left.

 

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Larry - you did a GRRRRRRRRRRRRRRREAT job on the restoration.  Congrats.  A definite keeper I would say.

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19 hours ago, Larry Buskirk said:

Here's a link to it's story.

Finally got this read. When I saw the pictures above, if I had been a betting man, I would have bet you had the cast pieces powder coated...would have lost that. Same line on the tubes, I would have bet they had been re-nickled/re-chromed...would have lost that one too...That why I don't bet.:wacko:

 

Beautiful restoration with great updates. Your step-by-step thread was/is great and a fantastic resource for others. Maybe we can get @John Morris to pull that from the archives to current in his spare time.:P It's certainly worthy.

 

The Rustoleum Hammered Black was a perfect choice for your saw IMO. I've used it on a couple of planes. I really like the look it gives. I have a few more I intend to use it on as well...purists will freak out, but the planes are mine and hopefully will get put to use some day.:blink:

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4 minutes ago, Grandpadave52 said:

Maybe we can get @John Morris to pull that from the archives to current in his spare time.:P It's certainly worthy.

Most certainly, I'll clean it up a little, the formatting got messed up after our first big move to our new software, then I'll move it up here, thanks guys!

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Larry.. they are so fine...

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33 minutes ago, John Morris said:

Most certainly, I'll clean it up a little, the formatting got messed up after our first big move to our new software, then I'll move it up here, thanks guys!

:998427331_ChinScratch:Why do I have this funny feeling that I'm being re-recruited?:2087728586_WonderScratch:

 

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Just now, Larry Buskirk said:

:998427331_ChinScratch:Why do I have this funny feeling that I'm being re-recruited?:2087728586_WonderScratch:

 

Larry, I done recruited you weeks ago, but you never answered, or I didn't slap ya side the head hard enough with a chunk of iron wood, I may have been too low key about my invite, or at least you were thinking about it, so, how about it, you ready to come back and continue your hosting duties where you left off, for the Old Machinery Forum? :Cheer:

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1 minute ago, John Morris said:

Larry, I done recruited you weeks ago, but you never answered, or I didn't slap ya side the head hard enough with a chunk of iron wood, I may have been too low key about my invite, or at least you were thinking about it, so, how about it, you ready to come back and continue your hosting duties where you left off, for the Old Machinery Forum? :Cheer:

:wacko: Insaniac reporting for duty sir! :996877788_SaluteandRun:

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Just now, Larry Buskirk said:

:wacko: Insaniac reporting for duty sir! :996877788_SaluteandRun:

My goodness, now this is wonderful news!:cowboy: I am thrilled beyond words right now. Many folks here who weren't here before may not know who we have hosting our Machinery Forum now, the venerable, the almighty, the Ol ARN wizard himself, the one and only, Larry Buskirk, Larry, thank you sir, this is completely awesome, our Machinery forum is now "ALIVE!!!!!!!" insert Gene Wilder here.:2030125484_TwoThumbsUp:

 

Thanks Larry, I'll get a an official welcome packet out to ya via PM along with your moderator system set up, and your forum back on your hands. :Praise:

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