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Wichman3

What brand scrollsaw do you use?

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I also have a Dewalt 788.  It replaced an old Craftsman model.  It runs like a sewing machine, quiet, no vibration.  My son actually used it much more than I did, but it is a joy to use.

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1 hour ago, Cal said:

I also have a Dewalt 788.  It replaced an old Craftsman model.  It runs like a sewing machine, quiet, no vibration.  My son actually used it much more than I did, but it is a joy to use.

One of the problems I had was with the thumb screws to tighten the blade, so I bought some after market knobs ,they come in small and large, I got a couple of small,1 1/8" ones.  Sure makes a difference, and easier on the old thumb joint.

Herb

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9 hours ago, Dadio said:

One of the problems I had was with the thumb screws to tighten the blade, so I bought some after market knobs ,they come in small and large, I got a couple of small,1 1/8" ones.  Sure makes a difference, and easier on the old thumb joint.

Herb

 

Those look good Herb.  I am not needing them - yet.  Where did you get them?

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Herb - will agree with Patch on this one.  After "talking" with several scrollers before buying my second one, no stand for me - - - it's sitting on my sturdy bench with a comfortable chair in front of it.

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33 minutes ago, Fred Wilson said:

Herb - will agree with Patch on this one.  After "talking" with several scrollers before buying my second one, no stand for me - - - it's sitting on my sturdy bench with a comfortable chair in front of it.

That is good to know ,I have not heard of that  before.  I am definitely going to try that.

 

Now I have to move the recliner out to the shop to sit in while I use it.

Herb

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5 hours ago, Cal said:

 

Those look good Herb.  I am not needing them - yet.  Where did you get them?

Recently a fellow woodworker sent me a note about an upgrade someone did to his DeWalt 788. Seems as a Marcus Bailey has come up with a over sized knurled knob cap for the Dewalt  788 Scroll saw. He is making these and for more information you can contact:

Marcus Bailey

404-274-2532

scrollsawcomfortknob@gmail.com         He doesn't have a website, this is his email address. I just called him and left a message,he returned my call in minutes and talked for a half hour, very helpful man, loves scroll sawing and helping people. Also says he makes them to fit most scroll saws. His only advertising is word of mouth and has a southern accent.

 

I found them here: http://lumberjocks.com/reviews/9841

They come in 2 sizes,1.125" and 1.00" , I bought 2 small ones, takes about 2 min. to install.

Herb

Edited by Dadio

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37 minutes ago, Cal said:

Thanks Herb.  Area code 404 is pretty much the center of Atlanta - could explain the southern accent!

He also told me the same as Patch and you to sit down when I use the saw.

Also he sent me a diagram of a dust tray  devised, I will pass it on to you guys too.

 

Herb

Bailey's Dust Tray V2.pdf

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17 hours ago, Dadio said:

That is good to know ,I have not heard of that  before.  I am definitely going to try that.

 

Now I have to move the recliner out to the shop to sit in while I use it.

Herb

:D:rolleyes:  My "comfort" is a pillow on a director's chair.  Works purdy gude fer me  :huh:

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I have a Dewalt 788. I have had it around six years. It is quiet and has no vibration like my old Ryobi. I do mostly fretwork and scrollsaw bowls.

 

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1 hour ago, RustyFN said:

I have a Dewalt 788. I have had it around six years. It is quiet and has no vibration like my old Ryobi. I do mostly fretwork and scrollsaw bowls.

 

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That looks like mine, don't remember the # on it.

How hi is that stand?

I see you use a chair too, like some others here recommended and a foot peddle.

I like your shed.

No clutter either.

 

Herb

 

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32 minutes ago, RustyFN said:

Not sure how tall I would have to measure. The chair has adjustable height. I can't imagine cutting without the foot switch. That picture is from when I was first setting up my shop. There is plenty of clutter now. :)

 

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Thats more like it a well organized shed with plenty of light. and most everything on wheels.

 

The foot pedal makes a lot of sense, just like a sewing machine.  Thanks for the picture.

Herb

 

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John,

     Is there any particular reason you prefer the Hawk to the Hegner? I will eventually need to upgrade and want opinions from "real" people.

I started with the craftsman knockoff of the dremel 13 inch with 3 " pinned blades (made my first small basket with it), that was 33 years ago; YIKES!

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12 hours ago, Wichman3 said:

John,

     Is there any particular reason you prefer the Hawk to the Hegner? I will eventually need to upgrade and want opinions from "real" people.

I started with the craftsman knockoff of the dremel 13 inch with 3 " pinned blades (made my first small basket with it), that was 33 years ago; YIKES!

Well In my case it basically comes down to size. The Hegner is 16" and I scroll many projects larger. Plus the RBI blade holders are more friendlier to use and quicker to change out. I do use the Hegner for projects that require a bevel cut because I have it set up that way. Both are true production saws. I have an older Hawk so the new ones I have not scrolled on but suspect they are just that more improved and I would not hesitate. The Hawks do not cut as aggressively either but from what I understand you can now move that lower blade clamp to any number of settings which changes the angle of the blade and thus allows for more of an aggressive cutting action. With mine there are two settings and I always keep on the less aggressive setting because it is a truer up and down motion.  the table on a hawk is larger than a hegner also but I added an auxiliary top anyway. 

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John,

   Thank you.

   This is the information I am looking for. I am not interested in aggressive cutting, I want accuracy. I would love to stack cut but my Delta is just not up to it. With the mortise and tenon joints I'm using there is no room for error.

   I love the blade clamp system on the delta and would like something similar on any saw I upgrade to. The blade clamps on the Delta are; lower clamp uses a special tool (with a built in holder on the saw) , the clamp is two plates and a hex-head machine screw that pulls them together, the upper clamp uses a lever to close the clamp plates and an adjusting bolt(different size and type than the lower clamp, poor design IMHO, came with a special wrench to adjust, lost that piece but its a hex nut so any wench will do), once the upper clamp is adjusted for a blade size, just clamp, tension (lever), and cut. Tension is applied via a lever and adjusted by a knob just above and behind the blade holder. Once adjusted I don't have to play with any the adjustments until I change blade sizes or brand.

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Wichman - A good thing to take into consideration when stack cutting - perpandicular blade is  a MUST - both left/right AND front/back - make sure that you can acurately adjust BOTH - (humble opinion of course) - what say you, jt?

 

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