Jump to content
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble
Strawberry Orange Banana Lime Leaf Slate Sky Blueberry Grape Watermelon Chocolate Marble

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

 

Okay Master of the great wood turner, lathe tool sharpening queries.... I have both a grinder and a table top belt sander. which do you think is better to use for a beginner and which grit for the sander and grind wheel. i was watching videos but they dont tell me. so i am looking to the masters for help.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

IMO, the bench grinder is better because there are dedicated sharpening jig systems for grinders that are nearly fool proof. I sharpen with 180 grit cbn wheel but I used  an 80 grit for a long time with decent results. The Oneway Wolverine system  is the most popular sharpening jig on the market. I don't believe it's the best but it's the most popular and what I use.

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are less likely to overheat the tools using the belt sander, unless the grinder is a slow speed grinder (around 1700 RPM)

 

The belt sander should not remove as much material as quickly. For touch-ups, I'd start around 150 or 180 grit- but that's just me. 

 

If you need to regrind a tool shape/angle the bench grinder may offer more control of the shaping process. There are lots of jigs available (or shop made) to help create the proper grind/shape that are designed to be used with bench grinder setups.

 

I have an old Tormek water grinder. It is great for touch-ups but not so good for reshaping. Also, it takes extra time to setup and get ready to use.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You could get the Wolverine Jig and set it up to use with the belt sander.  A slow speed grinder and CBN wheels are all the rage today.  I use a belt sander and special homemade jig to sharpen with but am working towards the CBN wheels.  Need to get on the ball and order the wheels I have the slow speed grinder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am in the boat with Steve. I have an 80 and 160 CBN on a slow grinder. Note CBN have gotten cheaper and you can get a wheel for less than 100 now from HERE .

Wolverine Jig is great for reputability which is essential to sharpening. No experience on sharpening on a sander but there is a learning curve for any sharpening method.

If you cannot get a CBN best would be white wheels in 80 or 120.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Who We Are

Operation Ward 57 Challenge Coin Display Project

We are a woodworking community with an emphasis on sharing and learning the skilled craft of woodworking and all of its related disciplines. Our community is open to everyone who wishes to join us. We support our American veterans and active duty, being a veteran is not a prerequisite to join. Join us now!

Objective

Air Force Command Center Plaque

Of course just like most online woodworking communities we are centralized in the arts, crafts, and trades that are woodworking. But, we have another focus in our Patriot Woodworker community, we are the only woodworking community that was founded on our care and concern for our disabled veterans.

Volunteer

Patriot Woodworker Volunteers

The Patriot Woodworkers are an all volunteer community, from the staff and hosts who run our online woodworking community to the members who frequent our forums, you'll find volunteers in all of us. We are not on a payroll, unless you consider the spiritual rewards gained from volunteering, as compensation.

Education

Logging

One of the many projects we are working on is a wiki for our online community. A wiki is a great way for woodworkers and enthusiasts to share their knowledge to others, and to impart their knowledge for others to learn from, and utilize as well for their own benefit. We hope you'll consider being a wiki contributor.

×