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Kenny Tarmack

Best method for a toilet seat?

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Years ago I made a maple toilet seat, brushed on about 8 coats of polyurethane, looked great, just clear coated with no stain, within the next year the underside of both the seat and the cover were beginning to turn dark colors and/ black, obviously due to moisture penetration and mold formation. I'm now finishing up our basement, and want/need a rustic hickory toilet seat. Any advice as to what kind of finish to apply. Want just to clear coat it, with no stain. We do run a dehumidifier all summer, just natural evaporation from the toilet bowl caused problems before, help!!

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I have seen wooden seats for sale (oak, I think) but never really paid much attention to the finish.

 

I wonder if it was more a factor of the wood than the finish. I've had maple really react to pipe clamps and other metal s when moisture was involved. Maybe hickory won't be so reactive. 

 

Also, maybe so sort of penetrating sealer before the poly but just guessing at all this information.

Edited by lew

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That really is neat.....

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But back to the wood seat..... I've had the same problem with two commercial oak seats turning gray, as well as the varnish splitting and peeling. How about two-part clear epoxy? It forms a rather thick layer, and SHOULD seal the wood against moisture penetration.

John

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9 hours ago, lew said:

I was also thinking of the stuff they use on bar tops. Maybe that's  the same as epoxy.

The bar top stuff may be a different formulation but, that should work fine. 

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4 hours ago, Gene Howe said:

The bar top stuff may be a different formulation but, that should work fine. 

Not sure of the name, but you mix two components in a paper cup, and POUR it on. It was labelled as "Self-levelling", not brushed on. Haven't seen it in a while, but then, I haven't been looking!

John

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That is what the snake seat was made with. 2 part epoxy and you should only pour about 1/8" thickness or less at a time till that sets up then pour again. Epoxy should only be mixed and poured when its  around 75 degrees. This handle dipped in epoxy about 3 years ago and wife puts it in the dishwasher and looks like the day I did it.IMG_9655.JPG.5d9e6118b57679545da8aa2cb6cb53e6.JPG

 

This came from Hobby Lobby but probably cheaper at Walmart. Handles don't come out flat but is smooth. It needs to be poured on flat a surface.

 You need to google it if you intend on trying it.

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YouTube has a bunch of good videos on the techniques and cautions. Working with mesquite, I use epoxy often. But, only in really small batches.   

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As most of you know, White Oak is the preferred wood for outside and moisture environments.  I would look for some Rift sawn White Oak and make a set.  Then, I would wipe on  about 4 coats of thinned  exterior grade poly with a used, clean  nylon sock.  Let cure for about a week, then rub out with 0000 steel wool and TreWax.  (Ace Hardware or Amazon.)

 

Larry Jenkins

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