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Hey, can you give me any tips about how the top part comes apart? I've been able to disassemble mine except for the top three parts. I can't figure out what's holding them together. The hemispherical metal "cap" and the tube that it's connected to rotates freely within the plastic body, and the metal trim ring with the drill size markings rotates on the outside of the plastic body. In spite of this, the parts don't seem to screw apart and they don't pull apart with what feels like reasonable force. I emptied all of the drill slots first, except for one, which seems to have two drills jammed into a single slot. That's actually the main reason I want to get the barrel apart: to get those two out. Thanks.

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First, Welcome to The Patriot Woodworker Curly. Great you found us and humbled I might be able to offer some assistance. Looking forward to your continued participation.

 

Second, congratulations for being an owner of a M-F 100 Push Drill aka Buck Rogers Drill. These drill are absolutely cool to discover. I was lucky enough to score another one from a flea market this past fall. Unfortunately it only had two bits with it and is a little more rough than this one is.

 

I'd planned to put together a tutorial for the disassembly/ reassembly process I've used but the weather went south early and hasn't improved since. However, I insert some makeshift photos from it to hopefully help you along. Hope to see you more around the virtual work bench here at TPW.

1 hour ago, Curly said:

Hey, can you give me any tips about how the top part comes apart? I've been able to disassemble mine except for the top three parts. I can't figure out what's holding them together.

OK, to get you an answer quick the pictures are not the best quality and may be oddly sized since I'm using the WIN Snipping Tool, but hopefully will make sense. Cautionary note: I'm no expert on these but am happy to share what I've learned through MY experiences thus far.

 

I suspect whats keeping you from removing the index cap from the body is the helix guide (circled in red). Likely when you removed the lower half (the aluminum shaft guide body) it unscrewed from the helix guide. From this picture, the brass helix guide and tube (longer brass "sleeve" part the spring is hanging out) screw into the index cap (dome) via the threads circled in blue.

 

That happened on both of mine. Hence the heavy layers of painters tape to prevent marring the aluminum and Tenite handle. On both, I used a Snap-on (large) broken stud extractor which is all I had that would fit the ID of the helix guide and handle bore. Mine pictured above in this thread took considerable force to remove...this one not nearly as much but someone has had this one apart before since it's missing the wood plunger, had an external tooth lock washer in the index head and the indexing plunger lock was installed upside down. . I'll be glad to get better pictures of the individual parts as well as the stud extractor tomorrow if needed.

 

Once these two pieces (the helix guide and tube) are removed as a unit, the indexing cap should come out of the Tenite handle pretty easy since you already have it rotating.

image.png.b0835a4de431fc15d9507b3d0176c010.png

 

If yours, in it's current state of disassembly looks like the picture below, then the helix guide and tube are what's keeping you from removing the index head (dome).

Red circle/arrow indicate position and thread connection to helix guide. This picture is from my first "100" disassembly.

image.png.a0d9992edbce5e2726a970b207459048.png

 

Helix guide circle in red. The red arrow indicates a "groove" or un-threaded portion close to center stop. This should be threaded into the nose guide (bullet) end versus

the handle end. Also note the position of the indexing head lock pin; curved portion facing toward the small curve in the handle.

image.png.a946e81ae7d862dad9ce7fee81e4b57b.png

 

The only way you can reassemble is to have the "sub-assemblies" as shown below. Note the position of hte helix guide; green arrow to depict portion with threaded

area all the way to the center stop.

 

Make sure to properly clean everything (I used green scotch brite as well as wire wheels on my Dremel for all internal). Also, I used Johnson's paste wax on the

wood plunger (3 coats) then a then coat of white lithium grease on the helix, spring and plunger. All external parts were polished on my buffer first with white diamond,

then red rouge. The handle was cleaned with worn green scotch brite, then polished on my loose wheel buffer using a blue compound specifically for plastics...light pressure only.

image.png.e4c909e2156ac32c2a9d2bf0005f952b.png

 

 

Sorry for poor pic quality...Tools used on both for dis-assembly. The Snap-on Broken Stud extractor still inserted in the helix guide and plunger guide tube. The pliers on the upper right

are Channel Lock with a pipe style jaw. The more you squeeze the tighter they get working similar to a pipe wrench therefore the need to protect surfaces. I've had these pliers 45-50 years

but still can be purchased through Channel Lock. I've tried various strap wrenches but they won't hold. Bottom two are Robo-Grip which work similar to the Channel Locks just don't have

the grip power, but are need to hold one part while turning another. The pair on the right are Craftsman, but were made for them by Robo Grip. Crescent was used to unscrew the helix

guide and plunger tube assembly.; then used the two Robo Grips to unscrew the helix guide from the tube.

image.png.ccfbdd05a7cf6ca2a60600f7ef17d0b4.png

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Yes, the No. 100 is quite cool. Mine was an estate sale find, in its original box for $5-10 a year or two ago. It has some minor marks from use, but is completely clean and operational, not really needing any work at all. The only problem is the two bits that are jammed in a single storage slot that I would like to get out, hence the need to disassemble it.

 

I also have a Goodell Pratt No. 185 push drill that uses the same bits as the No. 100, but doesn't fit my hand as well. And a Stanley North Bros. Yankee No. 45 in its original box. Plus a Stanley North Bros. Yankee 30A screwdriver in original box.

 

I had a chance last year to buy the Millers Falls 709 and 714 "Buck Rogers" planes locally, but they were priced too high for their condition and my level of interest. Earlier this year, I was able to use a 714 at Roy Underhill's school. We were using jack planes in one part of the class and I was having trouble with the wood-body model I started with. He went to get me another, and came back with a 714! It worked fine for the coarse work at hand, but it didn't make me want to search one out as a user.

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6 hours ago, Curly said:

Yes, the No. 100 is quite cool. Mine was an estate sale find, in its original box for $5-10 a year or two ago. It has some minor marks from use, but is completely clean and operational, not really needing any work at all.

Ya' did good...REAL GOOD since it was in the original box and in the condition you show...

6 hours ago, Curly said:

I also have a Goodell Pratt No. 185 push drill that uses the same bits as the No. 100, but doesn't fit my hand as well. And a Stanley North Bros. Yankee No. 45 in its original box. Plus a Stanley North Bros. Yankee 30A screwdriver in original box.

Well, you're starting to show severe symptoms of Push Drillititis...no treatments to slow the progression down let alone any hope for a cure.:Laughing:

 

Mine started with one ~1974...a new Stanley-Yankee-Handyman 46Y...when I found out a few years back they had dropped the line (you can buy replicas of the 41Y from Garrett Wade), I sorta went off the deep end anytime I went to a flea market, yard/garage sale etc. I typically limit myself not to spend more than $5 for one...I definitely would go more if if the original box but have yet to find one in the wild. Below are most of them, although I've since added a few:blush:...I've been slowly working on the restorations...some are in too poor of condition to restore so will be part mules...most were a buck or two and had 0-7 bits...the pesky 1/16 is usually missing, broken or severely bent.

 

Mix of Stanley (some North Bros) model 40, 41, 41Y; Right picture the inverted blue/red is my original 46Y; also 45 (black) and 46 (red)

1850614292_40-41-misc-1.jpg.da87ccfcb987a27047439005028feacd.jpg  1358603835_46Y-45Ymisc-1.jpg.1d901b6f8ce274f93dcfbbb57471683d.jpg

 

Some Dunlaps---left picture all of those use Stanley type bits---one on the right uses same bits as the M-F's & Goodall-Pratts

936266776_DunlapRed-Blue-1.jpg.83a418cadfad5d6e622d61c503c57615.jpg 20171009_210938.jpg.e73d7b707c8cec035df72b2343910914.jpg

 

Craftsman version of the M-F Buck Rogers...designed by the same tool designer and ~ same era; same bits as Stanley

20171104_205855.jpg.dba88c75a5e73f5aa8ea7ca39a3db35f.jpg  20171109_164516.jpg.aca1eb9465974bc0a8caadf9d1d3de66.jpg

 

 

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7 hours ago, Curly said:

Earlier this year, I was able to use a 714 at Roy Underhill's school. We were using jack planes in one part of the class and I was having trouble with the wood-body model I started with. He went to get me another, and came back with a 714! It worked fine for the coarse work at hand, but it didn't make me want to search one out as a user.

WOW, you've rubbed elbows with Roy? :Praise: Now that's cool!

We'd love to hear more about your experience there in it's own thread and any pictures you might have.

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1 hour ago, steven newman said:

Seemed to do ok, for the price...

Do ya' sleep at nights?:lol:

1 hour ago, steven newman said:

Needs tightened up at the top....index ring just spins....

Just make sure you remove all the bits and hold/tie down the index head latch pin.

I don't think the index ring every fit tight...when new it might have been glued to the handle IDK...both of mine showed traces of glue possibly...Too much difference between ring ID and handle OD

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1 hour ago, Grandpadave52 said:

Do ya' sleep at nights?

Just make sure you remove all the bits and hold/tie down the index head latch pin.

I don't think the index ring every fit tight...when new it might have been glued to the handle IDK...both of mine showed traces of glue possibly...Too much difference between ring ID and handle OD

Now you understand the name Bandit.....:CowboyPistol:

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Thanks loads for the explanation of the innards. After examining mine further, I've decided it will just have to stay assembled for now. I don't have any screw extractor that will fit, and I'm not up to trying to repair the internal threads even if I did have the extractor. As I mentioned, mine already works fine and looks great so I don't need to disassemble it for those reasons. It's annoying to think about the two bits that are jammed together in one slot, but I have other bits of all sizes, so I just have to stop thinking about it:)

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16 minutes ago, Curly said:

It's annoying to think about the two bits that are jammed together in one slot

You might try "soaking" the bits through the opening with some WD-40. The second one I bought had a bit stuck up where I couldn't rotate the index head. After much soaking and light taps with a small compathane hammer I was able to get it to drop down where I could rotate the head and remove. The Tenite "grows" some type of whitish "mold" and cause things to stick. The WD-40 seems to break it down w/o damaging the Tenite. After soaking, align with access hole, invert and tap on the chuck end. Worth a try.

 

I'd be glad to repair it for free if you cover the shipping both ways. Will have to be a couple months down the road though after the weather warms up. My work-space is unheated. You can PM for shipping and contact information.

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On 1/7/2019 at 6:16 PM, steven newman said:

Picked one up a year ago...

 

Seemed to do ok, for the price...

 

Needs tightened up at the top....index ring just spins....

I wouldn't say that the index ring on mine spins, but If I don't hold it in place it does turn somewhat along with the turret instead of staying aligned with the body. I have to keep turning it back to where it belongs.

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Here's a look at the Goodell Pratt No. 185. It has basically the same turret dispenser for bits as the MF No. 100. In a ring around the upper body, just below the turret, is an array of eight holes matching the size of the bit that gets stored at each location. I guess it's an aid to quickly and easily put a bit back in the right location.

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On 11/20/2017 at 10:12 AM, p_toad said:

an article from some time back in Knife World

that was a  very  difficult article for me.  I hate it when an author takes the long way home and then goes around the barn a few times for good measure before  getting to the point.  I guess for some it's all about the journey, for me it's about the point, and that guy couldn't get to it if he were impaled on it.

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