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I have an older Delta 11" surface planer. Maybe 12 years old. I don't use it a lot and it has always done a good job.  Today I got it out to plane down a couple of blood wood pieces 12" long by 7" wide.  The cuts were wavy and not good. I haven't used it for a year or more. The blades are sharp.

 

I'm thinking that the wavy cuts are a result of slippage in the drive roller.  I took thinner cuts as I went to see if that would help, it didn't

 

What are  your thoughts? I'd like to know before I tare it apart.

 

Thanks

 

 

Edited by Ron Dudelston
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Thanks Dan,  I did do as you suggested. I just figured the drive rollers were worn out or distorted.  I found them slick and cleaned them up. I cleaned and waxed the bed surfaces. I also found one of the gaskets on the dust duct in the wrong position and partially blocking it. I tried to remember the last time I did all this and I guess it has been WAY overdue.  I had even forgotten about cleaning the rubber rollers 

 

Then came the  "Honey do"  So I'll have to wait till I'm done with that before I can try again.  I'll let you know:D

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Dan you don't want to wax the table if the board is slipping. It would make it slip even more so. Clean the table so it will pull the board on past the knives. Even if you take less than before you might even take less and try it. I try to take less than 1/16" per pass and I also push and pull the board if it wants to slow down or stop. The board needs to move past the knives at a pace where it moves perfect, no stalls or slow downs. That is why the power feeders are so expensive. They will show you some good results on making boards really flat and smooth..

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9 minutes ago, Gerald said:

Have to disagree with you on this. Waxing the table allows the board to slide easier and the rollers are what controls the forward feed at the smooth rate to get an even cut.

I have had this discussion on waxing the ways on a lathe with some believing the wax will cause banjo and tailstock to slip and that is just not the case there either.

 I agree with Gerald.   Waxing the bed and cleaning the rollers should help.  If not, the blades may not be a sharp as you think.  Bloodwood is a very dense and hard wood.   Roly

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Sorry for the bad info. I was standing here looking at the drum sander and giving my info. I never had my planer on my little brain when typing.

  Having a long flat table approach and a long flat exit ramp is also important to get good results from a planer. Yep the rollers are all that runs the wood through so yes Johnsons paste wax is what I use.  And it won't hurt the wood for finishing later. It sure sounds like you are trying to take too big of a cut so back off. This process takes a while so slow down and enjoy it.

 

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1 hour ago, Smallpatch said:

Also sand and grit from being stored close to the ground is bad on blades.  Do use a stiff dry paint brush and a blow gun to remove the bad stuff before running it through the planer. Changing blades ain't no fun and for sure they ain't free..

The first time I changed blades was quite an experience. All went well, except for one blade retaining screw. Try as I may, it would not budge. Must have been gaulded in place. Rather than strip it and ruin it all, I chose to apply heat with a very small torch.  After much effort ( heat, bump, try, repeat) it broke loose. I called Delta and they said there had been others report problems too. They sent a whole set of screws. I looked at each carefully to make sure each had good thread.

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I know that this is an older post but just thought that I would add that all of your cast iron tables should be cleaned and waxed often. You will find that you tools and machines will preform much better. Johnson's wax or any good wood wax will do the job.  Car waxes have silicon and may be transferred to the wood and could cause problems with finishing.

 

Paul

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