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lew

Bandsaw Tension Guage

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That is very interesting. I agree with what he says about the arbitrary determination of band saw blade tensioning. It all depends on the saw, the blade, the material being cut,and the operator, none of which are standard.

I have to do some thinking before I shell out for a gauge, but like his business plan and would consider it, just to show support for it. Who knows might like it.

Herb

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Same here, Herb. 

My method seems to work for me, though. Tighten, cut, tighten. I don't think a blade can be too tight. Well, maybe the 1/8" ones. They do break.:blush: But, so often the tension needs adjusting for different woods and thicknesses. It seems that I'm always making it tighter, though. 

Any notations would have to include blade width, brand, wood and thicknesses. There ain't enough space on the inside of my saw cover.:lol:

 

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Gene I use the band saw a lot, even for ripping thick pieces, I cringe at a table saw blade 4" above the table top.

The only time I have broken a BS blade over 1/8" was a half inch blade that I had kinked. Narrow blades are a different story.

Herb

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My blades say use the flutter test.  Undue or over tension put too much stress on the castings, bearing, tires.....

1. Put in the new blade and tension just enough to have it seat properly and not wander.

2. Increase the tension by 1 or 2 settings above the seat tension.

3. with the blade running slowly back off the tension until you see the blade flutter.

4. Adjust up just until the flutter stops.

 

I have never had a blade slip or fail.

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Another review.   https://360woodworking.com/monarch-introduces-bandsaw-precision-2/

 

A guy in the ww club talked to them about a group order, that we are going to do sometime next week.   He got a sample and said that according to the scale, he had been over-tightening his.

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1 hour ago, kmealy said:

Another review.   https://360woodworking.com/monarch-introduces-bandsaw-precision-2/

 

A guy in the ww club talked to them about a group order, that we are going to do sometime next week.   He got a sample and said that according to the scale, he had been over-tightening his.

The wws Journal says the numbers are not a scale. When the blade is tensioned to users satisfaction, the gauge is used. Then a note is made indicating what number it's on so that that tension can be achieved again. 

Letters would have likely worked as well. 

 

Edited by Gene Howe

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I've sat through Alex's sessions at the Indy Woodworking shows a couple of different times...having done that I've set both of my old Craftsman's up the way he describes and (a) never have broken a blade (b) get pretty good results considering what I'm working with...while the gauge might be nice to get quick, repeatable set-ups from blade change-overs, the "Alex way" works for me...

 

 

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I've been using the Snodgrass method when I switch blades...a gentle finger-smack and a "twang-producing pluck"...at one point I considered measuring the frequency of the twang...  :)

 

Interesting concept with the Monarch...set your blade to proper tension, put the Monarch on it, you now have a "number" to be used for THAT blade again.

 

This requires the blade to be tensioned properly first...

 

I like it for the repeatability factor...don't know about the price...

 

Thanks for posting, Lew...hadn't seen it before...

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8 minutes ago, joe the gas man said:

Alex once publicly gave me guff (good naturedly) because I didnt think it was cold outside in February in Minnesota.

But his bandsaw clinic allowed me to make my machine sing!

Guff...Gufff...gufff...I've been to Minnesota in February...it was COLD!:lol:

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1 minute ago, joe the gas man said:

It's all mind over matter, if you pay it no mind, it doesnt matter.

 

Convince my knees, shoulders and hips of that and maybe I'll visit again Joe...in the middle of July...:D

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Thanks for posting that video, it was very good and I likes some of his suggestions. His explanations were great. I went out to my14" Jet and tried to do as he suggested. First I did the square test of sawing into board and  then shut the saw off, then move the cut to the back of the blade. Mine was square.  I wanted to remove the bed but the rip guide is bolted to the bed and prevents me from doing so.  So did a complete check of the adjustments.  The blade is set where the manufacture said to put them, in the center of the wheel.  All other adjustments were good, except one of the guides was loose. I got me a 2x4 and ripped a quarter inch piece off and it did a good job, I am happy with the results.

 

I do have a question that he . didn't address;

 

All of the blade inserts, (the round piece aroujd the blade) including the one that came with the saw, are a fraction thinner than the bed.  WHY?

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23 minutes ago, Ron Altier said:

All of the blade inserts, (the round piece aroujd the blade) including the one that came with the saw, are a fraction thinner than the bed.  WHY?

Ron, IDK for sure, but I'll take a stab at it.

 

My guess is to allow for depth variations in the manufacturing processes for the blade insert. Casting & machining of the table to the insert bottom ledge likely has a high tolerance to insure the insert does not protrude above table height. Controlling that variation would add to production cost due to either more stringent machine set-ups/process control and/or rework.Some manufacturers now use rectangular inserts with adjusting screws on the corners allowing leveling of the insert. The circular type would be more difficult to adjust using leveling screws and again, drive cost.

 

Just a SWAG on my part drawing from my manufacturing and machining experiences. Hopefully others will come along with better input or logic.

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