Jump to content
Ralph  Allen Jones

A lady came my to shop today;

Rate this topic

Recommended Posts

26 minutes ago, Ron Dudelston said:

Ralph, you're not wrong.  This is a dying art.  Unfortunately, there's not a lot of money in it.  If we charged what we should then no one would want anything repaired or made.

 

fixed it for you.

 

if i have $400 worth of lumber in an item, it makes no business sense to expect to buy it from me for $300 or less.  build your own stuff.

 

"oh, but you do such awesome work"

 

fine, pay up.  or feed me dinner.  for a year.

 

people like hand crafted items, but they don't like the idea of paying for hand crafted items.  have a nice trip to Ikea.  enjoy your particle board!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, Stick486 said:

good one Ralph....

I use to do what you do now..

I wonder how many hear do the repair and restoration...

 

Me!

 

But you're all right above. 

"$300 to repair!  I only spent $150 on it new!"

 

I was a bit shocked when a customer a couple weeks ago had me order and install a $200 part on a recliner.  By the time she paid labor, she was probably close to the price of a new one.

 

I used to do a lot of work for local stores and delivery companies on new furniture.   A lot of it (even the trendy, expensive stuff) was pure junk, broken right out the box, or so poorly made that it would not last long.  I can remember one delivery company that would get in the "7 piece bedroom set for $799" and six of the seven pieces would have manufacturing defects, often in 3 or 4 spots on each piece.

 

I used to describe some of the customers as "serial decorators" -- get new stuff every 5-7 years.  

 

Often, if the new stock could not be effectively repaired, they'd just have the store throw it away.   Last year, I did some warranty work on a sectional recliner.   One of the cable releases had broken and it was a style I don't stock.   They just replaced the whole chair for that $20 part.

Edited by kmealy
Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Ralph Allen Jones said:

Hey Keith,

You are not that far from me and one of these days I may just drop in on you or you can come up to my shop. Give me a call and we can talk about it. 740 506 3012

I don't know if you remember, but we met at the Columbus Wood Show a couple of years ago.    I stopped by your shop once when I was passing through, but you were away at the time.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, DAB said:

 

fixed it for you.

 

if i have $400 worth of lumber in an item, it makes no business sense to expect to buy it from me for $300 or less.  build your own stuff.

 

"oh, but you do such awesome work"

 

fine, pay up.  or feed me dinner.  for a year.

 

people like hand crafted items, but they don't like the idea of paying for hand crafted items.  have a nice trip to Ikea.  enjoy your particle board!

You know DAB, sometimes it isn't all about the bottom line.  If someone brought in a family heirloom wanting repaired, I'm just enough of a sap to fix it even if it cost me money.  Guess I'm a Renaissance man.  By the way, those jobs have a way of bringing in business in the long run.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ralph, first I must tell you that I really enjoy reading you posts. Now I will tell you about a repair that I did for a dear friend. She is in 70s and had a table that her grandmother gave to her. It had usual ware and tare, but it had hide glue and was coming apart. It also had structural problems. She would only trust me to repair it. I worked on it as carefully as I could, by leaving it as it was and reinforcing the structural integrity. When I was done and she saw it, she cried. I could not charge payment, but we did go out to dinner with her husband. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think when Matt (Seiler) was moving his shop he commented that we have become a Walmart/Ikea society. Craftsman (and the cost of it) is no longer in demand. I believe that to be true of everything, not just woodwork products. Appliances do not last as long, tools are almost all Asian imports, and things that used to be metal are now plastic. We my wife first became disabled we had to get a powered recliner for here to sit in. We tried to find a quality USA made one hoping it would last. We did find a USA made one, but even so within 18 months the entire seat frame had collapsed and was rubbing the floor as it moved up/down. It's the world we live in, and I don't see it changing anytime soon.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.



×
×
  • Create New...