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Technically, it's still not a collection since there are <24, but I may have OCTD (Obsessive Compulsive Tool Disorder). This habit began in 1972 although I didn't know it at the time. My dad had a Yankee, Model 46 push drill so it just made sense to get one of my own. There were no BORGs back then; I bought mine from one of the old fashioned hardware stores which was down-town...same place you bought nails, screws, tools, grass & vegetable seeds, paint,,,well you get it...they were a Blue Grass / Belknap franchise, but sold other brands as well. I had just purchased my first "home" so to speak...a 1959, 10'x50', 3 'bedroom' mobile home on a little over 1/2 acre lot.

 

Fast forward about 37 years...my daughter rented her first house...needed curtain rods put up...got my old Model 46 out as I had tens of dozens time before for just this kind of task...she said, "dad I'd really like one of those." No problem, I'll just look it up on-line and order one...apparently Stanley quit making these sometime in the early 1980's...who knew...the quest began...at the time similar were selling for $25-$100 on eBay plus shipping...started looking at yard sales & flea markets...took a few months but I found a like new 41Y Bell Systems with all 8 bits for $5...she got it for Christmas that year. But the obsession grew...what if I broke a bit on mine? What if I lost it after all these years...so the pictures below reflect the rest...anyways, that's my story and I'm sticking to it.

 

Top Row L->R 46Y, no cap/bits perfect otherwise; 46; some bits, works well, cap and handle nasty; my original 46 still have original 8 bits; red handle/black cap also a 46, but marked Yankee North Bros (note in right side pic has the original instructions which are rolled up and placed in one of the bits slots; has 7/8 of bits missing 1/16"; black bakelite handle, chrome steel cap, 45, Yankee, some bits but a couple are Stanley slot shank but twist bits, Made In Germany so likely Dunlap; far right Stanley 03-049; cheaper version of the Yankee's; probably made toward the end of the production; bottom of all in top two pics, is a new replacement driver shank tht would work on all 46 models.

Push Drills 46-Dunlap Compile 1.jpg

Bottom left, one on left is marked Made in Germany, but on the cap embossed Dunlap; second red cap only marked Made in Germany...may be an earlier version of one on the left. Right pic, Blue capped is one of my prize treasures...no bits, marked Made in Germany and is very similar to the Dunlap's but with one major difference.There is an inverted triangle; above the triangle is "Manufacturers Steel Corp"; left side of the triangle marked "Germany"; right side of the triangle "British Zone"; from what I have been able to learn, this would have been produced somewhere between 1945-1954; Allied's occupation of Germany ceased after 1954...likely this was made after 1946 since Germany was allowed little production of any kind until about 1948 and before 1953 as Allied's lessened controls after that. I believe it to be the the first runs of what became Dunlap. I gave 25 cents for it.

 

Sorry for glare but maybe you can see Dunlap on cap; far right are the latest picks; (2)-Stanley 41Y's and the Miller-Falls #100 $2-$3-$2

Push Drill 2016-Dunlap Occupied.jpg

 

Left picture, top to bottom; Yankee North Bros No 40? can't make out '0" but believe it to be one of the first in the series; Next is Steel Craft-Germany-may be part of the same era of Occupied Germany; it's a Stanley 41 clone; Yankee North Bros, #41; a nice Yankee North Bros 41 but slightly different chuck than one above; a very nice Yankee North Bros 41 but again another variation of chuck than one above; Yankee North Bros, #44; note the bits store different on this one.

Push Drill 40-41-Y Compile-1.jpg

 

A grand total of 17-3/4 (18-3/4 if you count my daughters, but it's not on location so...) Outside of hers at $5 and whatever mine might have cost new, I've never given or $2-3 for any of the rest...most a buck or less. I've let at least this many go just because they were priced above $5...

 

So if you've read this far without your head slamming the table, keyboard or screen, thanks for indulging my OCTD. 

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That is an awesome collection Dave! Anything old tool just looks cool. I remember back in the day all the way up to the early nineties, electricians were still using push drills and drives to install boxes and brackets in rough framing. The push drill/driver was a staple in their tool pouch. Then the screw gun drill/driver really got popular and took over the push drill/driver market. 

I have one push driver, I purchased on a whim, and loved it the few times I have used it.

Wonderful images you put up there too, thanks so much for showing!

 

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8 minutes ago, John Morris said:

electricians were still using push drills and drives to install boxes and brackets in rough framing.

Thanks John...It just amazes me what was & could be done without power tools. I remember all the Bell Telephone guys carried one; hence Stanley marking/making some specifically for Bell Systems; Stanley did the same for brace & bits used by Bell.

8 minutes ago, lew said:

It's a little known but scientifically proven fact that you cannot own too many push drills.

Can I "quote" you on this Lew when my wife asks what I've dragged home this time?:lol:

Edited by Grandpadave52

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Certainly one of the first tools I learned to use in dads shop.  I have several of my own in the shop for that reason.  I probably should turn over all of my spare bits to him though as replacement for the ones broken by me years ago in my youth.  Nice grouping of drills you have!

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Just wait...next  will be the Yankee screwdrivers....4 yankees.JPG

Then he would have to make his own bits...like I did...made bits.JPG

Old hex drive bits, reground the match the Yankee style notches.....operator's view?

top.JPG

But, then again, I only have these four..plus a Stanley Handyman 133H........Collector?   Nah...

 

Wait til he finds out Millers Falls made more than just the Buck Rogers 100.......

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That's quite a collection Dave. I never owned a push drill until I started building a ship model. They work great when drilling those tiny holes to fit a thread thru. My MIL introduced me to them. She worked at a ball bearing manufacturing company and used them regularly for whatever it was she did there.

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14 hours ago, steven newman said:

 

Just wait...next  will be the Yankee screwdrivers....

 

:lol::D:lol: Sssshhhh.....

14 hours ago, steven newman said:

But, then again, I only have these four..plus a Stanley Handyman 133H........Collector?   Nah...

 

Wait til he finds out Millers Falls made more than just the Buck Rogers 100.......

Nope, somebody on here said to be a collection has to be more than 24 so...:rolleyes:

Oh I know about the Millers...let some pass through my fingers as well as a few Craftsman made by Millers Falls...most were above the $5 price limit I've placed on them.:P

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14 hours ago, steven newman said:

Old hex drive bits, reground the match the Yankee style notches.....operator's view?

 

14 hours ago, steven newman said:

Then he would have to make his own bits...like I did...

Well there's always this option but outside my budget...cheaper to find the "antique" tool and more fun too...or being more resourceful like you.

Garrett-Wade Yankee Push Drill & Bits

Garrett Wade Yankee Style Screw Driver

 

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I put the Buck Rogers to work this morning....

pilot holes.JPG

Drilling pilot holes.   Had to find the correct sized bit, first.    Then used it again, for all of these pilot holes....

chain.JPG

Even used a larger bit, to turn the hooks and eyelets into the wood.    Corner brackets needed a smaller tip than My Yankees had..

screwdriver.JPG

Just an old Stanley. 

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3 hours ago, steven newman said:

Even used a larger bit, to turn the hooks and eyelets into the wood.    Corner brackets needed a smaller tip than My Yankees had..

 

3 hours ago, steven newman said:

Drilling pilot holes.   Had to find the correct sized bit, first.    Then used it again, for all of these pilot holes....

Cool beans...what I like about the Buck Rodgers is the chuck style...can clamp up conventional drill bits. Some of the other Miller-Falls used a spline type shank.

Exactly what type of work these are best suited...much easier than using other "cordless" or corded drills. I still use my original Handyman #46 for jobs like this.

Great job!

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