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The adapter from the motor to the chuck might have to be custom made. Most motor shafts are "straight" while the jacobs chucks need a tapered shaft.

Thanks Lew, I had not thought of the tapered part of the equation, I did find some ebay though, not King Arthur but off brands, at a fraction of the price, but I am sure the King Arthur is good stuff.

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I have a ton of this stuff and have used it and foredom and dremel alot.

 

What are you looking to do with it?  

 

And no, you can't use a slow speed grinder.

 

Doesn't turn fast enough.

I have a standard grinder Mike as well, I just thought it would be too fast!

I want to give it a try with my rockers, for sanding and fine shaping contours and curves.

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While the king arthur is a good set up, I would look to see if you can find a variable speed set up.

 

The sanding tubes are good for tight places but you'll still have a bit of handwork to do.

 

The machine is more of a "carving" machine in that if you pair it up with the "typhoon" bristle bits it will make quick work of seats as it will hog out material like nobodies business.

 

As far as fine sanding it will work but your talking about lots of power in a little area and not a light sanding over a long/wide area. So if you hesitate you could get a wavy effect or press too hard it WILL eat in real quick.

 

You might be better going with a flap sander ( sandpaper on a small drum that "slaps" the surface) or go with one of the "mouse" sanders with smaller pads for tight places.

 

Hogging out the shape then hitting with a belt sander will help for seats.

 

 

these are the carbide burrs for hogging

 

post-3501-0-40772900-1422079179.jpg

 

The set you chose also has a few drawbacks in that the headpiece and the flexible cable aren't that long. you may end up holding up the whole thing while trying to sand a chair.

 

There ARE flexible plastic carborundum impregnated brushes (think of a bottle brush on steroids) that may be more to your liking and less aggressive.

 

By the way, cheap handpieces get HOT so you may need to wear gloves while carving/sanding.

 

And those flexible cables get hotter the more you bend them. AND they do wear out.

 

Dremel makes a SMALL bit that has the same stuff they use in the green scrubbers for the kitchen (scotchbrite pads) but they don't last long although they will remove the finish and not harm the wood.

 

I also have disks that are used for brake rotor surfacing that have the scotchbrite industrial stuff on them.

 

Check out 3m, they have pads in industrial grits and I've "layered" a bunch of cut out circles on a carriage bolt and mashed them together with a fender washer and a aircraft nut to make a "tube" to polish off old finishes.  They do wear out quick though.

 

If the chair is apart your best bet is a flap sander with 2 different grits. great for odd shapes like curves.

 

ALSO GOOGLE UP ABRASIVE NYLON BRUSHES

 

post-3501-0-25624600-1422081139.jpg

 

 

 

post-3501-0-51766300-1422081204.jpg

 

http://www.spiralbrushes.com/abrasive-nylon.html 

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Seats are not my problem, actually none of it is a problem, it's mainly the contours in the leg to seat joints I was trying to speed up, the image below shows the rear leg to rear seat transistion, typically what I would do is rough it with a rasp then fine tune it with my ROS, the edge of the pad of the ROS is nice and flexible and it sands the contour nicely. I also use a hand held drum sander on a drill, it works fine too, the King Arthur looked compelling but only if it would make quick shaping of the contour or transition at the leg joint to the seat.

post-3922-0-45663600-1422080398.jpg

Shaping the seat I use a right angle grinder with the Kutzall dish wheel, it works great, no plans on changing that method, then I bring the seat to final shape through the grits from 60 on up to 400 with my ROS.

post-3922-0-84257000-1422080842.jpg

Actually I am very comfortable with how I do it now, but the flex shaft sander looked compelling, but I am wondering if it's even worth a try at this point. shaping those transitions with a rasp is a nice break from the sound of power in the shop, I may just keep going at it that way.

Thanks Mike!

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For the back slats I'd get a $99 spindle sander from ryobi at the orange box store (unless you got 500 to drop on a delta spindle shaper)  or get a metal carbide tube drum sander for the drill press.   

 

As far as the other curves like arms to seat I'd go with that set up but with a way longer cable and handpiece.

 

Japanese woodworker has some really nice rasps that may be worth looking into.

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For the back slats I'd get a $99 spindle sander from ryobi at the orange box store (unless you got 500 to drop on a delta spindle shaper)  or get a metal carbide tube drum sander for the drill press.   

 

As far as the other curves like arms to seat I'd go with that set up but with a way longer cable and handpiece.

 

Japanese woodworker has some really nice rasps that may be worth looking into.

Bought a Delta spindle sander for those Mike a few years back, cost bout 200 or so, the benchtop model and it works fine. Hmm, you still think the King Arthur would do those transitions well do ya?

Let me think on this one.

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That's the ticket. and it can be hung from ceiling and lowered/raised real easy.  

 

Foredom bits though are higher priced than dremel though.

 

go to home depot or ebay and check out the dremel set ups.  handheld and easy to change bits. I have 5 of them, some set up with just one bit.

 

They are cheap and you could hang a few from ceiling, take one, shape, then grab another and sand. or 2 different grits on 2 machines.

 

And they are variable speed.

 

The foredom with the long handset you may want to use a foot pedal for on/off.

 

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/dremel-4000-rotary-tool-/301492080242?pt=Power_Tools&hash=item4632540e72

 

And I saw the foot pedal for 36 bucks on ebay too.

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While the king arthur is a good set up, I would look to see if you can find a variable speed set up.

 

The sanding tubes are good for tight places but you'll still have a bit of handwork to do.

 

The machine is more of a "carving" machine in that if you pair it up with the "typhoon" bristle bits it will make quick work of seats as it will hog out material like nobodies business.

 

As far as fine sanding it will work but your talking about lots of power in a little area and not a light sanding over a long/wide area. So if you hesitate you could get a wavy effect or press too hard it WILL eat in real quick.

 

You might be better going with a flap sander ( sandpaper on a small drum that "slaps" the surface) or go with one of the "mouse" sanders with smaller pads for tight places.

 

Hogging out the shape then hitting with a belt sander will help for seats.

 

 

these are the carbide burrs for hogging

 

attachicon.gifburr_group.jpg

 

The set you chose also has a few drawbacks in that the headpiece and the flexible cable aren't that long. you may end up holding up the whole thing while trying to sand a chair.

 

There ARE flexible plastic carborundum impregnated brushes (think of a bottle brush on steroids) that may be more to your liking and less aggressive.

 

By the way, cheap handpieces get HOT so you may need to wear gloves while carving/sanding.

 

And those flexible cables get hotter the more you bend them. AND they do wear out.

 

Dremel makes a SMALL bit that has the same stuff they use in the green scrubbers for the kitchen (scotchbrite pads) but they don't last long although they will remove the finish and not harm the wood.

 

I also have disks that are used for brake rotor surfacing that have the scotchbrite industrial stuff on them.

 

Check out 3m, they have pads in industrial grits and I've "layered" a bunch of cut out circles on a carriage bolt and mashed them together with a fender washer and a aircraft nut to make a "tube" to polish off old finishes.  They do wear out quick though.

 

If the chair is apart your best bet is a flap sander with 2 different grits. great for odd shapes like curves.

 

ALSO GOOGLE UP ABRASIVE NYLON BRUSHES

 

attachicon.gifDrumSanderTips_combo 3.jpg

 

 

 

http://www.gordonbrush.com/spiral-brushes-abrasive-single-spiral-power-brushes-c-1_130_134-l-en.html

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This has been a very interesting read and educational topic. I would have never thought about using these tools like this, I use them for intarsia and segmentation projects. When it came to final shaping and sanding on furniture I always did it by hand. Thanks for a great thread guys.

You bet Wayne!

Yep there is a whole line of tools out there for shaping and carving with power, pretty interesting indeed.

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On 1/24/2015 at 1:15 AM, DRAGON1 said:

While the king arthur is a good set up, I would look to see if you can find a variable speed set up.

 

The sanding tubes are good for tight places but you'll still have a bit of handwork to do.

 

The machine is more of a "carving" machine in that if you pair it up with the "typhoon" bristle bits it will make quick work of seats as it will hog out material like nobodies business.

 

As far as fine sanding it will work but your talking about lots of power in a little area and not a light sanding over a long/wide area. So if you hesitate you could get a wavy effect or press too hard it WILL eat in real quick.

 

You might be better going with a flap sander ( sandpaper on a small drum that "slaps" the surface) or go with one of the "mouse" sanders with smaller pads for tight places.

 

Hogging out the shape then hitting with a belt sander will help for seats.

 

 

these are the carbide burrs for hogging

 

post-3501-0-40772900-1422079179.jpg

 

The set you chose also has a few drawbacks in that the headpiece and the flexible cable aren't that long. you may end up holding up the whole thing while trying to sand a chair.

 

There ARE flexible plastic carborundum impregnated brushes (think of a bottle brush on steroids) that may be more to your liking and less aggressive.

 

By the way, cheap handpieces get HOT so you may need to wear gloves while carving/sanding.

 

And those flexible cables get hotter the more you bend them. AND they do wear out.

 

Dremel makes a SMALL bit that has the same stuff they use in the green scrubbers for the kitchen (scotchbrite pads) but they don't last long although they will remove the finish and not harm the wood.

 

I also have disks that are used for brake rotor surfacing that have the scotchbrite industrial stuff on them.

 

Check out 3m, they have pads in industrial grits and I've "layered" a bunch of cut out circles on a carriage bolt and mashed them together with a fender washer and a aircraft nut to make a "tube" to polish off old finishes.  They do wear out quick though.

 

If the chair is apart your best bet is a flap sander with 2 different grits. great for odd shapes like curves.

 

ALSO GOOGLE UP ABRASIVE NYLON BRUSHES

 

post-3501-0-25624600-1422081139.jpg

 

 

 

post-3501-0-51766300-1422081204.jpg

 

http://www.spiralbrushes.com/abrasive-nylon.html 

Where can one buy the coated burrs like the ones in the above picture?

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